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Introduction
Lighting the Candles

The seder officially begins with a physical act: lighting the candles. Before the start of every Sabbath or Jewish holiday, it is traditional for the women of the household (or any individual) to light two candles in honor of the holiness of the day. As we light the festival candles, we acknowledge that as they brighten our Passover table, good thoughts, good words, and good deeds brighten our days. In Jewish tradition, lighting candles and saying a blessing over them marks a time of transition, from the day that is ending to the one that is beginning, from ordinary time to sacred time. Lighting the candles is an important part of our Passover celebration because their flickering light reminds us of the importance of keeping the fragile flame of freedom alive in the world.

Introduction
Shehechyanu

Baruch atah, Adonai Eloheinu, Melech haolam, shehecheyanu v’kiy’manu v’higianu laz’man hazeh.

Praise to You, Adonai our God, Sovereign of the universe, for giving us life, for sustaining us, and for enabling us to reach this season.

- See more at: http://www.reformjudaism.org/practice/prayers-blessings/passover-evening-blessings-kiddush-blessing-over-wine-shabbat-version#sthash.qpyYHOKu.dpuf

Introduction
Kadesh
Source : Deborah Putnoi Art
First Cup of Wine

Kadesh

Jewish celebrations usually include wine as a symbol of joy.

Wine sanctifies an occasion and makes it holy.

During the Passover Seder we drink four cups of wine, why four?

In the Book of Exodus, God convinced the Jews to leave Egypt using four statements:

I shall take you out
I shall rescue you
I shall redeem you
I shall bring you

We toast each of these statements with a cup of wine.

Pour and raise your first cup of wine/grape juice. This cup is dedicated to the renewal of spring, to the renewal of ourselves.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink your first cup of wine/grape juice!

Kadesh
Source : Original

Now, we're going to take the wine/juice that we've poured and each add to Elijah's cup.

Now let's do the same from our water glasses to fill Miriam's cup.

Combining our actions together is what will help Elijah come to ourworld.

 We set an extra place for Elijah and we'll open the door and invite him in later. Miriam was Moses's sister and we honor her for how she helped Moses wich made our story possible today.

Urchatz
Source : http://www.ritualwell.org/ritual/urchatz-%E2%80%94-dip-hands

The beginning of the seder seems strange. We start with kiddush as we normally would when we begin any festive meal. Then we wash, but without a blessing, and break bread without eating it.

What’s going on here?

It seems that the beginning of the seder is kind of a false start. We act as if we are going to begin the meal but then we realize that we can’t – we can’t really eat this meal until we understand it, until we tell the story of the exodus from Egypt. So we interrupt our meal preparations with maggid (telling the story). Only once we have told the story do we make kiddush again, wash our hands again (this time with a blessing) and break bread and eat it! In order to savor this meal, in order to appreciate the sweet taste of Passover, we must first understand it.

Karpas
Source : Original

Why do we dip our food in salt water two times on this night? The first time, the salty taste reminds us of the tears we cried when we were slaves.

As we start the Seder this year, there may be things we are sad about. Dipping the parsley in salt water can help us see those tears and release them because we are doing something with our feelings. As we dip, let's say out loud, is there anything you are sad about that you want to name and translate with the salt water?

...

Great - so we had tears as slaves, and tears now, and we remember them. But we've still only answered half the question! The second time we dip, the salt water and the green can help us to remember the ocean and green plants and the Earth, from which we get the water and air and food that enable us to live.

As we move further into the Seder and dip our parsley for the second time, what do the water and greens help you remember that gives us sustenance and hope?

...

Karpas
Source : Haggadot.com
Karpas Coloring Page

Yachatz

There are three pieces of matzah stacked on the table. We now break the middle matzah into two pieces. We'll wrap up the larger of the pieces and hide it before the end of dinner. This piece is called the afikomen, literally “dessert” in Greek. After dinner, the children will get to find for the afikomen!

We eat matzah in memory of the quick flight of our ancestors from Egypt. As slaves, they had faced many false starts before finally being let go. So when the word of their freedom came, they took whatever dough they had and ran with it before it had the chance to rise, leaving it looking something like matzah.

Uncover and hold up the three pieces of matzah and everyone say together:

All Together: “This is the bread of affliction which our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt. Let all who are hungry come and eat; let all who are needy come and celebrate the Passover with us. Now we are here; next year may we be in the Land of Israel. Now we are slaves; next year may we be free.”

Maggid - Beginning

ּעֲבָדִים הָיִינוּ הָיִינו. עַתָּה בְּנֵי חוֹרִין

Avadim hayinu hayinu. Ata b’nei chorin.

We were slaves to Pharaoh in Egypt. Now we are free.

We were slaves to Pharaoh in Egypt, and God took us from there with a strong hand and outstretched arm. Had God not brought our ancestors out of Egypt, then even today we and our children and our grandchildren would still be slaves. Even if we were all wise, knowledgeable scholars and Torah experts, we would still be obligated to tell the story of the exodus from Egypt.

Maggid - Beginning
Source : Unknown

A Passover Song [Sung to the tune of "My favorite things"]

Cleaning and cooking and so many dishes, Out with the hametz, no pasta, no knishes

These are a few of our Passover things.

When the plagues strike, When the lice bite, When we're feeling sad

We simply remember our Passover things And then we don't feel so bad.

Matzoh and karpas and chopped up haroset, Shankbones and Kiddish and Yiddish neuroses, Tante who kvetches and uncle who sings, These are a few of our Passover things.

When the plagues strike, When the lice bite, When we're feeling sad

We simply remember our Passover things And then we don't feel so bad.

Motzi and maror and trouble with Pharoahs, Famines and locusts and slaves with wheelbarrows, Matzoh balls floating and eggshell that cling, These are a few of our Passover things.

When the plagues strike, When the lice bite, When we're feeling sad

We simply remember our Passover things And then we don't feel so bad.

-- Four Questions
Source : Traditional

                 Maggid – Four Questions

מַהנִּשְּׁתַּנָה

?מַה נִּשְּׁתַּנָה הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה מִכָּל הַלֵּילוֹת

Mah nish-ta-na ha-lai-lah ha-zeh mikol ha-lei-lot?

Why is this night of Passover different from all other nights of the year?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָנוּ אוֹכְלִין חָמֵץ וּמַצָּה, הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה - כּוּלוֹ מַצָּה

She-b'chol ha-lei-lot anu och'lin cha-meitz u-matzah. Ha-laylah hazeh kulo matzah.

On all other nights, we eat either leavened or unleavened bread, why on this night do we eat only matzah?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָנוּ אוֹכְלִין שְׁאָר יְרָקוֹת, - הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה מָרוֹר

Sheb'chol ha-lei-lot anu och'lin sh'ar y'rakot. Ha-lai-lah h-azeh maror.

On all other nights, we eat vegetables of all kinds, why on this night must we eat bitter herbs?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אֵין אֶנוּ מַטְבִּילִין אֲפִילוּ פַּעַם אֶחָת, - הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה שְׁתֵּי פְעָמִים

Sheb'chol ha-lei-lot ein anu mat-beelin afee-lu pa-am echat.Ha-lai-lah hazeh sh'tei p'ameem.

On all other nights, we do not dip vegetables even once,
why on this night do we dip greens into salt water and bitter herbs into sweet haroset?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָנוּ אוֹכְלִין בֵּין יוֹשְׁבִין וּבֵין מְסֻבִּין, - הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה כֻּלָנו מְסֻ

Sheb’khol ha-lei-lot anu och-leem bein yo-shveen u-vein m’su-been, ha-lailah hazeh kulanu m’subeen.

On all other nights, everyone sits up straight at the table, why on this night do we recline and eat at leisure?

-- Four Questions
Source : Original

This is an unusual year in which to be celebrating Passover. I thought we should add an additional question (okay, two questions) to acknowledge this.

On all other nights we may gather with friends and family around our table. Why this year do we not?

On all other nights we may increase joy by sharing holidays with our community. What does it mean for us that this year we cannot?

The answers to the first four traditional questions we will answer during the rest of the Seder, but let's answer these questions here. This year we do not gather with friends and family because we are safer at home, and because Judaism puts regard for life above all us. Staying safer in each of our homes is how we put that into action, how we keep ourselves and others in our community safe.

Though this Seder is not the one we originally planned, having Passover with just the four of us does not make this year's Seder any "less." In preparing for our Plan B Seder at home, I thought about my Great Auntie Pearl, one of Great-Grandma's sisters who I remember. She grew up during the Great Depression in the 1930s. Many people who lived through that time developed frugal habits out of necessity - they simply had to to live. Even decades later though, Auntie Pearl was very careful to not waste any amount of food, and she treated milk like it was gold; it had a lasting impact.

I assume it was challenging in those years for their family to even put a good meal on the table for Pesach. We are blessed to still be able to have plentiful meat for our Seder and all the other days. Yet this time may be hard for us in its own ways because humans are social creatures, and our ability to be social with each other has changed sharply.

I think though, of Auntie Pearl and our other family members who came before us, and of how they also would have held Seders in these hard years as best they could and with as much joy as they could. It brings me comfort to know that we aren't the only ones to ever have a Seder in challenging times, and also to know that it won't always be like this! After the Great Depression, our now-older relatives also got to celebrate in times of plenty again, as will we.

I hope that this reflection will help us celebrate the holiday this year feeling connected to generations of Jews and drawing strength from them.

-- Four Children
Source : Original
The Four Children

The Haggadah tells us about four types of children. We can imagine these are actual children, or that they are the inner children in us. Their questions are above.

How might we answer each child's questions?

How do you imagine the faces of each type of child to look? Make an appropriate face for each one.

-- Exodus Story
Source : Original

We are told that every person should see him/herself as having personally left Egypt. How can we fulfill this obligation of radical empathy?

The Hebrew word for Egypt, Mitzrayim, literally translates to "a narrow place." It implies this image of a restrained or confined space. We might not have personal memories of enslavement in Egypt, but we all have experiences with feeling restrained or confined. That is especially true this year when we are for the most part physically confined to our home.

We can channel the emotions we have been experiencing with this confinement to bring ourselves closer to the story. More than that, we also have the gift of using the story of the Israelites' exodus from their narrow place to channel the mindfulness necessary to keep us free in our minds in the current situation. For this, we must be intentional in praying, maintaining our faith, and taking care of ourselves and each other. Every day we have the opportunity to do things that help us feel that we are leaving our "narrow place," even if we do not walk through a parted sea to do it.

-- Exodus Story
Source : Original

We are going to move to the living room for the part of the Seder where we tell the story of the Exodus. As the grown-ups read the story, we will pause and ask you, "What does that sound like?" Just as when we read books and you use your piano and guitar to create music that helps us  feel  the story, we want you to help us feel the story of the Exodus! Let's go!

-- Exodus Story
Source : PJ Library

The first Passover happened long ago in the far-away country of Egypt. A mean and powerful king, called Pharaoh, ruled Egypt. Worried that the Jewish people would one day fight against him, Pharaoh decided that these people must become his slaves. As slaves, the Jewish people worked very hard. Every day, from morning until night, they hammered, dug, and carried heavy bricks. They built palaces and cities and worked without rest. The Jewish people hated being slaves. They cried and asked God for help. God chose a man named Moses to lead the Jewish people.

Moses went to Pharaoh and said, “God is not happy with the way you treat the Jewish people. He wants you to let the Jewish people leave Egypt and go into the desert, where they will be free.” But Pharaoh stamped his foot and shouted, “No, I will never let the Jewish people go!” Moses warned, “If you do not listen to God, many terrible things, called plagues, will come to your land.”  But Pharaoh would not listen, and so the plagues arrived. First, the water turned to blood. Next, frogs and, later, wild animals ran in and out of homes. Balls of hail fell from the sky and bugs, called locusts, ate all of the Egyptians’ food.

Each time a new plague began, Pharaoh would cry, “Moses, I’ll let the Jewish people go. Just stop this horrible plague!” Yet no sooner would God take away the plague than Pharaoh would shout: “No, I’ve changed my mind. The Jews must stay!” So God sent more plagues. Finally, as the tenth plague arrived, Pharaoh ordered the Jews to leave Egypt.

Fearful that Pharaoh might again change his mind, the Jewish people packed quickly. They had no time to prepare food and no time to allow their dough to rise into puffy bread. They had only enough time to make a flat, cracker-like bread called matzah. They hastily tied the matzah to their backs and ran from their homes.

The people had not travelled far before Pharaoh commanded his army to chase after them and bring them back to Egypt. The Jews dashed forward, but stopped when they reached a large sea. The sea was too big to swim across. Frightened that Pharaoh’s men would soon reach them, the people prayed to God, and a miracle occurred. The sea opened up. Two walls of water stood in front of them and a dry, sandy path stretched between the walls. The Jews ran across. Just as they reached the other side, the walls of water fell and the path disappeared. The sea now separated the Jews from the land of Egypt. They were free!

Each year at Passover, we eat special foods, sing songs, tell stories, and participate in a seder – a special meal designed to help us remember this miraculous journey from slavery to freedom.

-- Exodus Story
Source : Original

Now that we've told the story, let's reflect a bit on what it means to tell it this year in particular. The experience of the Exodus was a peak of uncertainty for the Israelites. All of what they've known, all their ways of meeting their needs - they were gone. They lived through the plagues; we see that suffering came first before redemption. Then they left everything they'd known very suddenly, and even though they were slaves in Egypt and they had no freedom, everything was still predictable and humans tend to like predictability. They had to take on faith that G-D was leading them to a better place after their suffering and in a time of total uncertainty and unpredictability.

So, how do you think the Israelites felt their first night in the desert?

We may have fears that what is on the other side of this coronavirus plague is scary. How does the Israelites' experience help us learn to trust?

-- Exodus Story
Source : Original

Last night for the First Seder, we told the story of the Exodus with music. Tonight, we are going to mix it up and play a game! This game is called "Things in a Bag." I have put a dozen random objects in this bag. Now that we have already retold the story, we will each take a turn pulling one mystery item out of the bag. You have to connect the item to the Passover story in some way!

For example, what would Moses do with the object? Or, how would Pharoah, the Egyptians, Aaaron, Miriam, or even one of the plagues use the item? If you can't come up with an idea for a character in the Passover story, then think about how the item could be used in the Seder instead.

We'll all take a couple turns!

-- Ten Plagues

In Talmud Tractate Megillah 10b we are told, as the Jews are singing praises to God for drowning the Egyptians, the angels wish to sing as well. God quiets the angels, saying, “The works of my hands are drowning in the sea, and you wish to sing praises?!”

As we rejoice at our deliverance from slavery, we acknowledge that our freedom was hard-earned. We regret that our freedom came at the cost of the Egyptians’ suffering, for we are all human beings made in the image of God. We pour out a drop of wine for each of the plagues as we recite them.

דָּם Blood | dam |

צְפַרְדֵּֽעַ Frogs | tzfardeiya |

כִּנִּים Lice | kinim |

עָרוֹב Beasts | arov |

דֶּֽבֶר Cattle disease | dever |

שְׁחִין Boils | sh’chin |

בָּרָד Hail | barad |

אַרְבֶּה Locusts | arbeh |

חֹֽשֶׁךְ Darkness | choshech |

מַכַּת בְּכוֹרוֹת Death of the Firstborn | makat b’chorot |

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

One of most beloved songs in the Passover Seder is "Dayeinu". Dayeinu commemorates a long list of miraculous things God did, any one of which would have been pretty amazing just by itself. For example, “Had God only taken us out of Egypt but not punished the Egyptians – it would have been enough.” Dayeinu, translated liberally, means, “Thank you, God, for overdoing it.”

Dayeinu is a reminder to never forget all the miracles in our lives. When we stand and wait impatiently for the next one to appear, we are missing the point of life. Instead, we can actively seek a new reason to be grateful, a reason to say “Dayeinu.”

Had God brought us out of Egypt, and not executed judgments against the Egyptians, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God executed judgments against the Egyptians, and not their gods, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God executed judgments against their gods and not put to death their firstborn, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God put to death their firstborn, and not given us their riches, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God given us their riches, and not split the Sea for us, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God split the Sea for us, and not led us through it on dry land, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God led us through it on dry land, and not sunk our foes in it, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God sunk our foes in it, and not satisfied our needs in the desert for forty years, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God satisfied our needs in the desert for forty years, and not fed us the manna, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God fed us the manna, and not given us the Sabbath, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God given us the Sabbath, and not brought us to Mount Sinai, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God brought us to Mount Sinai, and not given us the Torah, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God given us the Torah, and not brought us into Israel, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God brought us into Israel, and not built the Temple for us, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

We get to sing along now to a few of the verses.

אִלּוּ הוֹצִיאָֽנוּ מִמִּצְרַֽיִם, דַּיֵּנוּ

Ilu ho-tsi, Ho-tsi-a-nu, Ho-tsi-a-nu mi-Mitz-ra-yim, Ho-tsi-a-nu mi-Mitz-ra-yim, Da-ye-nu!
If he had brought us all out of Egypt, it would have been enough!

CHORUS: .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu!

אִלּוּ נָתַן לָֽנוּ אֶת־הַשַּׁבָּת , דַּיֵּנוּ

Ilu na-tan, na-tan la-nu, Na-tan la-nu et-ha-Sha-bat, Na-tan la-nu et-ha-Sha-bat, Da-ye-nu!
If he had given us Shabbat it would have been enough!

CHORUS: .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu!

אִלּוּ נָתַן לָֽנוּ אֶת־הַתּוֹרָה, דַּיֵּנוּ

Ilu na-tan, na-tan la-nu, Na-tan la-nu et-ha-To-rah, Na-tan la-nu et-ha-To-rah, Da-ye-nu!
If he had given us the Torah it would have been enough!

CHORUS: .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu!
.. .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu!

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Original

Now, let's go around the table and share our own "Dayenus" before we have the second cup of wine/juice. What are you grateful for?

...

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Rachtzah
Source : Traditional

רחצה

Rachtzah

Wash hands while reciting the traditional blessing for washing the hands:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְשָׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָּנוּ עַל נְטִילַת יָדַיִם.

Baruch atah Adonai Eloheinu melech ha-olam, asher kid'shanu b'mitzvotav, v'tzivanu al n'tilat yadayim.

Praised are you, Adonai, Lord our God, Ruler of the universe, who has taught us the way of holiness through commandments, commanding us to wash our hands.

Motzi-Matzah
Source : JewishBoston.com

The blessing over the meal and matzah | motzi matzah | מוֹצִיא מַצָּה

The familiar hamotzi blessing marks the formal start of the meal. Because we are using matzah instead of bread, we add a blessing celebrating this mitzvah.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, הַמּוֹצִיא לֶֽחֶם מִן הָאָֽרֶץ

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, hamotzi lechem min ha-aretz.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who brings bread from the land.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתַָיו וְצִוָּֽנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מַצָּה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat matzah.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to eat matzah.

Distribute and eat the top and middle matzah for everyone to eat.

Motzi-Matzah
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

We have now told the story of Passover…but wait! We’re not quite done. There are still some symbols on our seder plate we haven’t talked about yet. Rabban Gamliel would say that whoever didn’t explain the shank bone, matzah, and marror (or bitter herbs) hasn’t done Passover justice.

The shank bone represents the Pesach, the special lamb sacrifice made in the days of the Temple for the Passover holiday. It is called the pesach, from the Hebrew word meaning “to pass over,” because God passed over the houses of our ancestors in Egypt when visiting plagues upon our oppressors.

The matzah reminds us that when our ancestors were finally free to leave Egypt, there was no time to pack or prepare. Our ancestors grabbed whatever dough was made and set out on their journey, letting their dough bake into matzah as they fled.

The bitter herbs provide a visceral reminder of the bitterness of slavery, the life of hard labor our ancestors experienced in Egypt.

Motzi-Matzah
Source : Original

I'd like to add one more thought about the matzah. When the Israelites left Egypt, they decided to make bread. They did not  decide  to make matzah - they intended to make bread. However, the sun baked the flour and water they carried too quickly, turning it into flat, unleavened matzah.

The Israelites could have said, "We ruined our bread! It is garbage now! This is horrible!" Instead, they made do with what they had and moved forward. Now, matzah is one of the most central symbols of Pesach. It holds a great deal of meaning.

I think we may look back on this time and have the same thought process. We can reflect on it and say, "That was so horrible! We missed our school, our friends, our activities, and everything was different!" But we can also reflect on it and say, we made do with what we had, and we moved forward, and it was a very meaningful time for us individually, as a family, and as a society.

Maror
Source : www.bangitout.com
MarRoarr

 maror

Maror

Take a small amount of maror and a small amount of charoset together (but not so much charoset that the bitter taste of maror is neutralized). Recite the following blessing and eat them together:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָּנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מָרוֹר.

Baruch atah Adonai Eloheinu melech ha-olam, asher kid'shanu b'mitzvotav v'tzivanu al achilat maror.

Praised are you, Adonai, Lord our God, Ruler of the universe, who has made us holy with Your commandments, commanding us to eat the bitter herb.

Koreich

Prepare sandwich of matza, maror, and charoset. This recalls for us what Hillel did when the Temple existed: He enwrapped the Paschal lamb, the matzo and the bitter herbs to eat them as one, in fulfillment of the Torah verse, "with matzot and maror they shall eat it. (Numbers 9:11). It also reminds us that life is an integration of the bitter and the sweet.

Shulchan Oreich
Source : Haggadot.com
Let's Eat!

What's on your dinner table? 

Tzafun

Finding and eating the Afikomen | tzafoon | צָפוּן

Traditionally, the Afikomen is hidden during the meal, for the children to find later. This ceremony reminds us that what is broken can be repaired and that what is lost can be regained, as long as we remember it and search for it.

The playfulness of finding the afikomen also reminds us that we balance our solemn memories of slavery with a joyous celebration of freedom. As we eat the afikomen, our last taste of matzah for the evening, we are grateful for moments of silliness and happiness in our lives.

Tzafun
Source : http://articles.aish.com.s3.amazonaws.com/holidays/pesach/pass00_family_print_and_play_find_the_afikoman_maze_400x306.gif
afikoman time

Bareich

Pour the third cup of wine and recite Birkat Hamazon (Blessing after the Meal).

שִׁיר הַמַּעֲלוֹת:בְּשׁוּב יהוה אֶת־שִׁיבַת צִיּוֹן הָיִ֫ינוּ כְּחֹלְמִים. אָז יִמָּלֵא שְׂחוֹק פִּינוּ וּלְשׁוֹנֵנוּ רִנָּה, אָז יֹאמְרוּ בַגּוֹיִם, הִגְדִּיל יְיָ לַעֲשׂוֹת עִם אֵלֶּה. הִגְדִּיל יְיָ לַעֲשׂוֹת עִמָּנוּ, הָיִינוּ שְׂמֵחִים. שׁוּבָה יְיָ אֶת שְׁבִיתֵנוּ, כַּאֲפִיקִים בַּנֶּגֶב. הַזֹּרְעִים בְּדִמְעָה בְּרִנָּה יִקְצֹרוּ. הָלוֹךְ יֵלֵךְ וּבָכֹה נֹשֵׂא מֶשֶׁךְ הַזָּרַע, בֹּא יָבֹא בְרִנָּה נֹשֵׂא אֲלֻמֹּתָיו.

Shir Hama’alot, b’shuv Adonai et shee-vat Tzion, ha-yeenu k’chol meem. Az y’ma-lei s’chok pee-nu u’l-sho-nei-nu reena, az yo-m’ru va-goyim, heeg-deel Adonai la-asot eem eleh. Heeg-deel Adonai la-asot eemanu, ha-yee-nu s’mei-cheem. Shuva Adonai et sh’vee-tei-nu, ka-afee-keem ba-negev. Ha-zor-eem b’deem-ah b’reena yeek-tzo-ru. Ha-loch yei-lech u-va-cho no-sei me-shech hazara, bo yavo v’reena, no-sei alu-mo-tav.

When the Lord returns us from exile back to Zion, it will be as though in a dream. We will laugh and sing with joy. It shall be said around the world: “The Lord has done great things for them.” The Lord did great things for us, and we shall rejoice. God, restore our fortunes. We shall be like streams in the Negev. Those who sow in tears shall reap in joy. Though the farmer bears the measure of seed to the field in sadness, he shall come home with joy, bearing his sheaves.

Leader: רַבּוֹתַי נְבָרֵךְ. Rabotai n’vareich.

Participants: יְהִי שֵׁם יְיָ מְבֹרָךְ מֵעַתָּה וְעַד עוֹלָם. Y’hee sheim Adonai m’vo-rach mei-atah v’ad olam.

Leader: יְהִי שֵׁם יְיָ מְבֹרָךְ מֵעַתָּה וְעַד עוֹלָם. בִּרְשׁוּת מָרָנָן וְרַבָּנָן וְרַבּוֹתַי נְבָרֵך (אֱלֹהֵינוּ) שֶׁאָכַלְנוּ מִשֶּׁלוֹ.

Y’hee sheim Adonai m’vorach mei-atah v’ad olam. Beer-shut maranan v’rabanan v’rabotai, n’vareich (Eloheinu) she’achalnu mee-shelo.

Participants: בָּרוּךְ (אֱלֹהֵינוּ) שֶׁאָכַלְנוּ מִשֶּׁלוֹ וּבְטוּבוֹ חָיִּינוּ. Baruch (Eloheinu) she’achalnu mishelo uv’tuvo chayinu.

Leader: בָּרוּךְ (אֱלֹהֵינוּ) שֶׁאָכַלְנוּ מִשֶּׁלוֹ וּבְטוּבוֹ חָיִּינוּ. Baruch (Eloheinu) she’achalnu mishelo uv’tuvo chayinu.

All together: בָּרוּךְ הוּא וּבָרוּך שְׁמוֹ. Baruch hu u-varuch sh’mo.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, הַזָּן אֶת הָעוֹלָם כֻּלּוֹ בְּטוּבוֹ בְּחֵן בְּחֶסֶד וּבְרַחֲמִים הוּא נוֹתֵן לֶחֶם לְכָל בָּשָׂר, כִּי לְעוֹלָם חַסְדּוֹ. וּבְטוּבוֹ הַגָּדוֹל תָּמִיד לֹא חָסַר לָנוּ וְאַל יֶחְסַר לָנוּ מָזוֹן לְעוֹלָם וָעֶד. בַּעֲבוּר שְׁמוֹ הַגָּדוֹל כִּי הוּא אֵל זָן וּמְפַרְנֵס לַכֹּל וּמֵטִיב לַכֹּל וּמֵכִין מָזוֹן לְכָל בְּרִיּוֹתָיו אֲשֶׁר בָּרָא. בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, הַזָּן אֶת הַכֹּל.

Baruch atah Adonai, Eloheinu melech ha-olam, hazan et ha-olam kulo b’tuvo, b’chein b’chesed uv-rachamim, hu noten lechem l’chol basar, ki l’olam chasdo, uv-tuvo hagadol, tamid lo chasar lanu v’al yechsar lanu mazon l’olam va’ed. Ba-avur sh’mo hagadol, ki hu Eil zan um’farneis lakol, u-meitiv lakol u-meichin mazon l’chol-b’riyotav asher bara. Baruch atah Adonai, hazan et hakol.

Praised are you, Adonai, Lord our God, Ruler of the universe, who nourishes the whole world. Your kindness endures forever. May we never be in want of sustenance. God sustains us all, doing good to all, and providing food for all creation. Praised are you, Adonai, who sustains all.

נוֹדֶה לְךָ יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינוּ עַל שֶׁהִנְחַלְתָּ לַאֲבוֹתֵינוּ אֶרֶץ חֶמְדָּה טוֹבָה וּרְחָבָה, וְעַל שֶׁהוֹצֵאתָנוּ יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֵאֶרֶץ מִצְרַיִם וּפְדִיתָנוּ מִבֵּית עֲבָדִים, וְעַל בְּרִיתְךָ שֶׁחָתַמְתָּ בִּבְשָׂרֵנוּ, וְעַל תּוֹרָתְךָ שֶׁלִמַּדְתָּנוּ, וְעַל חֻקֶּיךָ שֶׁהוֹדַעְתָּנוּ, וְעַל חַיִּים חֵן וָחֶסֶד שֶׁחוֹנַנְתָּנוּ, וְעַל אֲכִילַת מָזוֹן שָׁאַתָּה זָן וּמְפַרְנֵס אוֹתָנוּ תָּמִיד בְּכָל יוֹם וּבְכָל עֵת וּבְכָל שָׁעָה.

We thank you, Adonai, Lord our God, for having given a beautiful, good, and spacious land; for having taken us out from the land of Egypt and redeemed us from the house of slavery; for Your covenant which You sealed in our flesh; for Your Torah which You taught us; for the life, grace and kindness You have granted us; and for the food with which You always sustain us.

וְעַל הַכֹּל יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינוּ אֲנַחְנוּ מוֹדִים לָךְ וּמְבָרְכִים אוֹתָךְ יִתְבָּרַךְ שִׁמְךָ בְּפִי כָל חַי תָּמִיד לְעוֹלָם וָעֶד. כַּכָּתוּב, וְאָכַלְתָּ וְשָׂבָעְתָּ וּבֵרַכְתָּ אֶת יְיָ אֱלֹהֶיךָ עַל הָאָרֶץ הַטֹּבָה אֲשֶׁר נָתַן לָךְ. בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, עַל הָאָרֶץ וְעַל הַמָּזוֹן.

​וּבְנֵה יְרוּשָׁלַיִם עִיר הַקֹּדֶשׁ בִּמְהֵרָה בְיָמֵינוּ. בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, בּוֹנֵה בְרַחֲמָיו יְרוּשָׁלָיִם. אָמֵן.

Uv’nei Y’rushalayim ir hakodesh bimheira v’yameinu. Baruch atah Adonai, boneh v’rachamav Y’rushalayim. Amein.

The Blessing after the Meal concludes by drinking the Third Cup of wine, while reclining to the left.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָפֶן.

Baruch atah Adonai, Eloheinu melech ha-olam, borei p'ri hagafen.

Praised are you, Adonai, Lord of the universe, who has created the fruit of the vine.

Hallel
Source : Compilation

In the years of wandering in the desert, Miriam's well accompanied the Israelites. Accodring to tradition, Miriam's well is still with us. Every Saturday night, at the end of Shabbat, its waters flow out into wells everywhere in the world.

While the return of Elijah is left to the future and all its potential, Miriam is present with us always. She and her waters sustain us as we await Elijah. She is here to provide healing, inspiration, and wisdom.

There is still a long journey to freedom, a long time before Elijah will herald the Messicanic age. Miriam calls is to work for -- not to passively wait for -- that day. She sustains us with the most basic substance on earth: water. She also lifts our hears as she leads us in song and dance. 

Elijah's cup remains untouched by us. But we now drink from Miriam's cup, the nurtuing waters of Miriam's well.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה ה' אֱ-לֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם שֶׁהַכֹּל נִהְיָה בִּדְבָרוֹ.

Barukh ata Adonai Eloheinu melekh ha’olam shehakol niyah bidvaro.

Praised are you, Eternal our God, Ruler of the Universe, by whose word all things are created.

 
ושאבתם מים בששון 
ממעייני הישועה. 
מים, מים, מים מים 
הוי מים בששון. 
 

Ushavtem mayim b'sason 
mimainei hayeshua .
Ushavtem mayim b'sason 
mimainei hayeshua 

Chorus: 
Mayim - Mayim - Mayim - Mayim 
Hey, mayim b'sason 
Mayim - Mayim - Mayim - Mayim
Hey, mayim b'sason 

Hey, hey, hey, hey 
Mayim - Mayim 
Mayim - Mayim
Mayim - Mayim - b'sason

Mayim - Mayim 
Mayim - Mayim
Mayim - Mayim - b'sason

Hallel

Tonight we welcome two prophets: not only Elijah, but also Miriam, sister of Moses. Elijah is a symbol of messianic redemption at the end of time; Miriam, of redemption in our present lives.

Please rise and sing as you are able as we open the doors of Hillel to welcome the prophets.

אֵלִיָּהוּ הַנָּבִיא אֵלִיָּהוּ הַתִשְׁבִּי

אֵלִיָּהוּ הַגִּלְעָדִי

במְהֵרָה בְיָמֵנוּ יָבוא אֵלֵינוּ

עִם מָשִׁיחַ בֶּן דָוִד, עִם מָשִׁיחַ בֶּן דָוִד

Eliyahu ha-navi, Eliyahu ha-Tishbi,

Eliyahu (3x) ha-Giladi.

Bimheirah v'yameinu, yavo ei-leinu

im Mashiach ben David (2x)

Elijah, the prophet; Elijiah, the Tishbite; Elijah, of Gilead! Come quickly in our days with the Messiah from the line of David.

Hallel

As we come to the end of the seder, we drink one more glass of wine. With this final cup, we give thanks for the experience of celebrating Passover together, for the traditions that help inform our daily lives and guide our actions and aspirations.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the fourth and final glass of wine! 

Conclusion
Source : Velveteen Rabbi

Counting the Omer                                                                ספירת העמר
(skip this on the first night - the Omer count begins on the second night)


“Omer” means “measures.” When the Temple stood, it was customary to bring harvest
offerings three times a year, at Sukkot, Pesach, and Shavuot. The tradition of Counting the
Omer dates to those days. We measured the seven weeks between planting new barley and
harvesting it; then offered a measure, in thanks, to our Source.

Now that few of us are barley farmers, and the Temple no longer stands, practices like
counting the Omer must take on new meaning. Shavuot is the anniversary of the day when we
accepted the teachings of Torah at Sinai a holiday to anticipate joyfully. We count the Omer
the way we count days to birthdays or vacations, eager for what’s coming.

Tonight we celebrate our freedom from slavery; in fifty days we will celebrate our acceptance
of the Torah’s teachings. Counting the Omer reminds us that we are freed not only from, but
also toward.


בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ רוּחַ הַעולָם,

Baruch atah, Adonai, eloheinu ruach ha’olam,

אָשֶר קִדשָנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָנוּ

asher kidshanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu

אַל סְפִירַת הַעמֶר.

al s’firat ha’omer.


Blessed are you, Adonai, Breath of Life, who sanctifies us with the commandment to count the
Omer.

הַיוֹם יוֹם אֶחַד לָעמֶר
Hayom yom echad la’omer! !

Today is the first day of the Omer!

Songs
Source : http://www.lyricstime.com/shalom-jerusalem-hinei-ma-tov-behold-how-good-lyrics.html
It is traditional at this point in the seder, to sing songs of praise. This is one of my favorites for this event.

Hinei ma tov umanaim

Shevet achim gam yachad

Hinei ma tov umanaim

Shevet achim gam yachad

Behold how good and

How pleasant it is

For brothers to dwell together

Songs
Source : me

I Just Can’t Go to the King

to the tune of 

“I Just Can’t Wait To Be King”

(Moses)

I’m gonna see a mighty king. 

I’m feeling mighty scared.

(Aaron)

Well, Moses, I’ll be there with you 

So you’ll be well prepared.

(Moses)

I’ve never been too good with words. 

I stutter and I squeak. 

My hands are wet, my throat is dry 

Each time I try to speak.

(Aaron)

Well, Moses, don’t be scared about a thing.

(Moses)

Oh, I just can’t go to the king! 

I’ll be saying, “Do this.” 

I’ll be saying, “See them.” 

I’ll be saying, “Stop that.” 

I’ll be saying, “Free them. 

Free them all to leave today. 

Free them all to live God’s way.”

(Aaron)

The Pharaoh needs to know he needs to 

Have a change of heart. 

Or God will make his cows get sick 

And make the Red Sea part.

(Both)

The two of us will go tell Pharaoh, 

“Let my people go.” 

We know exactly what we’ll do if 

Pharaoh tells us no.

We’ll warn him of the plagues that God 

will bring. 

Oh, we’re both gonna go to the king!

We’ll be saying, “Do this.” 

We’ll be saying, “See them.” 

We’ll be saying, “Stop that.” 

We’ll be saying, “Free them.”

“Have respect for every living thing. 

Pharaoh, don’t be such a dingaling.” 

Now this will be our final time to sing: 

Oh, we’re both gonna go to the king!

Songs
Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses (to the tune of "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious")

Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses The story of the Passover our Seder meal discloses Reminds us that the life of slaves was not a bed of roses Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses

Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ai Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ai

The Jews were bound in Egypt and were feeling rather low So Moses went to Pharaoh and said “Let my people go.” Pharoah said “Be gone with you,” which wasn’t very nice So God commenced a run of plagues including frogs and lice.

Oh, Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses The story of the Passover our Seder meal discloses We will eat gefilte fish, though some will hold their noses Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses

Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ai Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ai

The plagues were unrelenting and included hail and boils Not to mention dreadful fates for Egypt's boys and goils. Pharaoh he surrendered, then with slightly soggy feet The Jews walked to their freedom and that’s it, come on, let’s eat!

Oh, Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses The story of the Passover our Seder meal discloses Finish the Haggadah before anybody dozes Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses