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Introduction
Happy Passover!

Tonight we gather together to celebrate Passover, our holiday of freedom. We will eat a great meal together, enjoy (at least!) four glasses of wine, and tell the story of our ancestors’ liberation from slavery in Egypt. We welcome our friends and family members from other backgrounds to reflect with us on the meaning of freedom in all our lives and histories. We will consider the blessings in our lives, pledge to work harder at freeing those who still suffer, and begin to cast off the things in our own lives that oppress us.

Introduction

It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Pesach
By Gary Teblum
(sung to the tune of “It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas”)

It's beginning to look a lot like Pesach
Ev'rywhere you go;
So get out your pad and pen, ordering once again
With lolly cones and macaroons, you know.

It's beginning to look a lot like Pesach,
Streit’s in ev'ry store,
But the sorriest sight they’ll be are the matzah crumbs you’ll see
On your own tile floor.

A pair of horseradish roots and a few scallion shoots
Is the wish of Barney and Ben;
Gefilte fish and eggs on a dish
Is the hope of Judith and Jen;
And Mom and Dad can hardly wait for serving bread again.

It's beginning to look a lot like Pesach
Ev'rywhere you go;
There’s dayenu to be sung, questioning for the young,
The standard four that all the kids do know.

It's beginning to look a lot like Pesach;
Seder soon will start,
And the thing that will make us cheer is when everyone does hear
Meal’s the next big part.

Introduction

TONIGHT
(To the tune of "Tonight," from West Side Story, By Rabbi Dan Liben, Passover, 2000)

Tonight, tonight,
We'll tell a tale tonight,
Of Pharoah, Slaves and God's awesome might;

We'll do it right, with matzah, and maror
and four children: -dull, wicked- and bright!
Tonight, we'll tell our people's story,

The "genut" and then the glory,
And how it came out right.

And when we're through
You'll know you've been freed too
On this Saaay-der night!

Tonight, tonight, we'll drink four cups of wine,
We'll laugh and sing and dine
'till its light;

The tale's not new
And yet it still rings true
It gives meaning -to being -a Jew!

Egyptian masters they did beat us
But Moses he did lead us

From darkness into light;
And soon we'll know
Why God did make it so
On this Saaaay-der night!

Introduction

There's No Seder Like our Seder (By Rabbi Dan Liben, sung to the tune of "There's no Business like Show business")

There's no Seder like our Seder,
There's no Seder I know.
Everything about it is halachic
Nothing that the Torah won't allow.
Listen how we read the whole Haggadah
It's all in Hebrew
'Cause we know how.

There's no Seder like our Seder,
We tell a tale that is swell:
Moses took the people out into the heat
They baked the matzah
While on their feet
Now isn't that a story
That just can't be beat?
Let's go on with the show!

Introduction

Our Passover Things

(To be sung to the tune of "My Favorite Things" from the "Sound of Music")

Cleaning and cooking and so many dishes
Out with the chametz, no pasta, no knishes
Fish that's gefilted, horseradish that stings
These are a few of our Passover things.

Matzah and karpas and chopped up charoset
Shankbones and kiddish and yiddish neuroses
Tante who kvetches and uncle who sings
These are a few of our Passover things.

Motzi and moror and trouble with Pharaohs
Famines and locusts and slaves with wheelbarrows
Matzah balls floating and eggshell that clings
These are a few of our Passover things.

When the plagues strike
When the lice bite
When we're feeling sad
We simply remember our Passover things
And then we don't feel so bad.

Introduction

BEITZAH=ROASTED EGG

KARPAS=PARSLEY

Z'ROA=ROASTED BONE

CHAROSET=CHOPPED FRUIT/NUTS

MAROR =BITTER HERB/HORSERADISH

Introduction

Roasted shankbone
One of the most striking symbols of Passover is the roasted lamb shankbone (called zeroah), which commemorates the paschal (lamb) sacrifice made the night the ancient Hebrews fled Egypt. Some say it symbolizes the outstretched arm of God (the Hebrew word zeroah can mean “arm”). Many vegetarians use a roasted beet instead. This isn’t a new idea; the great Biblical and Talmudic commentator Rashi suggested it back in the eleventh century.

Maror (bitter herb)
Any bitter herb will work, though horseradish is the most common. Bitter herbs bring tears to the eyes and recall the bitterness of slavery. The Seder refers to the slavery in Egypt, but people are called to look at their own bitter enslavements.

Charoset
There’s nothing further from maror than charoset (“cha-ROH-set”), the sweet salad of apples, nuts, wine, and cinnamon that represents the mortar used by the Hebrew slaves to make bricks.

Karpas
Karpas is a green vegetable, usually parsley (though any spring green will do). Karpas symbolizes the freshness of spring. Some families still use boiled potatoes for karpas, continuing a tradition from Eastern Europe where it was difficult to obtain fresh green vegetables.

Salt water
Salt water symbolizes the tears and sweat of enslavement, though paradoxically, it’s also a symbol for purity, springtime, and the sea.

Orange
The tradition of putting an orange on the seder plate in is a response to a less evolved rabbi who told a young girl that a woman belongs on a bimah as much as an orange on a Seder plate. The orange is now said to be a symbol of the fruitfulness of all Jews, whether they be gay straight, male or female. =

Roasted Egg
The roasted egg (baytsah) is a symbol in many different cultures, usually signifying springtime and renewal. Here it stands in place of one of the sacrificial offerings which was performed in the days of the Second Temple. Another popular interpretation is that the egg is like the Jewish people: the hotter you make it for them, the tougher they get.

Boiled Egg (to eat)

May we reflect on our lives this year and soften our hearts to those around us. Another year has passed since we gathered at the Seder table and we are once again reminded that life is fleeting. We are reminded to use each precious moment wisely so that no day will pass without bringing us closer to some worthy achievement as we all take a moment to be aware of how truly blessed and fortunate we are.

Introduction
Source : Anita Silvert, http://www.juf.org/news/world.aspx?id=414773

Have you heard about putting an orange on the Seder Plate?  Even if you have, I'm sure it's not the true story of how it came to be, so to do my part to put rumors to rest, I present you here with the real story of why people put an orange on the Seder plate. 

It started with Dr. Susannah Heschel. The story you may have heard goes something like this: After a lecture given in Miami Beach, a man (usually Orthodox) stood up and angrily denounced feminism, saying that a woman belongs on a bima (pulpit) the way an orange belongs on a Seder plate. To support women's rightful place in Jewish life, people put an orange on their Passover tables.

It's a powerful story. And it's absolutely false. It never happened. 

Heshchel herself tells the story of the genesis of this new ritual in the 2003 book, The Women's Passover Companion (JPL). It all started with a story from Oberlin College in the early 1980's. Heschel was speaking at the Hillel, and while there, she came across ahaggadah written by some Oberlin students to bring a feminist voice into the holiday. In it, a story is told about a young girl who asks a Rebbe what room there is in Judaism for a lesbian. The Rebbe rises in anger and shouts, "There's as much room for a lesbian in Judaism as there is for a crust of bread on the seder plate." 

Though Heschel was inspired by the idea behind the story, she couldn't follow it literally. Besides the fact that it would make everything-the dish, the table, the meal, the house-unkosher for Passover, it carried a message that lesbians were a violation of Judaism itself, that these women were infecting the community with something impure.

So, the next year, Heschel put an orange on the family seder plate, "I chose an orange because it suggests the fruitfulness for all Jews when lesbians and gay men are contributing and active members of Jewish life."

The symbolism grew to include people who feel marginalized from the Jewish community: the widow, the orphan, women's issues in general, but solidarity with the gay and lesbian Jewish community was at the core. It wasn't a navel orange; it had to have seeds to symbolize rebirth, renewal. And spitting out the seeds reminds us to spit out the hatred and ostracization of homosexuals in our community, and others who feel prejudice's sting.  The orange is segmented, not fragmented. Our community has discrete segments, but they form a whole. The symbolism of the orange may have expanded, but its origins are clearly from a desire to liberate an entire segment of our community from their painful mitzrayim-narrow place.

Introduction

Kadesh, Urchatz, Karpas, Yachatz
Maggid, Rachtza, Motzi Matzah
Maror, Korech, Shulchan Orech
Tzafun, Barech, Hallel, Nirtzah

Introduction

The seder officially begins with a physical act: lighting the candles. In Jewish tradition, lighting candles and saying a blessing over them marks a time of transition, from the day that is ending to the one that is beginning, from ordinary time to sacred time. Lighting the candles is an important part of our Passover celebration because their flickering light reminds us of the importance of keeping the fragile flame of freedom alive in the world. And, because it is also Shabbat, we say the blessing over the Shabbat candles as well.

Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu melech ha'olam asher kid'shanu b'mitzvotav, v'tzivanu l'hadlik ner shel Shabbat V'shel Yom Tov.

Blessed are You, Adonai our God, Ruler of the Universe, who has sanctified us with laws and commanded us to light Shabbat lights and the festival lights. As we light the festival candles, we acknowledge that as they brighten our Passover table, good thoughts, good words, and good deeds brighten our days.

Kadesh

(sung to the tune of “Somewhere Over the Rainbow”) (by Gary Teblum and Dan Ochman)

Four times during our seder
We drink wine
There's a prayer that I say then
Each and every time.

Four times during our seder
Cups filled high,
Though it’s just Manischevitz
Please give it one more try.

Someday we’ll upgrade to boutique
Our seder would be quite unique
And sassy.

We’ll serve a Kosher Chardonnay
Or a merlot, what would you say?
We’d be so classy

Four times during our seder
We drink wine
There's a prayer that I say then
Each and every time.

Baruch atah adonai said
Borei Peri
Hagafen, then amen.

Kadesh

Sweet Kosher Wine

(to the tune of “Sweet Caroline”)

Adonai said,
"I never will forget you.
I will make Pharaoh set you free.
”Now here we are,
drinking the wine we savor
As we recall our slavery.

(Chorus)

Hands…pouring wine,
Reaching out, red for me, white for you.
Sweet kosher wine,
(bum, bum, bum)
You make seders seem so good
(so good, so good, so good)
We all recline
And we drink you like we should.

Adonai said,
“If you can learn to trust me
Then in the end you’ll just be fine.
Now here we are,
all of these long years later
Drinking our favorite seder wine.

(Repeat chorus)

© 2012 Barbara Sarshik

Kadesh
Source : (On Shabbat, add the following before the Kiddush)

Kadesh

All Jewish celebrations, from holidays to weddings, include wine as a symbol of our joy – not to mention a practical way to increase that joy. The seder starts with wine and then gives us three more opportunities to refill our cup and drink.

The Hebrew word “Kiddush” means sanctification. But it is not the wine we sanctify. Instead, the wine is a symbol of the sanctity, the preciousness, and the sweetness of this moment. Held together by sacred bonds of family, friendship, peoplehood, we share this table tonight with one another and with all the generations who have come before us. Let us rise, and sanctify this singular moment.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine. We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who chose us from all peoples and languages, and sanctified us with commandments, and lovingly gave to us special times for happiness, holidays and this time of celebrating the Holiday of Matzah, the time of liberation, reading our sacred stories, and remembering the Exodus from Egypt. For you chose us and sanctified us among all peoples. And you have given us joyful holidays. We praise God, who sanctifies the people of Israel and the holidays.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, שֶׁהֶחֱיָנוּ וְקִיְּמָנוּ וְהִגִּיעָנוּ לַזְּמַן הַזֶּה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, she-hechiyanu v’key’manu v’higiyanu lazman hazeh.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who has kept us alive, raised us up, and brought us to this happy moment. Drink the first glass of wine!

Kadesh
Source : reformjudaism.org

Baruch atah, Adonai Eloheinu, Melech haolam, shehecheyanu v’kiy’manu v’higianu laz’man hazeh.

Praise to You, Adonai our God, spirit of the universe, for giving us life, for sustaining us, and for enabling us to reach this season.

Drink the first cup of wine.

Urchatz
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com
Water is refreshing, cleansing, and clear, so it’s easy to understand why so many cultures and religions use water for symbolic purification. We will wash our hands twice during our seder: now, with no blessing, to get us ready for the rituals to come; and then again later, we’ll wash again with a blessing, preparing us for the meal, which Judaism thinks of as a ritual in itself. (The Jewish obsession with food is older than you thought!)

To wash your hands, you don’t need soap, but you do need a cup to pour water over your hands. Pour water on each of your hands three times, alternating between your hands. If the people around your table don’t want to get up to walk all the way over to the sink, you could pass a pitcher and a bowl around so everyone can wash at their seats… just be careful not to spill!

Too often during our daily lives we don’t stop and take the moment to prepare for whatever it is we’re about to do.

Let's pause to consider what we hope to get out of our evening together tonight. Go around the table and share one hope or expectation you have for tonight's seder.

Urchatz

I Want to Wash My Hands
(to the tune of “I Want to Hold Your Hand” by The Beatles)

Oh yeah, I’ll tell you something
It’s one of God’s commands
That when you start the Seder
You need to wash your hands
You need to wash your hands
You need to wash your hands

Oh my, what a feeling
For all the Pesach fans
And yes it’s so appealing
I want to wash my hands
I want to wash my hands
I want to wash my hands

And as we wash them, we all say the Barechu
I’ll pass the bowl around and say
It’s on to you, it’s on to you, it’s on to you

So, yeah, you got us praying
To reach the Promised Land
Hear this, what we’re conveying
We want to wash our hands
We want to wash our hands
We want to wash our hands

Karpas

(Sung to the Tune "Sounds of Silence)

Hello family, hello friends
I've come to talk with you again
This salty water sitting over here
It represents the Toiling Jewish tears
That they shed, as they worked for Pharoah's men
Remember when
As you dip your parsley

Karpas

(By Gary Teblum, sung to the tune of “White Christmas’)

I’m dipping greens in salt water
Just like I did the year before
Greens remind of springtime
and parsley’s so fine
While salt echoes tears, you know.

I’m dipping greens in salt water
Just like I did the year before
May your greens be dipped with each bite
As you join together Pesach night.

I’m dipping greens in salt water
Just like I did the year before
May your greens be dipped with each bite
As you join together Pesach night.

Karpas
Source : Rabbi Michael Learner

The saltwater on our table traditionally represents the tears of the Israelite slaves. The green vegetables we dip in the water suggest the possibility of growth and renewal even in the midst of grief.

The greens on the table also remind us of our commitment to protect the planet from ecological destruction. Instead of focusing narrowly on what we may “realistically” accomplish in today’s world, we must refocus the conversation on what the planet needs in order to survive and flourish. We must get out of the narrow place in our thinking and look at the world not as a resource, but as a focus for awe, wonder, and amazement. We must reject the societal story that identifies success and progress with endless growth and accumulation of things. Instead we will focus on acknowledging that we already have enough; we need to stop exploiting our resources and instead care for the earth.

We are descended from slaves, people who staged the first successful slave rebellion in recorded history. Ever since, our people has kept alive the story of liberation, and the consciousness that cruelty and oppression are not inevitable “facts of life” but conditions that can be changed.

The task may seem more overwhelming to us today than in previous moments. Today there is no longer some easily identifiable external evil force playing the role of Pharaoh. Instead, we live in an increasingly unified global economic and political system that brings well-being to some even as it increases the misery of others.

We are in the midst of a huge spiritual and environmental crisis. Our society has lost its way. Yet most of us are even embarrassed to talk about this seriously, so certain are we that we could never do anything to transform this reality, and fearful that we will be met with cynicism and derision for even allowing ourselves to think about challenging the kind of technocratic and alienating rationality that parades itself as “progress” in the current world.

Affirming that, we dip the greens on our Seder plate in joy at the beauty and goodness of this earth and its vegetation, and recommitting ourselves to do all we can to stop those processes in our society that are contributing to the destruction of the earth.

Karpas

We will now say the blessing over the Karpas. The parsley symbolizes the humble beginnings of the Jewish people and the rebirth of spring. The salt water represents the tears shed during slavery. 

Yachatz

Breaking the Middle Matzah
By Gary Teblum, sung to the tune of “Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer”)

You know Kiddush and Candles
And parsley and motzi,
Bad plagues and questions
And maror and hotzi.

But do you recall
The most famous custom of all?

Breaking the middle matzah
Into the bag it goes
Then when the leader hids it
Face of each kinder glows

While clearing all the dishes
Children laugh and search for same
Trying so hard to find it
That’s the afikomen game

To our little cousin Josh
We did come to say
Joshy with your hands so small
Won't you reach behind the wall

Then Joshy found the matzah
And we shouted out with glee
Turn in the Afikomen
For some gelt for you and me

Yachatz

We break the middle matzah into two pieces.  We wrap and set aside the larger piece as the Afikomen, the desert matzah to be eaten at the end of the mea.  The smaller piece of matzah is returned to its place with  the other two.

(Uncover the plate of matzah and raise it for all to see)

This is the bread of poverty which our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt.  All who are hungry, come and eat.  All who are needy, come and celebrate Passover with us.  Now we celebrate here.  Next year may we be in the land of Israel.  Now we are slaves.  Next year may we be truly free.

(Fill the wine cups for the second time)    
 

Maggid - Beginning
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

Pour the second glass of wine for everyone.

The Haggadah doesn’t tell the story of Passover in a linear fashion. We don’t hear of Moses being found by the daughter of Pharaoh – actually, we don’t hear much of Moses at all. Instead, we get an impressionistic collection of songs, images, and stories of both the Exodus from Egypt and from Passover celebrations through the centuries. Some say that minimizing the role of Moses keeps us focused on the miracles God performed for us. Others insist that we keep the focus on the role that every member of the community has in bringing about positive change.

Maggid - Beginning
Maggid - Beginning

Avadim Hayinu (sung to the tune of "When you wish upon a star”)

Avadim Ha yinu Atah B'Nai Chorim Avadim Hayi-e nu B'Nai Chorim

We were slaves in Egypt once But today, yes we are free We were slaves in Egypt once But now we're free.

Maggid - Beginning
Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses (to the tune of "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious")

Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses The story of the Passover our Seder meal discloses Reminds us that the life of slaves was not a bed of roses Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses

Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ai Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ai

The Jews were bound in Egypt and were feeling rather low So Moses went to Pharaoh and said “Let my people go.” Pharoah said “Be gone with you,” which wasn’t very nice So God commenced a run of plagues including frogs and lice.

Oh, Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses The story of the Passover our Seder meal discloses We will eat gefilte fish, though some will hold their noses Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses

Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ai Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ai

The plagues were unrelenting and included hail and boils Not to mention dreadful fates for Egypt's boys and goils. Pharaoh he surrendered, then with slightly soggy feet The Jews walked to their freedom and that’s it, come on, let’s eat!

Oh, Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses The story of the Passover our Seder meal discloses Finish the Haggadah before anybody dozes Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses

Maggid - Beginning

Yesterday
(sung to the tune of "Yesterday")
by Gary Teblum

Yesterday
We were slaves in Egypt yesterday
Now be thankful that we’re free today
We must remember yesterday

Slavery
Pharoah kept us all in slavery
We were working hard as hard can be
Oh yesterday saw slavery

Why we couldn’t go, I don’t know
He made us stay
Then God set us free
Now we teach ‘bout yesterday

Yesterday
We were brought forth so that we could pray
Now I need to teach the kids to say
We must remember yesterday

Why we couldn’t go, I don’t know
He made us stay
Then God set us free
Now we teach ‘bout yesterday

Yesterday
We were brought forth so that we could pray
At the seder, teach the kids to say
Why we remember yesterday

Maggid - Beginning

Baruch hamakom, baruch hu. Baruch hamakom, baruch hu.
Baruch shenatan torah le'amo yisrael, baruch hu.

בָּרוּךְ הַמָּקוֹם, בָּרוּךְ הוּא. בָּרוּךְ שֶׁנָּתַן תּוֹרָה לְעַמּוֹ יִשְׂרָאֵל, בָּרוּךְ הוּא.

Translation:

Blessed is Adonai; Blessed is He.
Bless​ed is the One Who gave the Torah to His people Israel; Blessed is He.

-- Four Questions

Oh, On This Night
(sung to the tune of Oh What A Night - The Four Seasons)
(by Gary Teblum)

Oh, on this night
Things are different because we’re free
Why a change from what we normally see
We ask questions ‘bout this night

Oh, on this night,
We can only eat unleavened bread
Other nights, it’s either way we’re fed
Yes it’s matzah on this night

On other nights,
Every single type of herb is fine
But tonight, on bitter herbs we dine
Why restricted, on this night

We ask these questions as a kinder full of wonder
We’re singing the ma nistanah and so hoping not to blunder

Oh, on this night,
We dip twice as the Haggadah calls
Other nights, we may not dip at all
It’s two dippings on this night

On other nights,
We sit or we can recline to eat
But tonight, we just recline our seat
Why restricted, on this night

We ask these questions as a kinder full of wonder
We’re singing the ma nistanah and so hoping not to blunder.

Oh, on this night.

-- Four Questions

Four Questions
(Robyn Shoulson, Passover 2012 "The Street where you live," from “My Fair Lady”)

I have often sat, for a meal before,
But there's something here tonight I didn't feel before,
And so what has changed
That it feels so strange?
Why is this meal so different tonight?

Where's those fluffy rolls, that I like to eat,
That I always like to dip in gravy with the meat?
Now there's Matza – flat,
Dry and crumbly.
Just one way that it’s different tonight.

And oh! Those wonderful greens plates –
Steamed, sauteéd, or frittered or plain.
Tonight, we remember our mean state,
We eat bitter herbs – horseradish or romaine.

We have dips tonight – no, not the salsa plate.
And we're sitting at an angle (not upright and straight).
These are only four,
Yet I'm sure there's more
Things so strange and so different tonight!

-- Four Questions

The Four Questions

(Tune of ―I‘d do anything‖ from Oliver)

Why, on Seder night
Are things just not quite right?
The changes are just slight
This night.

It seems the things we always do
Are just a bit askew
And they don't quite ring true
Tonight.

Every night we eat lots of bread,
But tonight it's Matzah instead.
And the vegetables we are fed
Now are bitter herbs – (which) we all dread!

Why, on Seder night
Are things just not quite right?
The changes are just slight
This night.

It seems the things we always do
Are just a bit askew
And they don't quite ring true
Tonight.

We're not used to dip when we dine.
Now we dip two times - once in brine.
Every night we sit up just fine,
But tonight we all ... have to recline!

Why, on Seder night
Are things just not quite right?
The changes are just slight
This night.

It seems the things we always do
Are just a bit askew
So tell me why we do,
So much new - Tonight?

-- Four Questions
-- Four Children
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

As we tell the story, we think about it from all angles. Our tradition speaks of four different types of children who might react differently to the Passover seder. It is our job to make our story accessible to all the members of our community, so we think about how we might best reach each type of child:

What does the wise child say?

The wise child asks, What are the testimonies and laws which God commanded you?

You must teach this child the rules of observing the holiday of Passover.

What does the wicked child say?

The wicked child asks, What does this service mean to you?

To you and not to himself! Because he takes himself out of the community and misses the point, set this child’s teeth on edge and say to him: “It is because of what God did for me in taking me out of Egypt.” Me, not him. Had that child been there, he would have been left behind.

What does the simple child say?

The simple child asks, What is this?

To this child, answer plainly: “With a strong hand God took us out of Egypt, where we were slaves.”

What about the child who doesn’t know how to ask a question?

Help this child ask.

Start telling the story:

“It is because of what God did for me in taking me out of Egypt.”

-

Do you see yourself in any of these children? At times we all approach different situations like each of these children. How do we relate to each of them?

-- Four Children

The Four Sons
(sung to the tune of "Let's Go Fly a Kite")

There's a father with sons numbered four
He explains the tale and the lore
As he tries to relate
A story that is great
It's what G-d did for me
As he made us all free.

Oh, Oh, Oh
First, there's the son with smarts
He understands the part
That he plays when we
Retell the story.

Tell him about the laws
Don't give it any pause
Oh, that's why he's astute.

The wicked one's son number two
Asking what this all means to you
Himself he excludes
You must answer the dude
It's what G-d did for me
As he made us all free.

Oh Oh Oh
The simple son he's not so keen
He asks what this all means
You must tell him plainly
That which happened
How G-d's mighty hand
Took us out of the land
So that we might be free.

The fourth son may seem somewhat rough
Because he does not know enough
To ask any question about what we know
You must teach him each year
Til it's perfectly clear.

Oh Oh Oh
Passover -- celebrate
Remembering our fate
G-d did much for us
When we were in Egypt
Freeing us from slavery
Now we all can see
G-d led us to be free

-- Four Children

Abbott:  Well Costello, the seder is sure going great tonight.
Costello:  Oh yes, Abbott, it certainly is with the great company and everything.
Abbott:  You know, at our seder last night we had a great time with the four children.  We gave them all names.
Costello:  You gave the children names?  That sounds like fun. Can you tell me the names?
Abbott:  Oh, I’ll tell you their names, but you know strange as it may seem, we gave these children some interesting names.
Costello:  You mean funny names?
Abbott:  Strange names, pet names.  Well let’s see, we have Who’s the wise child, What’s the wicked child,
and I Don’t Know is the simple child.
Costello:  That’s what I want to find out.
Abbott:  I say, Who’s the wise, What’s the wicked, and I Don’t Know’s the simple.

Costello:  Was it your seder?
Abbott:  Yes.
Costello:  And this was with your family?
Abbott:  Yes.
Costello:  And you don’t  know the children’s names?
Abbott:  Well I should.
Costello:  Well then who is wise?
Abbott:  Yes.
Costello:  I mean the child’s name.
Abbott:  Who.
Costello:  The wise child.
Abbott:  Who.
Costello:  The wise child.
Abbott:  Who!
Costello:  The child that is the wise one.
Abbott:  Who is the wise child.
Costello:  I’m asking you who’s wise!
Abbott:  That’s the child’s name.
Costello:  That’s whose name?
Abbott:  Yes.
Costello:  Well go ahead and tell me.
Abbott:  That’s it.
Costello:  That’s who?
Abbott:  Yes.

(Pause) Costello:  Look, you got a wise child.
Abbott:  Certainly.
Costello:  Who’s the wise child?
Abbott:  That’s right.
Costello:  When you start the four children you talk about who?
Abbott:  Talk about him right out of the book.
Costello:  All I’m trying to find out is the child’s name that is the wise one.
Abbott:  Who.
Costello:  The child you read about first.
Abbott:  That’s it.
Costello:  Who gets read about?
Abbott:  He does!

(Pause) Costello:  All I’m trying to find out is what’s the name of the wise child.
Abbott:  No, what’s the wicked child.
Costello:  I’m not asking who’s the wicked child.
Abbott:  Who is the wise child!
Costello:  One child at a time!

Abbott:  Well don’t change the children around!
Costello:  I’m not changing nobody!
Abbott:  Take it easy, buddy.
Costello:  All I’m asking you, who’s the wise child?!
Abbott:  That’s right.
Costello:  Okay.
Abbott:  Alright.

(Pause) Costello:  What’s the name of the wise child?!
Abbott:  No, What is the wicked child!
Costello:  I’m not asking you who’s the wicked child!
Abbott:  Who’s the wise child.
Costello:  I don’t know.
Abbott:  Oh, that’s the simple child. We’re not talking about him.  Now let’s get back to the wise child.
Costello:  Now how did I get to the simple child?
Abbott:  Well you mentioned his name.
Costello:  If I mentioned the simple child’s name, who did I say’s the simple child?
Abbott:  No, Who’s the wise child.
Costello:  What’s wise?
Abbott:  What’s wicked.
Costello:  I don’t know.
Abbott:  He’s simple.
Costello:  There I go, back to simple again! Will you stay on the simple child and don’t go off him?
Abbott:  Alright, what do you want to know?
Costello:  Now who’s the simple child?!
Abbott:  Why do you insist on making Who the simple child?
Costello:  What am I putting as the simple child?!
Abbott:  No, What is the wicked child.
Costello:  You don’t want who to be the wicked child?!
Abbott:  No, Who is the wise child.
Costello:  I don’t know!
Both:  Simple child!

(Pause) Costello: You know, I know how to read the haggadah too.
Abbott:  So they tell me.
Costello:  So let’s say it’s the seder at your house.
Abbott:  Yes.
Costello:  So now I’m reading the haggadah and we get to the part about the four children. So I start reading about the wise child and I read about who?
Abbott:  Now that’s the first thing that you’ve said right.
Costello:  I don’t even know what I’m talking about!

Abbott:  Well that’s all you have to do!
Costello:  Is read about the wise child?
Abbott:  Yes.
Costello:  And I read about who?
Abbott:  Naturally.

(Pause) Costello:  Look, if I read about the wise child I got to read about someone. Now who gets read about?
Abbott:  Naturally.
Costello:  Who?
Abbott:  Naturally.
Costello:  Naturally?
Abbott:  Naturally.

Costello:  So I read about Naturally?
Abbott:  No you don’t! You read about Who!
Costello:  Naturally.
Abbott:  That’s different.
Costello:  That’s what I said.
Abbott:  You’re not saying that.
Costello:  I read about Naturally?
Abbott:  You read about Who.
Costello:  Naturally.
Abbott:  That’s it.
Costello:  That’s what I said!

Abbott:  Listen, you ask me.
Costello:  I read about who?
Abbott:  Naturally.

Costello:  Now you ask me.
Abbott:  You read about Who?
Costello:  Naturally.
Abbott:  That’s it.
Costello:  Same as you!
Abbott:  You just changed them around.
Costello:  Same as you! I read about who. Whoever it is gets read about and we move on to what and I don’t know!
Abbott:  Yes.
Costello:  Why? I don’t know, he’s the simple child, and I don’t give a darn!
Abbott:  Oh…What?
Costello:  I said, I don’t give a darn!
Abbott:  Oh, that’s the name of the child that does not know how to ask.
Costello:  (Fumbles words loudly)

-- Exodus Story
Source : CSJO: Congress of Secular Jewish Organization

The story of the Exodus has been told to us by our parents, just as their parents told them. We now repeat the story in hopes that this will pass on to the next generation.

The ancient Hebrews came to Egypt from their land to get provisions during a famine. They became a favored group in Egypt and prospered and multiplied there. Legend tells us that our ancestor Joseph, who was sold into slavery by his brothers, became valuable to Pharaoh for his foresight and wisdom. Because of this, his people were welcomed. When new rulers came to power, the Hebrews fell out of favor and were enslaved. Despite their hardships, the Hebrew people survived and grew in numbers. The new Pharaoh became concerned that they would unite with Egypt's enemies.

At one point the Pharaoh ordered that all newborn male babies be killed. The parents of one boy were determined to save their child and they made a basket so the baby would float in the water.

The baby’s sister, Miriam, took the basket to the river. While she hid nearby, she floated the basket downstream so that her brother would be discovered by the Pharaoh's daughter who bathed there every day.

When the Pharaoh's daughter saw the baby in the water she decided to save him and raise him as her own son. While wondering who would be his wet nurse, Miriam appeared and suggested Yocheved, the baby's mother. The Pharaoh's daughter agreed and decided that she would call him Moses, because the name means "I brought him from the river's water."

Many years passed and this man named Moses, who had been brought up as an Egyptian prince, saw an overseer brutally whipping an enslaved Hebrew. This so enraged him, that he struck the overseer and killed him. Moses fled to nearby Midian where he became a shepherd and married Zipporah.

His was a tranquil life, but the thought of the persecuted Hebrews in Egypt would not let Moses rest. The legend tells us that an angel appeared to Moses in a miraculously burning bush and commanded him to return to Egypt and help his people regain their freedom.

After much indecision, Moses finally went back to Egypt and he and his brother Aaron began to talk to the Hebrews in order to arouse a spirit of rebellion in them. Many were, at first, hesitant and afraid, but soon they became convinced of the justice of their cause and agreed to follow Moses's plan of liberation. Moses pleaded with the Pharaoh to let his people go. The Pharaoh refused to let the Hebrews go free. Tradition tells us that ten plagues then struck the land of Egypt.

-- Exodus Story

Why You Are Here


(Sung to the Tune of “YMCA”)

Moses, it is me in the bush. I said
Moses, well, you just need a push. I said
Moses, just a whack on the tush,
And you’ll make your people happy.

Moses, you’ve been lucky from birth. I said
Moses, you were put on this earth. I said
Moses, you can show what you’re worth,
You can make your people happy.

(Chorus)

I want to tell you now
Why You Are Here.
I want to tell you now
Why You Are Here.
He’s done everything just to ruin their joy.
He has taken their first born boys.

I want to tell you now
Why You Are Here.
I want to tell you now
Why You Are Here.
Moses, don’t be a schmo.
When the Pharaoh says no, tell him
Let all my people go.

Moses, all your people are slaves, I said
Moses, and they have to be saved, I said
Moses, you wil have to be brave.
You can make your people happy.

Moses, soon your people will be. I said
Moses, they’ll be happy and free. I said
Moses, they will cross the Red Sea.
You can make your people happy.

(Repeat Chorus)

-- Exodus Story

I Just Can’t Go to the King
(to the tune of “I Just Can’t Wait To Be King” from The Lion King

(Moses)
I’m gonna see a mighty king.
I’m feeling mighty scared.

(Aaron)
Well, Moses, I’ll be there with you
So you’ll be well prepared.

(Moses)
I’ve never been too good with words.
I stutter and I squeak.
My hands are wet, my throat is dry
Each time I try to speak.

(Aaron)
Well, Moses, don’t be scared about a thing.

(Moses)
Oh, I just can’t go to the king!
I’ll be saying, “Do this.”
I’ll be saying, “See them.”
I’ll be saying, “Stop that.”
I’ll be saying, “Free them.
Free them all to leave today.
Free them all to live God’s way.”

(Aaron)
The Pharaoh needs to know he needs to
Have a change of heart.
Or God will make his cows get sick
And make the Red Sea part.

(Both)
The two of us will go tell Pharaoh,
“Let my people go.”
We know exactly what we’ll do if
Pharaoh tells us no.

We’ll warn him of the plagues that God will bring.

Oh, we’re both gonna go to the king!
We’ll be saying, “Do this.”
We’ll be saying, “See them.”
We’ll be saying, “Stop that.”
We’ll be saying, “Free them.”

“Have respect for every living thing.
Pharaoh, don’t be such a dingaling.”

Now this will be our final time to sing:
Oh, we’re both gonna go to the king!

©2008 Barbara Sarshik

-- Exodus Story
Source : (c) Barbara Sarchik

(Sung to the tune of “If I Only Had a Brain”)

I have come to tell you clearly
To let you know sincerely
My people suffer so.
God has sent me to order
Stop the bricks and the mortar
You must let my people go.

If you don’t let them skedaddle,
You’ll have some real sick cattle
And a frog will bite your toe.
All the common folks and royals
Will be breaking out in boils.
You must let my people go.

Oh yes, we’re in a mess
But this is just a phase.
God will bring the Hebrew people better days
And, Pharaoh, you’ll change your ways.

You’re afraid that the Egyptians
Will have some big conniptions
Should you change the status quo
In the end, you’ll have to do it
So you might as well get to it.
You must let my people go.

-- Exodus Story

Let Them Go, Let Them Go, Let Them Go
By Gary Teblum
(sung to the tune of “Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow)


Well, the bondage of Pharoah was frightful
And the pleas of Moses were rightful
But since God sent plagues, you know
Let them go, let them go, let them go

Oh, they didn’t have time for baking
So instead it’s Matzah they’re making
And since God sent plagues, you know
Let them go, let them go, let them go

When they finally said goodnight,
Marking blood so to save their first born
And soon they will need to take flight,
As they rise up in the morn.

There’s soon to be no more crying,
As they leave from Pharoah’s lying,
Yes, since God sent plagues, you know,
Let them go, let them go, let them go.

-- Exodus Story

I Will Not Let Them Go
(sung to the tune of "Hi-Ho, Hi-Ho,")

Oh no, Oh no
I will not let them go
I will not let the Jews go free
Oh no, Oh no, Oh no.

Oh No, Oh no.
I will not let them go
Your people will not leave this land
Oh no, Oh no.

-- Exodus Story

Hardened Heart (Sung to the tune of “A Hard Day’s Night”) (by Gary Teblum)

He had a hardened heart
And he would not let us go
He had a hardened heart
And here’s what you should know

Each time a plague did them in
Moshe thought he would win
But Pharoah’s mind stood tight

You they know slaved all day
Building the pyramids was their thing
And they waited for Moshe to say
I’ve heard from Pharoah as the king

Though every day they would moan
Soon they could put down that stone
And they would feel okay

To our home,
that’s where we’re headed tonight
A new home,
get there and we’ll be alright, Yeh

He had a hardened heart
And he would not let us go
He had a hardened heart
And here’s what you should know

Each time a plague did them in
Moshe thought he would win
But Pharoah’s mind stood tight

Though every day they would moan
Soon they could put down that stone
And they would feel okay

To our home,
that’s where we’re headed tonight
A new home,
get there and we’ll be alright, Yeh

-- Exodus Story

We Will Survive
Lyrics by Anna Morrison Markowitz
(Sung to the tune of Gloria Gaynor’s “I Will Survive”)

Moses:

First I was afraid -
I was petrified.
Kept thinking I’m just not a public speaking kind of guy.
But then I spent too many nights
Seeing how you’d done them wrong,
And I grew strong.
Yes, I learned how to get along!

Pharoah:

So now you’re here,
Back in my face.
You’ve brought us pestilence and famine,
Now I want you off my case!
I should have let your people go,
When the locusts ate our grain.
Now our firstborn have been taken,
And you’ve caused us so much pain!

Go on now, go!
Walk out the door.
Don’t turn around now -
You’re not welcome anymore.
Weren’t you the lousy ingrates
Who bit  the hand that held your pie?
Without me, you know you’ll crumble -
That you’ll all lay down and die!

CHORUS:

No, we’ve got Chai -
We will survive!
As long as we are trusting in our G-d
We know we’ll stay alive.
Our numbers, they'll be countless
As the stars up in the sky.
Yes, we’ll survive…
We will survive!

Moses:

It took all the strength we had,
Not to fall apart.
Now G-d has heard the weeping
Of our broken hearts.
You know we spent too many years
Sweating, hungry, and abused
We used to cry -
But now we hold our heads up high!

So now you’ll see
Somebody new.
We’re not that chained up little people
Once enslaved by you.

So if you decide you'll chase us,
Don’t expect it to be free.
Our G-d will surely save us,
Guide us through the parted sea!

Pharoah:

Go on now, go!
Walk out the door.
Don’t turn around now -
You’re not welcome anymore.
Weren’t you the lousy ingrates
Who bit the hand that held your pie?
Without me, you know you’ll crumble
Yeah, you’ll lay down and die!

CHORUS:

No, we’ve got Chai -
We will survive!
As long as we are trusting in our G-d
We know we’ll stay alive.
Our numbers, they'll be countless
As the stars up in the sky.
Yes, we’ll survive…
We will survive!

Yeah, we’ve got Chai -
We will survive!
These miracles of freedom
G-d delivered long ago -
Still we tell them to our children,
So the story they will know.
We will survive!
We have survived!!!!

HEY, HEY!

-- Ten Plagues
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

As we rejoice at our deliverance from slavery, we acknowledge that our freedom was hard-earned. We regret that our freedom came at the cost of the Egyptians’ suffering, for we are all human beings made in the image of God. We pour out a drop of wine for each of the plagues as we recite them.

Dip a finger or a spoon into your wine glass for a drop for each plague.

These are the ten plagues which God brought down on the Egyptians:

Blood | dam | דָּם

Frogs | tzfardeiya |  צְפַרְדֵּֽעַ

Lice | kinim | כִּנִּים

Beasts | arov | עָרוֹב

Cattle disease | dever | דֶּֽבֶר

Boils | sh’chin | שְׁחִין

Hail | barad | בָּרָד

Locusts | arbeh | אַרְבֶּה

Darkness | choshech | חֹֽשֶׁךְ

Death of the Firstborn | makat b’chorot | מַכַּת בְּכוֹרוֹת

The Egyptians needed ten plagues because after each one they were able to come up with excuses and explanations rather than change their behavior. Could we be making the same mistakes? Make up your own list. What are the plagues in your life? What are the plagues in our world today? What behaviors do we need to change to fix them? 

-- Ten Plagues

Frogs
(the new version)
(to the tune of " Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah,")

Frogs on his nose now
Frogs in his hair
My oh my
There were frogs everywhere.

Plenty of jumping
All round his bed
Pharaoh was feeling
Frogs round his head.

Mister bullfrog on his shoulder
It's the truth
It's frightnin'
All these plagues are knuckle whitenin'.

Frogs on his toes now
What do you say
Terrible feeling,
Terrible day.

-- Ten Plagues

Basic Children’s Frog Song

One day king Pharaoh awoke in his bed,
There were frogs in his bed and frogs on his head.
Frogs on his nose and frogs on his toes.
Frogs here, frogs there,
Frogs were jumping everywhere.

-- Ten Plagues

The 10 Plagues of Pesach
by Gary Teblum
(Sung to the tune of The Twelve Days of Christmas)


For the first plague of Pesach, Pharoah came to see
A river that was all blood-y

For the second plague of Pesach, Pharoah came to see
Green jumping frogs
And a river that was all blood-y

For the third plague of Pesach, Pharoah came to see
Big white lice
Green jumping frogs
And a river that was all blood-y

For the fourth plague of Pesach, Pharoah came to see
Wild scary beasts
Big white lice
Green jumping frogs
And a river that was all blood-y

For the fifth plague of Pesach, Pharoah came to see
{Slow}
Cows with disease {Pause}
Wild scary beasts
Big white lice
Green jumping frogs
And a river that was all blood-y

For the sixth plague of Pesach, Pharoah came to see
Boils causing itching
{Slow}
Cows with disease {Pause}
Wild scary beasts
Big white lice
Green jumping frogs
And a river that was all blood-y

For the seventh plague of Pesach, Pharoah came to see
Hail big as golf balls
Boils causing itching
{Slow}
Cows with disease {Pause}
Wild scary beasts
Big white lice
Green jumping frogs
And a river that was all blood-y

For the eighth plague of Pesach, Pharoah came to see
Tons of flying locusts
Hail big as golf balls
Boils causing itching
{Slow}
Cows with disease {Pause}
Wild scary beasts
Big white lice
Green jumping frogs
And a river that was all blood-y

For the ninth plague of Pesach, Pharoah came to see
Days of pure darkness
Tons of flying locusts
Hail big as golf balls
Boils causing itching
{Slow}
Cows with disease {Pause}
Wild scary beasts
Big white lice
Green jumping frogs
And a river that was all blood-y

For the tenth plague of Pesach, Pharoah came to see
Death of the first born
Days of pure darkness
Tons of flying locusts
Hail big as golf balls
Boils causing itching
{Slow}
Cows with disease {Pause}
Wild scary beasts
Big white lice
Green jumping frogs
And a river that was all blood-y

-- Ten Plagues

Eser Makkot (The Ten Plagues) (Sung to the tune of “Michelle”) (by Gary Teblum)

Es-ser Makkot
hese are plagues of which we must take note
ser Makkot

Es-ser Makkot
Blood and frogs and lice and cattle disease
attle disease

Please free them, please free them, please free them
that's what God tried to say
ut Pharoah wouldn’t sway
t was not until that tenth plague came that he’d understand

Es-ser Makkot
Locusts, hail and darkness o’er the land
Over the land

God needs to, God needs to, God needs to
od needs to make Pharoah see
h, what might come to be

Until we jews give him the blues,
Pharoah, he’ll be mean

We hate you

Please free them, please free them, please them
You should know by now
You’ll let them go some how
Until you do new plagues will brew
so you’ll understand

Es-ser Makkot
Blood and frogs and lice and first borns did die
First borns did die

And you will say the only words we want for you to understand
Go from my land.

-- Ten Plagues

Hey, Frogs (sung to the tune of “Hey Jude”) (by Gary Teblum)

Hey frogs, please go away
You’re a bad plague that gets no better
Miztrayim is suffering from this plague
If I relent, will it get better?

Hey frogs, I’m now afraid
You were put here to make us suffer
Your jumping is getting under my skin
Now I need Moshe
to make it better

And all the time I feel the pain
Hey frogs refrain
Don’t infest my world and all our households

For well you know, I’d be a fool to play it cool
By keeping the Jews a little longer
Na na na na na na na na na

Hey frogs, don’t jump around
Yet when you leave, I’ll get bad weather
Miztrayim is suffering from this plague
If I relent, will it get better?

So get on out and get me in
Hey frogs, you win
I’m telling Moshe to take his people

And don't you know that it’s just you
Hey frogs, it’s true
You’re jumping around, about my shoulder
Na na na na na na na na na yeah

Hey frogs, please go away
You’re a bad plague that gets no better
Miztrayim is suffering from this plague
If I relent, will it get better?

Better, better, better, better, better,
oh Na, na na na na na na na na na na, hey frogs
Na, na na na na na na na na na na, hey frogs

-- Ten Plagues

Dom, Dom, This Plague is Red
(sung to the sung of Ding Dong, the Witch is Dead)
(by Gary Teblum)

Dom, Dom, this plague is red
Which bad plague
The bloody plague
Dom, Dom, the plague of blood is red

Pharoah – hear what I said
Let them go, or you’ll be dead.
Pharoah, the plague of blood is red.

The Nile will turn to blood
Oh no, that’s worse than flood
Yo-ho, yo ho, yo ho
Don’t cling, just let them all out.

Dom, Dom, you’ll worry so
Don’t ask why, just let us go.
Don’t you know the plague of blood is red!

-- Ten Plagues

Those Were the Plagues
words by Doug Ballon
to the tune of “Those Were the Days” by Gene Raskin

Once upon a time in Pharaoh’s palace,
Mo’ and Aaron raised a rod or two.
Remember how they brought ten plagues on Egypt,
Until the tyrant said that he was through.

Chorus:

Those were the plagues my friend, we thought they’d bring an end,
To hauling bricks we made of straw and clay.
Pharaoh was dealt a blow, and let our people go,
So we were free and sure to have our way!
Yi di di di di di, Yi di di di di di
Those were the plagues, oh yes, those were the plagues.

First, God made the water turn all bloody—
The fishes in the Nile did rather stink.
Rivers, ponds and even bowls turned cruddy,
And not a single drop was left to drink.
The second plague of frogs turned out no better,
With bouncy little critters all around.
The only ones that lived were in the river—
The rest became a big green, smelly mound!

Chorus

Moses and the Lord kept pressing Pharaoh—
With lice, and flies, and then a cattle blight.
Boils and hail and locusts didn’t sway him,
And then God made the day as dark as night.
On the door we finally smeared some lamb’s blood,
And prepared the first Passover feast.
The Lord struck down the first-born throughout Egypt—
Sparing not a child nor any beast.

Chorus

-- Ten Plagues

The Ten Plagues
(sung to the tune of the "Adam's Family" theme song)

They're creepy and they're yucky
They're altogether ucky
They're so completley mucky
We're talking 'bout the Plagues.

The Nile turned to blood
Which was far worse than mud
Then frogs and lice and crud
The start of the Ten Plagues.

Next beasts, blight, and boils
On commoners and royals
Then hail and locusts spoiled
The country. It was wrecked.

Then Egypt drowned in darkness
The country was a big mess
All chaos, as you can guess
Pharaoh could not protect.

The last plague was the worst
The first-born sons were cursed
Their parent's hearts were burst
And Pharaoh let us go.

Each year we tell the story
Although this part is gory
It still speaks of God's glory
Remember the Ten Plagues.

Our cups are filled with wine
The joy with which we dine
Our joy is far less fine
When we remember the Ten Plagues.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

CROSSING THE SEA

Soon after Pharaoh let the Israelites leave Egypt, he regretted his
decision and ordered his army to bring them back. His soldiers
caught up with the Israelites by the banks of the Sea of Reeds.
When they saw the Egyptians, they were afraid and cried out.
Adonai told Moses to lift his rod, and when he did, a strong east
wind drove back the sea, leaving space for the Israelites to go
across on dry land. The Egyptians came after them into the sea.
Moses again lifted his rod, and the waters rushed back, covering
the Egyptians and their horses and chariots.

Then Moses' sister Miriam led the women in joyous dance and
song, thanking Adonai for saving their lives. 

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

(sung to the tune of “Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?”)

Tonight my back is breaking.
My arms and legs are aching.
Tonight I cry in pain and misery,
Will we be leaving Mitzrayim?

I need to know if Your love
Is the love I can be sure of.
Can I believe my people will be free?
Will we be leaving Mitzrayim?

Tonight some guy named Moses
Tells us that You’re the only one.
He says when this night closes
We’ll be free
in the morning sun.

Is Moses just a schemer?
Is he a foolish dreamer?
So tell me now, and I won’t ask again.
Will we be leaving Mitzrayim?

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

Follow This Fellow Named Mo
(sung to the tune of Follow the Yellow Brick Road)
(by Gary Teblum)

Follow this fellow named Mo.  Follow this fellow named Mo
Follow this fellow quick, follow this fellow quick
Follow this fellow named mo.

If ever a fellow to track there was, this fellow named mo is one because
Because, because, because, because, because.
Because of the wonderful things he does.

We're set to leave this Pharoah, this terrible Pharoah of ours.

You'll find he is
A rogue of a rogue.
If ever a rogue there was.
If ever oh ever a rogue there was, this Pharoah of ours is one because,
Because, because, because, because, because.
Because of the terrible things he does.

We're set to leave this Pharoah, this terrible Pharoah of ours.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

Leaving on a Desert Plane
(Sung to the tune of "Leaving on a Jet Plane")
© by Randi and Murray. Spiegel, Passover 2000

All our bags are packed we're ready to go
We're standing here outside our doors
We dare not wake you up to say goodbye

But the dawn is breakin' this early morn'
Moses is waiting, he's blowing his horn
We're planning our escape so we won't die

You'll miss me, as you will see
You've been dealt a harsh decree
You held us like you'd never let us go

We're leaving from this great strain
We pray we won't be back again
God knows, can't wait to go.

There's so many times you've let us down
Your many crimes have plagued our town
I tell you now they were all mean things

Every place I go, you'll shrink from view,
Every song I sing will be 'gainst you
I won't be back to wear your ball and chain

You'll miss me, as you will see
You've been dealt a harsh decree
You held us like you'd never let us go

We're leaving through a wet plain
We hope we won't be back again
God knows, can't wait to go.

Now the time has come for us to leave you
One more time, let me diss you
Close your eyes, we'll be on our way

Dream about the days to come
When you'll be left here all alone
About the time when I won't have to say

You'll miss me, as you will see
You've been dealt a harsh decree
You held us like you'd never let us go

We're leaving all our bread grain
We know we won't be back again
God knows, can't wait to go.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

Pharoah Got Run Over By the Red Sea
By Gary Teblum
(sung to the tune of “Grandma Got Run Over By A Reindeer”)


Pharoah got run over by the Red Sea.
Chasing Israelites who tried to leave.
Some might say there’s no such thing as Ha Shem
But as for Jewish people, we believe.

He'd been telling Moses daily
That he would not let them go. 
But the last plague was the last straw, 
So he sent them out the door, told them to go.

When he woke up the next mornin', 
Saw they left and did not pack. 
So he sent his men and horses, 
And instructing them to chase and get them back.

Pharoah got run over by the Red Sea.
Chasing Israelites who tried to leave.
Some might say there’s no such thing as Ha Shem
But as for Jewish people, we believe.

Up until they reached the Red Sea, 
They’d been takin' this so well. 
But they all then turned to Moses, 
Asking Moses what to do now, please do tell.

Moses raised his staff with wonders. 
All the water was pushed back. 
And the people traveled forward: 
With Egyptians right behind them on their track.

Pharoah got run over by the Red Sea.
Chasing Israelites who tried to leave.
Some might say there’s no such thing as Ha Shem
But as for Jewish people, we believe.

Once the Jews were through the Red Sea 
Moses lowered down his stick. 
And the waters all receded, 
Drowning each of Pharoah’s armies mighty quick. 

I've told relatives, friends and neighbors. 
What a miracle he did
Now you know we must remember, 
And retell this wondrous tale to every kid. 

Pharoah got run over by the Red Sea.
Chasing Israelites who tried to leave.
Some might say there’s no such thing as Ha Shem
But as for Jewish people, we believe.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

Through the Red Sea
(sung to the tune of “Under the Sea" )

Our people were running quickly
Not stopping to even bake.
They dreamed about a new homeland
Not simply for their own sake.

They saw what must lay before them
The red sea, they could not pass.
They all turned to look at Moses
He needed to move quite fast.

Through the red sea.
Through the red sea
Clearing a pathway
It was a great day
Take it from me.

Yes, a miracle this may be
You can tell from all the glee
Quickly they scampered
Couldn't be hampered
Through the red sea.

Egyptians followed behind them.
And into the path they go.
But no sooner were they in there
That God did close down the show.

Egyptians were not so lucky
They drowned on the water's floor
Such wonderful thing did happen
What more could we ask God for?

Under the sea
Under the sea
That's where Egyptians
Are having conniptions
Now we are free.

Yes, it's a miracle that this may be
You can tell from all the glee
We were all saved there
That's why you should care
‘Bout the red sea.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

What Makes Me Free


(Sung to the tune of “Til There Was You”)

(by Gary Teblum)

It’s what God, did for me
When he brought us out of Egypt
Yes, it’s just what God did for me
That makes me free.

It’s what God, did for you
When he brought us out of Egypt
Yes, it’s just what God did for you
That makes you free.

And there was freedom and wonderful mitzvahs
they tell me,
As we left from Miztrayim,
at dawn,
and so

It’s what God, did for me
When he brought us out of Egypt
Yes, it’s just what God did for me
That makes me free.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

Bye Bye Egypt


(to the tune of “Mickey Mouse Club”)

Now it’s time to celebrate
The end of slavery.
B-Y-E-B-Y-E E-G-Y-P-T

Hey! there, Hi! there, Ho! there
We’re as happy as can be.
B-Y-E-B-Y-E E-G-Y-P-T

Say goodbye!
Say goodbye!
Forever let us hold our banner High!
Chai! Chai! Chai!

Come along and sing a song
To show that we are free!
B-Y-E (Eat your matzah!)
B-Y-E (Elijah’s coming!)
E-G-Y-P-T

_________

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

In this Hurried Bold Act of Ours


(sung to the tune of In the Merry Old Land of Oz)

(by Gary Teblum)

Ha - ha - ha, Ho - ho - ho - And a couple of tra - la - las
That's how we leave and get away, in this hurried bold act of ours.

Break, break, break, Crunch, crunch, crunch – No leaven, just using flours
That's how the matzah makes our day, in this hurried bold act of ours.

Lamb’s blood here, Lamb’s blood there, so the angel of death will pass.
That's how we keep our young alive, in this hurried bold act of ours.

Red sea here, Red sea there, and a pathway shows his powers
That's how we know that G-d does care, in this hurried bold act of ours.

Timbrels here, trimbrels there, And Miriam sings for hours.
She knows what’s good and what is fair, in this hurried bold act of ours.

Ha - ha - ha, Ho - ho - ho - And a couple of tra - la - las
That's how we leave and get away, in this hurried bold act of ours.

Ha - ha - ha, Ho - ho - ho - And a couple of tra - la - las
That's how we leave and get away,
In this hurried bold act of ours.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

Now We are Free 
(tune of Neil Diamond's "Sweet Caroline")
 Barry Kling, copyright (c) 2011

When it began
For Pharoah we were workin'
But then Moses he came around

Was in the spring
Moses he went to Pharaoh
We always believed God come along

Plagues, ten of them
Smiting them
Freeing me
Freeing you

Now we are free
Bum, bum, bum
Freedom never seemed so good
So good, so good, so good
We were inclined
To believe we’d never leave

But now we ...
Know you're with us
And life don't seem so lonely
We fill it up with faith in you

And when we hurt
Hurtin' runs off our shoulders
How can we hurt when we’re with you

Plagues, ten of them
Smiting them
Freeing me
Freeing you

Now we are free
bum, bum, bum
Freedom never seemed so good
So good, so good, so good
We were inclined
To believe we’d never leave
Oh no, no

Now we are free
Bum, bum, bum
Freedom never felt so good
So good, so good, so good
We were inclined
To believe we’d never leave

Now we are free

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

He Freed Us
(Sung to the tune of “She Loves You”)
(by Gary Teblum)

He freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah
He freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah
He freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah

You think you’re not so free
Well, it was so yesterday-yi-yay
It’s just like you were there
And he told us what to say-yi-yay

You know he freed us,
and you know that can’t be bad
Oh yes, he freed us,
and you know we should be glad

God said you must act so
As if you were there too
And then God says you’ll know
How we maintain the glue

You know he freed us,
and you know that can’t be bad
Oh yes, he freed us,
and you know we should be glad

Oh, he freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah
He freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah
And with a God like that
You know we should be glad

You know he freed the Jews
He brought us from that land
As if you were there too
Grab on to his hand

You know he freed us,
and you know that can’t be bad
Oh yes, he freed us,
and you know we should be glad

Oo, he freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah
He freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah
And with a god like that
You know we should . . . be glad

Yeah, Yeah, Yeah Yeah, Yeah, Yeah, Yeahhhhh.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

Long ago, Adonai promised Abraham and Sarah that their
children would be a great people. It is this promise that has
given our ancestors courage and hope.

(Raise cup while saying:)

Vehi she'amdah la'aootenu o'lanu. Shelo echad bilvad amad aleinu
l'chalotenu. Ela sheb'chol dor vador omdim aleinu l'chalotenu. VeHakadosh
Baruch Hu maizilenu miyadam.

More than once in our history, enemies have tried to
destroy our people, but the Jewish people lives. 

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

The plagues and our subsequent redemption from Egypt are but one example of the care God has shown for us in our history. Had God but done any one of these kindnesses, it would have been enough – dayeinu.

אִלּוּ הוֹצִיאָֽנוּ מִמִּצְרַֽיִם, דַּיֵּנוּ

Ilu hotzi- hotzianu, Hotzianu mi-mitzrayim Hotzianu mi-mitzrayim, Dayeinu

If God had only taken us out of Egypt, that would have been enough!

אִלּוּ נָתַן לָֽנוּ אֶת־הַתּוֹרָה, דַּיֵּנוּ

Ilu natan natan lanu, natan lanu et ha-Torah, Natan lanu et ha-Torah , Dayeinu

If God had only given us the Torah, that would have been enough.

 The complete lyrics to Dayeinu tell the entire story of the Exodus from Egypt as a series of miracles God performed for us. (See the Additional Readings if you want to read or sing them all.)

Dayeinu also reminds us that each of our lives is the cumulative result of many blessings, small and large. 

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

Ilu hotzi hotzianu hotzianu mi’mitzrayim Hotzianu mi’mitzrayim dayenu (If you had only brought us out of Mitzrayim – Dayenu!) Dai-dai-yenu, Dai-dai-yenu, Dai-dai-yenu Dai-yenu, Dai-yenu!

Ilu natan natan lanu natan lanu et ha'shabbat Natan lanu et ha'shabbat dayenu (If you had only given us Shabbat – Dayenu!) Dai-dai-yenu, Dai-dai-yenu, Dai-dai-yenu Dai-yenu, Dai-yenu!

Ilu natan natan lanu natan lanu et ha'torah Natan lanu et ha'torah dayenu (If you had only given us the Torah – Dayenu!) Dai-dai-yenu, Dai-dai-yenu, Dai-dai-yenu Dai-yenu, Dai-yenu!

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

We have now told the story of Passover…but wait! We’re not quite done. There are still some symbols on our seder plate we haven’t talked about yet. Rabban Gamliel would say that whoever didn’t explain the shank bone, matzah, and marror (or bitter herbs) hasn’t done Passover justice.

The shank bone represents the Pesach, the special lamb sacrifice made in the days of the Temple for the Passover holiday. It is called the pesach, from the Hebrew word meaning “to pass over,” because God passed over the houses of our ancestors in Egypt when visiting plagues upon our oppressors.

The matzah reminds us that when our ancestors were finally free to leave Egypt, there was no time to pack or prepare. Our ancestors grabbed whatever dough was made and set out on their journey, letting their dough bake into matzah as they fled.

The bitter herbs provide a visceral reminder of the bitterness of slavery, the life of hard labor our ancestors experienced in Egypt.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

Let us now raise the second cup of wine and pray together:

Dear God, we thank you for this beautiful festival of Pesach. It reminds us of your great gift of freedom to our ancestors and to us. As you have enabled us to reach this day, so may you help us to observe other holy days and festivals in the years ahead, in joy and in peace. We thank you too that this Pesach is celebrated in a free and independent state of Israel and rebuilt Jerusalem.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the second glass of wine!

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Rachtzah
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

As we now transition from the formal telling of the Passover story to the celebratory meal, we once again wash our hands to prepare ourselves. In Judaism, a good meal together with friends and family is itself a sacred act, so we prepare for it just as we prepared for our holiday ritual, recalling the way ancient priests once prepared for service in the Temple.

Some people distinguish between washing to prepare for prayer and washing to prepare for food by changing the way they pour water on their hands. For washing before food, pour water three times on your right hand and then three times on your left hand.

After you have poured the water over your hands, recite this short blessing.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו, וְצִוָּנוּ  עַל נְטִילַת יָדָֽיִם

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al n’tilat yadayim.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to wash our hands.

Motzi-Matzah
Source : JewishBoston.com

The blessing over the meal and matzah | motzi matzah | מוֹצִיא מַצָּה

The familiar hamotzi blessing marks the formal start of the meal. Because we are using matzah instead of bread, we add a blessing celebrating this mitzvah.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, הַמּוֹצִיא לֶֽחֶם מִן הָאָֽרֶץ

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, hamotzi lechem min ha-aretz.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who brings bread from the land.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתַָיו וְצִוָּֽנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מַצָּה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat matzah.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to eat matzah.

Distribute and eat the top and middle matzah for everyone to eat.

Motzi-Matzah

Eight Days? A Week?
(to the tune of “Eight Days a Week”)
(Just how long is Passover, anyway?)

Ooh, I need my bread, babe
Guess you know it’s true.
How long must I wait, babe?
What’s your point of view?

Bagels, challah! Bagels, challah!
I ain’t got nothing but matzah
Eight days? A week?

Some Jews say it’s seven.
Others say it’s eight.
Just how long is Pesach?
 How long must I wait?

Bagels, challah! Bagels, challah!
I ain’t got nothing but matzah
Eight days? A week?

Eight days? A week?
Of Peeeeeeeeeeeeesach.
Eight days? A week?
It’s long enough to show we care.

Ooh, I need my bread, babe
Guess you know it’s true.
How long must I wait, babe?
What’s your point of view?

Bagels, challah! Bagels, challah!
I ain’t got nothing but matzah
Eight days? A week?

(c)  2012 Barbara Sarshik and Leah Pike

Maror
Source : JewishBoston.com

Dipping the bitter herb in sweet charoset | maror  |מָרוֹר   

  In creating a holiday about the joy of freedom, we turn the story of our bitter history into a sweet celebration. We recognize this by dipping our bitter herbs into the sweet charoset. We don’t totally eradicate the taste of the bitter with the taste of the sweet… but doesn’t the sweet mean more when it’s layered over the bitterness?

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָּֽנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מרוֹר

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat maror.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to eat bitter herbs.

Maror

Have Yourself a Piece of Bitter Maror
By Gary Teblum
(sung to the tune of "Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas”)


Have yourself a piece of bitter maror
On each seder night
Then we’ll feel
The toils and our people's plight.

Have yourself a piece of bitter maror
Hillel sandwich way,
We'll recall,
Our troubles weren’t so far away.

Here we are as in a olden days,
Such sad slavin' days of yore.

Family, friends who are dear to us
gather near to us once more.

Through the years we all will be together
Just as we are now
Eating matzah, teaching all the children how.
And have yourself a piece of bitter maror now.

Maror

Just a Tad of Charoset
(to the tune of "Just a Spoon Full of Sugar")

Chorus:

Just a tad of charoset helps the bitter herbs go down,
The bitter herbs go down, the bitter herbs go down.
Just a tad of charoset helps the bitter herbs go down,
In the most disguising way.

Oh, back in Egypt long ago,
The Jews were slaves under Pharaoh.
They sweat and toiled and labored through the day.
So when we gather Pesach night,
We do what we think right.
Maror, we chew,
To feel what they went through.

Chorus

So after years of slavery
They saw no chance of being free.
Their suffering was the only life they knew.
But baby Moses grew up tall,
And said he'd save them all.
He did, and yet,
We swear we won't forget.
That......

Chorus

While the maror is being passed,
We all refill our water glass,
Preparing for the taste that turns us red.
Although maror seems full of minuses,
It sure does clear our sinuses.
But what's to do?
It's hard to be a Jew!!!

Chorus

Maror

A Spoon of Charoses
(to the tune of “A Spoonful of Sugar” from Mary Poppins)

At every seder every year,
There is an element of fear
When I must eat a bitter herb.
And in the moment that I dread,
The heat goes to my head,
I cough! I sneeze!
I whimper and I wheeze! But…

(Chorus)

A spoon of charoses helps
the bitter herb go down,
The bitter herb go down,
bitter herb go down,

Yes, a spoon of charoses
helps the bitter herb go down
In the most delightful way.

So you should keep it in your mind,
If there’s a moment when you find
There’s something dreadful you are asked to do.

It'll be better if you add
A thing that’s not so bad,
A song! A sweet!
A favorite toy or treat! Cause…

(Repeat chorus)

©2008 Barbara Sarshik

Maror

If I Only Had Some Chrain (tune of "If I Only Had A Brain")
by Martin Eiger, Passover 2009

We are sitting at the Seder,
More food is coming later,
But now I am in pain.
It would help my digestion,
I could get through all four questions
If I only had some chrain.

The hosts would speed it up if they knew,
We'd get through the Dayenu
And not do each refrain.
It would ease my neurosis,
I'd enjoy all this harosis
If I only had some chrain.

Oh I would tell the tale,
I'd recount the plagues and parting of the sea.
How glorious and wondrous it would be.
We'd drink some wine
And then we'd dine.

But now my stomach is off-kilter.
The fish is too gefilte.
The parsley sprigs seem plain.
I'd be happy eating lotsa
Food. I'd chow down all the matza
If I only had some chrain.

Koreich
Source : JewishBoston.com

Eating a sandwich of matzah and bitter herb | koreich | כּוֹרֵךְ

When the Temple stood in Jerusalem, the biggest ritual of them all was eating the lamb offered as the pesach or Passover sacrifice. The great sage Hillel would put the meat in a sandwich made of matzah, along with some of the bitter herbs. While we do not make sacrifices any more – and, in fact, some Jews have a custom of purposely avoiding lamb during the seder so that it is not mistaken as a sacrifice – we honor this custom by eating a sandwich of the remaining matzah and bitter herbs. Some people will also include charoset in the sandwich to remind us that God’s kindness helped relieve the bitterness of slavery.

Shulchan Oreich

Matzah Ball Soup
By Gary Teblum
(sung to the tune of “Jingle Bell Rock”)

 
Matzah ball, matzah ball, matzah ball soup
Matzah ball’s king in soup that we bring
Blowing and blowing on soup when it’s done
Soon we’ll know why there’s only one.
 
Matzah ball, matzah ball, matzah ball soup
See if we rhyme when’it’s matzah ball time
Floating and bloating from Matzah Ball pair
If you’re apt to dare.
 
What a bright time, it's the right time
To eat the soup this way
Matzah ball time is a swell time
To go sliding down your throat and say

Giddy-up matzah balls, fill up the bowls
For the entire group
Eating this consommé’s good for the souls
That's the matzah ball,
That's the matzah ball,
That's the matzah ball soup.

Shulchan Oreich

Brisket Melody (Sung to the tune of "Windy")

What do we serve on every occasion?
What will eat this Passover night?
What kind of beef just spells "celebration"?
Everyone knows its brisket.

Chorus:

And Brisket is quick to make,
just wrap it in foil and bake
Make extra for goodness sake.
It freezes well, it freezes well.

What makes a vegetarian think twice?
What cut of beef do cows want to be?
What really was that manna from Heaven?
Everyone knows it's Brisket.

Shulchan Oreich
Source : JewishBoston.com

Eating the meal! | shulchan oreich | שֻׁלְחָן עוֹרֵךְ

Enjoy! But don’t forget when you’re done we’ve got a little more seder to go, including the final two cups of wine!

Tzafun
Source : JewishBoston.com

Finding and eating the Afikomen | tzafoon | צָפוּן

The playfulness of finding the afikomen reminds us that we balance our solemn memories of slavery with a joyous celebration of freedom. As we eat the afikomen, our last taste of matzah for the evening, we are grateful for moments of silliness and happiness in our lives.

Tzafun

Don't Sit on the Afikomen
(Sung to the tune of "Glory, Glory, Halleluyah")

My Dad at every Seder breaks a Matza piece in two
And hides the Afikomen half-A game for me and you
Find it, hold it ransom for the Seder isn't through
'till the Afikomen's gone.

Chorus:
on't sit on the Afikomen.
Don't sit on the Afikomen.
Don't sit on the Afikomen.
Or the Meal will last all night.

 One year Daddy hid it 'neath a pillow on a chair
But just as I raced over, my Aunt Sophie sat down there
She threw herself upon it-
Awful crunching filled the air
And crumbs flew all around

Chorus

There were matza crumbs all over-
Oh, it was a messy sight
We swept up all the pieces though it took us half the night
So, if you want your seder ending sooner than dawn's light,
Don't sit on the Afiko-o-men

Chorus

Tzafun

Afikomen
(Sung to the tune of “Mamma Mia”)
By Gary Teblum

I’ve been looking for you, all over the den
It’s the thing I must find, yet it’s almost ten
Look under there, you hid it so well?
I don’t know where, but I certainly know the goal
I can feel that I’m on a roll

One more look and I can find the whole thing
One more look and it’s the matzah I’ll bring, o-o-o-oh

Afikomen, let me look again
Oy oy, how is it I’ve missed ya?
Afikomen, found by Josh again
Oy oy, once again I’ve missed ya

Yes, it was broken dad said
Searching's what I dread
Why, why though I’m looking high and low?
Afikomen, now I’m just too slow,
Oy oy, thus I never get the dough.

I’ve been angry and sad ‘bout the lack of a clue
I can’t count all the times to the search I’ve been true
And when I’m slow, while it’s wine you pour
I think you know, that wherever I look is wrong
You know it’s that same old song.

Just one look but I can’t find the darn thing
One more look and to these hopes I do cling, o-o-o-oh

Afikomen, let me look again
Oy oy, how is it I’ve missed you?
Afikomen, found by Josh again
Oy oy, once again I’ve missed you

Yes, it was broken dad said
Searching’s what I dread
Why, why though I’m looking high and low?
Afikomen, now I’m just too slow,
Oy oy, thus I never get the dough.

Tzafun

AFIKOMEN
(sung to “Daisy”)

A-fi-ko-men, give me your answer do.
I’m half crazy over the search for you.
It comes from an ancient custom
An old and honored custom
To give a treat,
To the child so sweet,
Who can find afikomen true.

Prizes, money, even sometimes a toy,
Are the re-wards for the keen girl or boy.
It comes from an ancient custom,
An old and honored custom.
The champ we’ll pay
After dinner today
As we share in the Pesah joy!

Bareich

Barech

בָּרֵךְ

Pour the third cup of wine and recite Birkat Hamazon (Blessing after the Meal).

Leader:

רַבּוֹתַי נְבָרֵךְ.

Rabotai n’vareich.

Friends, let us say grace.

Participants:

יְהִי שֵׁם יְיָ מְבֹרָךְ מֵעַתָּה וְעַד עוֹלָם.

Y’hee sheim Adonai m’vo-rach mei-atah v’ad olam.

Praised be the name of the Lord now and forever.

Leader:

יְהִי שֵׁם יְיָ מְבֹרָךְ מֵעַתָּה וְעַד עוֹלָם. בִּרְשׁוּת מָרָנָן וְרַבָּנָן וְרַבּוֹתַי נְבָרֵך (אֱלֹהֵינוּ) שֶׁאָכַלְנוּ מִשֶּׁלוֹ.

Y’hee sheim Adonai m’vorach mei-atah v’ad olam. Beer-shut maranan v’rabanan v’rabotai, n’vareich (Eloheinu) she’achalnu mee-shelo.

Praised be the name of the Lord now and forever. With your permission, let us now bless (our God) whose food we have eaten.

Participants:

בָּרוּךְ (אֱלֹהֵינוּ) שֶׁאָכַלְנוּ מִשֶּׁלוֹ וּבְטוּבוֹ חָיִּינוּ.

Baruch (Eloheinu) she’achalnu mishelo uv’tuvo chayinu.

Blessed be (our God) whose food we have eaten.

Leader:

בָּרוּךְ (אֱלֹהֵינוּ) שֶׁאָכַלְנוּ מִשֶּׁלוֹ וּבְטוּבוֹ חָיִּינוּ.

Baruch (Eloheinu) she’achalnu mishelo uv’tuvo chayinu.

Blessed be (our God) whose food we have eaten.

All together:

בָּרוּךְ הוּא וּבָרוּך שְׁמוֹ.

Baruch hu u-varuch sh’mo.

Blessed be He and blessed be His name.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, הַזָּן אֶת הָעוֹלָם כֻּלּוֹ בְּטוּבוֹ בְּחֵן בְּחֶסֶד וּבְרַחֲמִים הוּא נוֹתֵן לֶחֶם לְכָל בָּשָׂר, כִּי לְעוֹלָם חַסְדּוֹ. וּבְטוּבוֹ הַגָּדוֹל תָּמִיד לֹא חָסַר לָנוּ וְאַל יֶחְסַר לָנוּ מָזוֹן לְעוֹלָם וָעֶד. בַּעֲבוּר שְׁמוֹ הַגָּדוֹל כִּי הוּא אֵל זָן וּמְפַרְנֵס לַכֹּל וּמֵטִיב לַכֹּל וּמֵכִין מָזוֹן לְכָל בְּרִיּוֹתָיו אֲשֶׁר בָּרָא. בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, הַזָּן אֶת הַכֹּל.

Baruch atah Adonai, Eloheinu melech ha-olam, hazan et ha-olam kulo b’tuvo, b’chein b’chesed uv-rachamim, hu noten lechem l’chol basar, ki l’olam chasdo, uv-tuvo hagadol, tamid lo chasar lanu v’al yechsar lanu mazon l’olam va’ed. Ba-avur sh’mo hagadol, ki hu Eil zan um’farneis lakol, u-meitiv lakol u-meichin mazon l’chol-b’riyotav asher bara. Baruch atah Adonai, hazan et hakol.

Praised are you, Adonai, Lord our God, Ruler of the universe, who nourishes the whole world. Your kindness endures forever. May we never be in want of sustenance. God sustains us all, doing good to all, and providing food for all creation. Praised are you, Adonai, who sustains all.

נוֹדֶה לְךָ יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינוּ עַל שֶׁהִנְחַלְתָּ לַאֲבוֹתֵינוּ אֶרֶץ חֶמְדָּה טוֹבָה וּרְחָבָה, וְעַל שֶׁהוֹצֵאתָנוּ יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֵאֶרֶץ מִצְרַיִם וּפְדִיתָנוּ מִבֵּית עֲבָדִים, וְעַל בְּרִיתְךָ שֶׁחָתַמְתָּ בִּבְשָׂרֵנוּ, וְעַל תּוֹרָתְךָ שֶׁלִמַּדְתָּנוּ, וְעַל חֻקֶּיךָ שֶׁהוֹדַעְתָּנוּ, וְעַל חַיִּים חֵן וָחֶסֶד שֶׁחוֹנַנְתָּנוּ, וְעַל אֲכִילַת מָזוֹן שָׁאַתָּה זָן וּמְפַרְנֵס אוֹתָנוּ תָּמִיד בְּכָל יוֹם וּבְכָל עֵת וּבְכָל שָׁעָה.

We thank you, Adonai, Lord our God, for having given a beautiful, good, and spacious land; for having taken us out from the land of Egypt and redeemed us from the house of slavery; for Your covenant which You sealed in our flesh; for Your Torah which You taught us; for the life, grace and kindness You have granted us; and for the food with which You always sustain us.

וְעַל הַכֹּל יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינוּ אֲנַחְנוּ מוֹדִים לָךְ וּמְבָרְכִים אוֹתָךְ יִתְבָּרַךְ שִׁמְךָ בְּפִי כָל חַי תָּמִיד לְעוֹלָם וָעֶד. כַּכָּתוּב, וְאָכַלְתָּ וְשָׂבָעְתָּ וּבֵרַכְתָּ אֶת יְיָ אֱלֹהֶיךָ עַל הָאָרֶץ הַטֹּבָה אֲשֶׁר נָתַן לָךְ. בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, עַל הָאָרֶץ וְעַל הַמָּזוֹן.

רַחֶם נָא יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינוּ עַל יִשְׂרָאֵל עַמֶּךָ וְעַל יְרוּשָׁלַיִם עִירֶךָ וְעַל צִיּוֹן מִשְׁכַּן כְּבוֹדֶךָ וְעַל מַלְכוּת בֵּית דָּוִד מְשִׁיחֶךָ וְעַל הַבַּיִת הַגָּדוֹל וְהַקָּדוֹשׁ שֶׁנִּקְרָא שִׁמְךָ עָלָיו. אֱלֹהֵינוּ אָבִינוּ רְעֵנוּ זוּנֵנוּ פַּרְנְסֵנוּ וְכַלְכְּלֵנוּ וְהַרְוִיחֵנוּ וְהַרְוַח לָנוּ יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינוּ מְהֵרָה מִכָּל צָרוֹתֵינוּ. וְנָא אַל תַּצְרִיכֵנוּ יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינוּ לֹא לִידֵי מַתְּנַת בָּשָׂר וָדָם וְלֹא לִידֵי הַלְוָאָתָם, כִּי אִם לְיָדְךָ הַמְּלֵאָה הַפְּתוּחָה הַקְּדוֹשָׁה וְהָרְחָבָה, שֶׁלּא נֵבוֹשׁ וְלֹא נִכָּלֵם לְעוֹלָם וָעֶד.

V’al hakol Adonai Eloheinu anachnu modim lach um’varchim otach, yitbarach shimcha b’fi kol chai tamid l’olam va’ed. Kakatuv, v’achalta v’savata uveirachta et Adonai Elohecha al ha’aretz hatova asher natan lach. Baruch atah Adonai al ha-aretz v’al hamazon.

Racheim na Adonai Eloheinu al Yisrael amecha v’al Y’rushalayim irecha v’al Tzion mishkan k’vodecha v’al malchut beit David m’shichecha v’al habayit hagadol v’hakadosh shenikra shimcha alav. Eloheinu Avinu r’einu zuneinu parn’seinu v’chalk’lenu v’harvicheinu v’harvach’lanu Adonai Eloheinu m’heira mikol-tzaroteinu. V’na al tatz’richeinu Adonai Eloheinu, lo lidei matnat basar vadam v’lo lidei hal’va’atam, ki im l’yad’cha ham’lei’a hap’tucha hak’dosha v’har’chava, shelo neivosh v’lo nikaleim l’olam va’ed.

For everything, Adonai, our God, we thank and praise You. May your name be blessed by all forever, as it is written: “After you have eaten and are satisfied, you shall bless Adonai, our God for the good land he has given you.” Praised are you, Adonai, for the land and the food.

The Blessing after the Meal concludes by drinking the Third Cup of wine, while reclining to the left.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָפֶן.

Baruch atah Adonai, Eloheinu melech ha-olam, borei p'ri hagafen.

Praised are you, Adonai, Lord of the universe, who has created the fruit of the vine.

Elijah

The Cup of Elijah

We now refill our wine glasses one last time and open the front door to invite the prophet Elijah to join our seder.

In the Bible, Elijah was a fierce defender of God to a disbelieving people. At the end of his life, rather than dying, he was whisked away to heaven. Tradition holds that he will return in advance of messianic days to herald a new era of peace, so we set a place for Elijah at many joyous, hopeful Jewish occasions, such as a baby’s bris and the Passover seder.

Traditionally the youngest children open the door for Elijah. Everyone joins in singing "Eliyahu Ha-Navi" and then the door is closed.

Eliyahu Ha-navee

Eliyahu Ha-tish-bee

Eliyahu, Eliyahu

Eliyahu Ha-giladee

Bim Heira B’yameinu Yavo eileinu


Eem mashiah ben David

Eem mashiah ben David

Hallel
Source : JewishBoston.com

The Cup of Elijah

We now refill our wine glasses one last time and open the front door to invite the prophet Elijah to join our seder.

In the Bible, Elijah was a fierce defender of God to a disbelieving people. At the end of his life, rather than dying, he was whisked away to heaven. Tradition holds that he will return in advance of messianic days to herald a new era of peace, so we set a place for Elijah at many joyous, hopeful Jewish occasions, such as a baby’s bris and the Passover seder.

אֵלִיָּֽהוּ הַנָּבִיא, אֵלִיָּֽהוּ הַתִּשְׁבִּיאֵלִיָּֽהוּ, אֵלִיָּֽהוּ,אֵלִיָּֽהוּ הַגִּלְעָדִי

בִּמְהֵרָה בְיָמֵֽנוּ יָבוֹא אֵלֵֽינוּ

עִם מָשִֽׁיחַ בֶּן דָּוִד

עִם מָשִֽׁיחַ בֶּן דָּוִד

Eliyahu hanavi
Eliyahu hatishbi
Eliyahu, Eliyahu, Eliyahu hagiladi
Bimheirah b’yameinu, yavo eileinu
Im mashiach ben-David,
Im mashiach ben-David

Elijah the prophet, the returning, the man of Gilad:
return to us speedily,
in our days with the messiah,
son of David.

Hallel

Ode to Elijah
(sung to the tune of “Be Our Guest”)

Be our guest! Be our guest!
Put our seder to the test!
All you have to do is come on in
And we’ll provide the rest.

Here’s some wine in a cup!
Just recline and drink it up!
It will be your favorite flavor
If it’s Concord grape you favor!

Life is sweet! Life is good!
When you’re in our neighborhood!
And when you're here,
Elijah, we are blessed!

Just park your golden chariot.
You don’t need a Marriott!
Be our guest! Be our guest! Be our guest!

©2008 Barbara Sarshik

Hallel

Elijah’s Song
By Gary Teblum
(sung to the tune of “The Little Drummer Boy”)

Watch they told me
pa rum pum pum pum
Elijah’s here you see,
pa rum pum pum pum
It’s peace and joy he’ll bring
pa rum pum pum pum
Fill up his cup and sing
pa rum pum pum pum
rum pum pum pum
rum pum pum pum
Open up the door for him
pa rum pum pum pum,
when he comes.

Hallel

Oh When Elijah Comes to Our Door
SIng to the tune of Oh When the Saints Go Marching In·

OH when Elijah. comes to our door,
Oh when Elijah comes to our door
We will·open it up for him
On when Elijah comes to our door.

We'll pour some wine, in Elijah's cup
We'll pour some wine; in Elijah's cup
We'll all say l'chaim with him
As he drinks wine from this cup.

He'll bring us peace, and freedom too
He'lI bring us peace and freedom too
So let's rejoice that he can join
Eliyahu hanavi.

Hallel

Elijah
(Sung to the tune of "Maria")


Elijah!
I just saw the prophet Elijah.
And suddenly that name
Will never sound the same to me.
Elijah!
He came to our seder

Elijah!
He had his cup of wine,
But could not stay to dine
This year--

Elijah!
For your message all Jews are waiting:
That the time's come for peace
and not hating--

Elijah--
Next year we'll be waiting.
Elijah!

Songs
Source : JewishBoston.com
Who knows one?

At some seders, people go around the table reading a question and the answers in one breath. Thirteen is hard!

Who knows one?

I know one.

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows two?

I know two.

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows two?

I know two.

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows four?

I know four.

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows five?

I know five.

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows six?

I know six.

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows seven?

I know seven.

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows eight?

I know eight.

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows nine?

I know nine.

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows ten?

I know ten.

Ten are the Words from Sinai

Nine are the months of childbirth

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows eleven?

I know eleven.

Eleven are the stars

Ten are the Words from Sinai

Nine are the months of childbirth

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows twelve?

I know twelve.

Twelve are the tribes

Eleven are the stars

Ten are the Words from Sinai

Nine are the months of childbirth

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows thirteen?

I know thirteen

Thirteen are the attributes of God

Twelve are the tribes

Eleven are the stars

Ten are the Words from Sinai

Nine are the months of childbirth

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Songs
Source : JewishBoston.com

Chad Gadya

חַד גַּדְיָא, חַד גַּדְיָא

דְזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי

חַד גַּדְיָא, חַד גַּדְיָא

Chad gadya, chad gadya

Dizabin abah bitrei zuzei

Chad gadya, chad gadya.

One little goat, one little goat:

Which my father brought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The cat came and ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The dog came and bit the cat

That ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The stick came and beat the dog

That bit the cat that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The fire came and burned the stick

That beat the dog that bit the cat

That ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The water came and extinguished the

Fire that burned the stick

That beat the dog that bit the cat

That ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The ox came and drank the water

That extinguished the fire

That burned the stick that beat the dog That bit the cat that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The butcher came and killed the ox,

That drank the water

That extinguished the fire

That burned the stick that beat the dog That bit the cat that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The angle of death came and slew

The butcher who killed the ox,

That drank the water

That extinguished the fire

That burned the stick that beat the dog That bit the cat that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The Holy One, Blessed Be He came and

Smote the angle of death who slew

The butcher who killed the ox,

That drank the water

That extinguished the fire

That burned the stick that beat the dog That bit the cat that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.