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Introduction

The seder officially begins with a physical act: lighting the candles. Before the start of every Sabbath or Jewish holiday, it is traditional for the women of the household (or any individual) to light two candles in honor of the holiness of the day. As we light the festival candles, we acknowledge that as they brighten our Passover table, good thoughts, good words, and good deeds brighten our days. In Jewish tradition, lighting candles and saying a blessing over them marks a time of transition, from the day that is ending to the one that is beginning, from ordinary time to sacred time. Lighting the candles is an important part of our Passover celebration because their flickering light reminds us of the importance of keeping the fragile flame of freedom alive in the world.

Introduction
Shehechyanu

Baruch atah, Adonai Eloheinu, Melech haolam, shehecheyanu v’kiy’manu v’higianu laz’man hazeh.

Praise to You, Adonai our God, Sovereign of the universe, for giving us life, for sustaining us, and for enabling us to reach this season.

- See more at: http://www.reformjudaism.org/practice/prayers-blessings/passover-evening-blessings-kiddush-blessing-over-wine-shabbat-version#sthash.qpyYHOKu.dpuf

Introduction
Order of the Seder

Our Passover meal is called a seder, which means “order” in Hebrew, because we go through specific steps as we retell the story of our ancestors’ liberation from slavery. Some people like to begin their seder by reciting or singing the names of the 14 steps—this will help you keep track of how far away the meal is!

Introduction
Introduction
Source : J. Potts, Michael Varon, Chabad.org

LEADER:

When a Seder falls on Saturday night, the end of Shabbat, we say Havdalah before lighting the festival candles. Havdallah is a ceremony that marks the separation between Shabbat and the beginning of the week. Tonight, we mark the separation between the end of Shabbat and another day of Pesach, ben kodesh l'kodesh. The havdalah candle is comprised of many wicks braided to come together to create a large, single flame - much larger, brighter and warmer than if there were only a singlewick. Some questions we can consider are:

  • Why make such a big deal about the separate wicks if they are a single flame?
  • Which is more important - the separate wicks or the single flame? How does this add meaning to our Passover seder tonight?

The Blessing over Wine

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּֽפֶן.

Baruch atah, Adonai, Elohaynu melech ha’olam, boray pri hagafen.

Blessed are You, God, our Lord, King of the universe, Creator of the fruit of the vine.

The Blessing over Spices

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא מִינֵי בְשָׂמִים.

Baruch atah, Adonai, Elohaynu melech ha’olam, boray minay vesamim.

Blessed are You, God, our Lord, King of the universe, Creator of the different spices.

The Blessing over the Candle

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא מְאוֹרֵי הָאֵשׁ.

Baruch atah, Adonai, Elohaynu melech ha’olam, boray me’oray ha’aysh.

Blessed are You, God, our Lord, King of the universe, Creator of the fire’s lights.

The Blessing over Havdalah

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, הַמַּבְדִיל בֵּין קֹֽדֶשׁ לְחוֹל, בֵּין אוֹר לְחֹֽשֶׁךְ, בֵּין יִשְׂרָאֵל לָעַמִּים, בֵּין יוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי לְשֵֽׁשֶׁת יְמֵי הַמַּעֲשֶׂה. בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, הַמַּבְדִיל בֵּין קֹֽדֶשׁ לְחוֹל.

Baruch atah, Adonai, Elohaynu melech ha’olam, hamavdilbayn kodesh lechol bayn or lechoshech bayn Yisrael la’amim bayn yom hashevi’i leshayshet yemay hama’aseh.Baruch atah, Adonai, hamavdil bayn kodesh lechol.

Blessed are You, God, our Lord, King of the universe, who separates between the holy and the profane; between the light and dark; between Israel and the other nations; between the seventh day and the six days of the week. Blessed are You, God, who separates between the holy and the profane.

Kadesh
Source : Deborah Putnoi Art
First Cup of Wine

Kadesh

Jewish celebrations usually include wine as a symbol of joy.

Wine sanctifies an occasion and makes it holy.

During the Passover Seder we drink four cups of wine, why four?

In the Book of Exodus, God convinced the Jews to leave Egypt using four statements:

I shall take you out
I shall rescue you
I shall redeem you
I shall bring you

We toast each of these statements with a cup of wine.

Pour and raise your first cup of wine/grape juice. This cup is dedicated to the renewal of spring, to the renewal of ourselves.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink your first cup of wine/grape juice!

Kadesh
Source : Original

Now, we're going to take the wine/juice that we've poured and each add to Elijah's cup.

Now let's do the same from our water glasses to fill Miriam's cup.

Combining our actions together is what will help Elijah come to ourworld.

 We set an extra place for Elijah and we'll open the door and invite him in later. Miriam was Moses's sister and we honor her for how she helped Moses wich made our story possible today.

Kadesh

On Pesach the four cups of wine remind us of four words of Freedom in Hashem’s promise, and we drink them to show how happy we are to be free.

Write four things which make you feel happy or free.

  1. _____________________
  2. _____________________
  3. _____________________
  4. ______________________
Urchatz
Source : http://www.ritualwell.org/ritual/urchatz-%E2%80%94-dip-hands

The beginning of the seder seems strange. We start with kiddush as we normally would when we begin any festive meal. Then we wash, but without a blessing, and break bread without eating it.

What’s going on here?

It seems that the beginning of the seder is kind of a false start. We act as if we are going to begin the meal but then we realize that we can’t – we can’t really eat this meal until we understand it, until we tell the story of the exodus from Egypt. So we interrupt our meal preparations with maggid (telling the story). Only once we have told the story do we make kiddush again, wash our hands again (this time with a blessing) and break bread and eat it! In order to savor this meal, in order to appreciate the sweet taste of Passover, we must first understand it.

Karpas
Source : A Family Pesach Seder in Rhyme

Our tale to tell, both happy and sad,

like all great lore, some good, some bad

On our table the symbols abound

you needn't look far, they're all around

Look on your plate, for parsley green

a sign of Spring when it is seen.

And somewhere near there is salt water,

tears of slavery, hard work with mortar

And so together, we now recall

the green around, the tears that fall.

Ba-ruch A-tah A-do-nai, E-lo-hei-nu Me-lech Ha-o-lam,

Bo-rei pe-ree ha-a-da-mah.

Oh Holy One of Blessing, Your presence fills creation,

We praise You for creating the fruit of the ground!

Yachatz

"Break the middle matzah on the matzah plate. This is called the Yachatz --literally-- the breaking. We break the matzah and hide one part (the Afikomen). We recognize that liberation is made by imperfect people, broken, fragmented — so don’t be waiting until you are totally pure, holy, spiritually centered, and psychologically healthy to get involved in tikkun (the healing and repair of the world). It will be imperfect people, wounded healers, who do the healing as we simultaneously work on ourselves." -Rabbi Michael Lerner

We simply break the matzo, leaving the smaller section on the Seder plate. We wrap the larger piece and put it away for afikomen. Why do we do this?

Passover is a commemoration of the exodus from Egypt. The biblical narrative relates that the Israelites left Egypt in such haste they could not wait for their bread dough to rise; the bread, when baked, was matzo. The other reason for eating matzo is symbolic: On the one hand, matzo symbolizes redemption and freedom, but it is also, "poor man's bread". Thus it serves as a reminder to be humble, and to not forget what life was like in servitude. Also, leaven symbolizes corruption and pride as leaven "puffs up". Eating the "bread of affliction" is a lesson in humility and an act that enhances the appreciation of freedom.

Yachatz

Uncover and hold up the three pieces of matzah and everyone say together:

All Together: “This is the bread of affliction which our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt. Let all who are hungry come and eat; let all who are needy come and celebrate the Passover with us. Now we are here; next year may we be in the Land of Israel. Now we are slaves; next year may we be free.”

Yachatz
Source : ayeka -original
"Let All Who Are Hungry"  

We are wired to give. 

One of the worst feelings in the world is not being needed by others. 

I once asked a group of high school kids: "When was the last time you felt really good about yourselves?" Each responded by sharing an act of kindness and selfless giving. 

But a slave has nothing to offer. Drained of energy and time, the slave's emotional and physical resources are depleted. With no ability to give, the slave loses his/her sense of humanity, and feels empty, worthless, and incapable of generosity.

And so we begin the Seder by proclaiming: "Let all who are hungry come and eat!" We are no longer slaves with nothing to give. No matter what our situation, we defiantly declare that we have food in abundance and that we can't wait to share it with the world - a moment of exaggerated and piercing "largeness". 

This sentence should not be read. It should be raucously screamed. It is tantamount to announcing: "I am a giving person! I am overflowing with goodness and kindness! I have a full tank of giving to share with everyone!"

Activity for Seder: Share a moment when you either carried out - or witnessed - an act of extraordinary giving. 

Maggid - Beginning

ּעֲבָדִים הָיִינוּ הָיִינו. עַתָּה בְּנֵי חוֹרִין

Avadim hayinu hayinu. Ata b’nei chorin.

We were slaves to Pharaoh in Egypt. Now we are free.

We were slaves to Pharaoh in Egypt, and God took us from there with a strong hand and outstretched arm. Had God not brought our ancestors out of Egypt, then even today we and our children and our grandchildren would still be slaves. Even if we were all wise, knowledgeable scholars and Torah experts, we would still be obligated to tell the story of the exodus from Egypt.

Maggid - Beginning
Avadim Hayinu in ASL

Kids Song: Avadim Hayinu with ASL

-- Four Questions
Source : Traditional

                 Maggid – Four Questions

מַהנִּשְּׁתַּנָה

?מַה נִּשְּׁתַּנָה הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה מִכָּל הַלֵּילוֹת

Mah nish-ta-na ha-lai-lah ha-zeh mikol ha-lei-lot?

Why is this night of Passover different from all other nights of the year?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָנוּ אוֹכְלִין חָמֵץ וּמַצָּה, הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה - כּוּלוֹ מַצָּה

She-b'chol ha-lei-lot anu och'lin cha-meitz u-matzah. Ha-laylah hazeh kulo matzah.

On all other nights, we eat either leavened or unleavened bread, why on this night do we eat only matzah?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָנוּ אוֹכְלִין שְׁאָר יְרָקוֹת, - הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה מָרוֹר

Sheb'chol ha-lei-lot anu och'lin sh'ar y'rakot. Ha-lai-lah h-azeh maror.

On all other nights, we eat vegetables of all kinds, why on this night must we eat bitter herbs?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אֵין אֶנוּ מַטְבִּילִין אֲפִילוּ פַּעַם אֶחָת, - הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה שְׁתֵּי פְעָמִים

Sheb'chol ha-lei-lot ein anu mat-beelin afee-lu pa-am echat.Ha-lai-lah hazeh sh'tei p'ameem.

On all other nights, we do not dip vegetables even once,
why on this night do we dip greens into salt water and bitter herbs into sweet haroset?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָנוּ אוֹכְלִין בֵּין יוֹשְׁבִין וּבֵין מְסֻבִּין, - הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה כֻּלָנו מְסֻ

Sheb’khol ha-lei-lot anu och-leem bein yo-shveen u-vein m’su-been, ha-lailah hazeh kulanu m’subeen.

On all other nights, everyone sits up straight at the table, why on this night do we recline and eat at leisure?

-- Four Children
Source : Original
The Four Children

The Haggadah tells us about four types of children. We can imagine these are actual children, or that they are the inner children in us. Their questions are above.

How might we answer each child's questions?

How do you imagine the faces of each type of child to look? Make an appropriate face for each one.

-- Four Children
Source : New American Haggadah

Some scholars believe there are four kinds of parents as well.

The Wise Parent is an utter bore. "Listen closely, because you are younger than I am," says the Wise Parent, "and I will go on and on about Jewish history, based on some foggy memories of my own religious upbringing, as well as an article in a Jewish journal I have recently skimmed." The Wise Parent must be faced with a small smile of dim interest.

The Wicked Parent tries to cram the story of our liberation into a set of narrow opinions about the world. "The Lord led us out of Egypt," the Wicked Parent says, "which is why I support a bloodthirsty foreign policy and am tired of certain types of people causing problems." The Wicked Parent should be told in a firm voice, "With a strong hand God rescued the Jews from bondage, but it was my own clumsy hand that spilled hot soup in your lap."

The Simple Parent does not grasp the concept of freedom. "There will be no macaroons until you eat all your brisket," says the Simple Parent, at a dinner honoring the liberation of oppressed peoples. "Also, stop slouching at the table." In answer to such statements, the Wise Child will roll his eyes in the direction of the ceiling and declare, "Let my people go!"

The Parent Who Is Unable to Inquire has had too much wine, and should be excused from the table.

-- Exodus Story

We are told that every person should see him/herself as having personally left Egypt. How can we fulfill this obligation of radical empathy?

The Hebrew word for Egypt, Mitzrayim, literally translates to "from narrow places." It implies this image of a restrained or confined space. We might not have personal memories of enslavement in Egypt, but we all have experiences with feeling restrained or confined. We can channel those emotions to bring ourselves closer to the story. But more than that, we also must channel the mindfulness necessary to take ourselves out of these narrow places and free ourselves.

As we read the story of the exodus, I invite you to reflect on the following question: What is something holding you back now, and how might you be able to free yourself?

-- Exodus Story

I want to preface our Maggid  by saying we will be telling the same story in three different ways: a scholarly view highlighting women in the Exodus, written in part by RBG; a rap song from Pharoah's eyes; and a yoga-based physical experience of the story. Each is relatively brief, but by including these different perspectives, my hope is that there will be a part of one of these tellings that you can connect with and find meaning and memory in.

-- Exodus Story
Source : AJWS
By Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Rabbi Lauren Holzblatt

On Passover, Jews are commanded to tell the story of the Exodus and to see ourselves as having lived through that story, so that we may better learn how to live our lives today. The stories we tell our children shape what they believe to be possible—which is why at Passover, we must tell the stories of the women who played a crucial role in the Exodus narrative.

The Book of Exodus, much like the Book of Genesis, opens in pervasive darkness. Genesis describes the earth as “unformed and void, with darkness over the surface of the deep.”1 In Exodus, darkness attends the accession of a new Pharaoh who feared the Israelites and so enslaved them. God alone lights the way out of the darkness in Genesis. But in Exodus, God has many partners, first among them, five brave women.

There is Yocheved, Moses’ mother, and Shifra and Puah, the famous midwives. Each defies Pharaoh’s decree to kill the Israelite baby boys. And there is Miriam, Moses’ sister, about whom the following midrash is taught:

[When Miriam’s only brother was Aaron] she prophesied… “my mother is destined to bear a son who will save Israel.” When [Moses] was born the whole house… filled with light[.] [Miriam’s] father arose and kissed her on the head, saying, “My daughter, your prophecy has been fulfilled.” But when they threw [Moses] into the river her father tapped her on the head saying, “Daughter, where is your prophecy?” So it is written, “And [Miriam] stood afar off to know what would be[come of] the latter part of her prophecy.”2

Finally, there is Pharaoh’s daughter Batya, who defies her own father and plucks baby Moses out of the Nile. The Midrash reminds us that Batya knew exactly what she doing:

When Pharaoh’s daughter’s handmaidens saw that she intended to rescue Moses, they attempted to dissuade her, and persuade her to heed her father. They said to her: “Our mistress, it is the way of the world that when a king issues a decree, it is not heeded by the entire world, but his children and the members of his household do observe it, and you wish to transgress your father’s decree?”3

But transgress she did.

These women had a vision leading out of the darkness shrouding their world. They were women of action, prepared to defy authority to make their vision a reality bathed in the light of the day.

Retelling the heroic stories of Yocheved, Shifra, Puah, Miriam and Batya reminds our daughters that with vision and the courage to act, they can carry forward the tradition those intrepid women launched.

While there is much light in today’s world, there remains in our universe disheartening darkness, inhumanity spawned by ignorance and hate. We see horrific examples in the Middle East, parts of Africa, and the Ukraine. The Passover story recalls to all of us—women and men—that with vision and action we can join hands with others of like mind, kindling lights along paths leading out of the terrifying darkness.

1 Genesis 1:2 2 Babylonian Talmud, Megillah 14a 3 Babylonian Talmud, Sotah 12b 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg is a Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Appointed by President William Jefferson Clinton in 1993, she is known as a strong voice for gender equality, the rights of workers, and separation between church and state.

Rabbi Lauren Holtzblatt is a rabbi at Adas Israel Congregation in Washington, D.C.. She is co-creator of two nationally recognized community engagement projects—MakomDC and the Jewish Mindfulness Center of Washington.

-- Exodus Story
Source : www.friendseder.com
Pharoah's Version the Passover Story

(RAPPED TO THE FRESH PRINCE OF BEL-AIR THEME SONG)

Now this is a story all about how

Some plagues came and flipped my smile into a frown

Now I need to pop this boil (Plague 6) – hey watch out for that bear (Plague 4)!

I’ll tell you how our firstborns were murdered (Plague 10) ’cause of Moses’s dare

Just West of the Nile born and raised,

Racing chariots was how I spent most of my days,

Being groomed for leadership, women galore,

Drinking with Moses some crazy tall pours

When my dad got sick and like that I understood

Egypt was mine - for bad or for good

I looked around at all the Israelites and man I got scared

Don’t overrun my home – I really did care!

The Israelites begged and pleaded with me day after day

’Cause I enslaved and made ’em bundle a crap-ton of hay

Making bricks for my cities, getting whipped in every pit

Then one day Moses murdered an Egyptian he hit

After many years away Moses came back just like that

He said God wanted me to free them – wearing a little Jew hat

I said I don’t think so, you need a breath of fresh air

Then the Nile turned to blood (Plague 1) – man it really wasn’t fair

Well, other plagues followed – all my cattle got gout (Plague 5)

Locusts filled up the whole sky (Plague 8), I started to doubt

In the end it was a no brainer, the choice just really clear

I let them go, then changed my mind, who else would make my beer?

I whistled for my chariot and when it came near

Its wheels were covered in frogs (Plague 2) – and hail (Plague 7) had

shattered the mirror

’Twas for the best because of lice (Plague 3) I’d shaved all my hair

But I thought “Man at least it’s dark” (Plague 9) – no one will be aware

I pulled up to the sea not realizing my fate

And I yelled to my soldiers – “Those Israelites are haters”

They chased them onto dry land – no time to beware

Those waves crashed down, and my kingdom was bare

-- Exodus Story
Source : https://www.thej.org/clientuploads/Virtual%20J/Passover_Yoga_For_Kids_Updated.pdf
Passover Yoga (1/3)

-- Exodus Story
Source : https://www.thej.org/clientuploads/Virtual%20J/Passover_Yoga_For_Kids_Updated.pdf
Passover Yoga (2/3)

-- Exodus Story
Source : https://www.thej.org/clientuploads/Virtual%20J/Passover_Yoga_For_Kids_Updated.pdf
Passover Yoga (3/3)

-- Ten Plagues
Source : Anonymous

In Talmud Tractate Megillah 10b we are told, as the Jews are singing praises to God for drowning the Egyptians, the angels wish to sing as well.  God quiets the angels, saying, “The works of my hands are drowning in the sea, and you wish to sing praises?!?”

As we rejoice at our deliverance from slavery, we acknowledge that our freedom was hard-earned. We regret that our freedom came at the cost of the Egyptians’ suffering, for we are all human beings made in the image of God. We pour out a drop of wine for each of the plagues as we recite them.

Dip a finger or a spoon into your wine glass for a drop for each plague.

These are the ten plagues which God brought down on the Egyptians:

דָּם Blood | dam |

צְפַרְדֵּֽעַFrogs | tzfardeiya |

כִּנִּים Lice | kinim |

עָרוֹב Beasts | arov |

דֶּֽבֶר Cattle disease | dever |

שְׁחִין Boils | sh’chin |

בָּרָד Hail | barad |

אַרְבֶּה Locusts | arbeh |

חֹֽשֶׁךְ Darkness | choshech |

מַכַּת בְּכוֹרוֹת Death of the Firstborn | makat b’chorot |

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

One of most beloved songs in the Passover Seder is "Dayeinu". Dayeinu commemorates a long list of miraculous things God did, any one of which would have been pretty amazing just by itself. For example, “Had God only taken us out of Egypt but not punished the Egyptians – it would have been enough.” Dayeinu, translated liberally, means, “Thank you, God, for overdoing it.”

Dayeinu is a reminder to never forget all the miracles in our lives. When we stand and wait impatiently for the next one to appear, we are missing the point of life. Instead, we can actively seek a new reason to be grateful, a reason to say “Dayeinu.”

Had God brought us out of Egypt, and not executed judgments against the Egyptians, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God executed judgments against the Egyptians, and not their gods, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God executed judgments against their gods and not put to death their firstborn, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God put to death their firstborn, and not given us their riches, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God given us their riches, and not split the Sea for us, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God split the Sea for us, and not led us through it on dry land, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God led us through it on dry land, and not sunk our foes in it, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God sunk our foes in it, and not satisfied our needs in the desert for forty years, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God satisfied our needs in the desert for forty years, and not fed us the manna, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God fed us the manna, and not given us the Sabbath, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God given us the Sabbath, and not brought us to Mount Sinai, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God brought us to Mount Sinai, and not given us the Torah, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God given us the Torah, and not brought us into Israel, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

Had God brought us into Israel, and not built the Temple for us, It would have been enough – Dayyenu

We get to sing along now to a few of the verses.

אִלּוּ הוֹצִיאָֽנוּ מִמִּצְרַֽיִם, דַּיֵּנוּ

Ilu ho-tsi, Ho-tsi-a-nu, Ho-tsi-a-nu mi-Mitz-ra-yim, Ho-tsi-a-nu mi-Mitz-ra-yim, Da-ye-nu!
If he had brought us all out of Egypt, it would have been enough!

CHORUS: .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu!

אִלּוּ נָתַן לָֽנוּ אֶת־הַשַּׁבָּת , דַּיֵּנוּ

Ilu na-tan, na-tan la-nu, Na-tan la-nu et-ha-Sha-bat, Na-tan la-nu et-ha-Sha-bat, Da-ye-nu!
If he had given us Shabbat it would have been enough!

CHORUS: .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu!

אִלּוּ נָתַן לָֽנוּ אֶת־הַתּוֹרָה, דַּיֵּנוּ

Ilu na-tan, na-tan la-nu, Na-tan la-nu et-ha-To-rah, Na-tan la-nu et-ha-To-rah, Da-ye-nu!
If he had given us the Torah it would have been enough!

CHORUS: .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu!
.. .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Dai, da-ye-nu, .. Da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu!

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Rachtzah
Source : Traditional

רחצה

Rachtzah

Wash hands while reciting the traditional blessing for washing the hands:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְשָׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָּנוּ עַל נְטִילַת יָדַיִם.

Baruch atah Adonai Eloheinu melech ha-olam, asher kid'shanu b'mitzvotav, v'tzivanu al n'tilat yadayim.

Praised are you, Adonai, Lord our God, Ruler of the universe, who has taught us the way of holiness through commandments, commanding us to wash our hands.

Motzi-Matzah
Source : JewishBoston.com

The blessing over the meal and matzah | motzi matzah | מוֹצִיא מַצָּה

The familiar hamotzi blessing marks the formal start of the meal. Because we are using matzah instead of bread, we add a blessing celebrating this mitzvah.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, הַמּוֹצִיא לֶֽחֶם מִן הָאָֽרֶץ

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, hamotzi lechem min ha-aretz.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who brings bread from the land.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתַָיו וְצִוָּֽנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מַצָּה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat matzah.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to eat matzah.

Distribute and eat the top and middle matzah for everyone to eat.

Motzi-Matzah
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

We have now told the story of Passover…but wait! We’re not quite done. There are still some symbols on our seder plate we haven’t talked about yet. Rabban Gamliel would say that whoever didn’t explain the shank bone, matzah, and marror (or bitter herbs) hasn’t done Passover justice.

The shank bone represents the Pesach, the special lamb sacrifice made in the days of the Temple for the Passover holiday. It is called the pesach, from the Hebrew word meaning “to pass over,” because God passed over the houses of our ancestors in Egypt when visiting plagues upon our oppressors.

The matzah reminds us that when our ancestors were finally free to leave Egypt, there was no time to pack or prepare. Our ancestors grabbed whatever dough was made and set out on their journey, letting their dough bake into matzah as they fled.

The bitter herbs provide a visceral reminder of the bitterness of slavery, the life of hard labor our ancestors experienced in Egypt.

Motzi-Matzah
Source : Original

I'd like to add one more thought about the matzah. When the Israelites left Egypt, they decided to make bread. They did not  decide  to make matzah - they intended to make bread. However, the sun baked the flour and water they carried too quickly, turning it into flat, unleavened matzah.

The Israelites could have said, "We ruined our bread! It is garbage now! This is horrible!" Instead, they made do with what they had and moved forward. Now, matzah is one of the most central symbols of Pesach. It holds a great deal of meaning.

Often, I think, we can look what becomes as broken, incorrect, a deviation from our plan. But we can also look at it as our ancestors looked at their unleavened bread - a part of G-D's plan, a marker of a time that will make us stronger and perhaps wiser.

Maror
Source : www.bangitout.com
MarRoarr

 maror

Maror

Take a small amount of maror and a small amount of charoset together (but not so much charoset that the bitter taste of maror is neutralized). Recite the following blessing and eat them together:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָּנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מָרוֹר.

Baruch atah Adonai Eloheinu melech ha-olam, asher kid'shanu b'mitzvotav v'tzivanu al achilat maror.

Praised are you, Adonai, Lord our God, Ruler of the universe, who has made us holy with Your commandments, commanding us to eat the bitter herb.

Koreich
Source : National Center for Jewish Healing, A Personal Passover Journal for memory and Contemplation

Prepare sandwich of matza, maror, and charoset.

While we may understand that maturity means accepting that life is the integration of the bitter and the sweet, the sandwich also reminds us that we are live our lives "in-between". We hang in the balance, alive, but not immortal, sandwiched between a fragile, limited, animal self and our eternal Divine image.

Shulchan Oreich
Shulchan Oreich
Passover Headbanz Game

Now we will play a quick Passover version of the Headbanz Game. Each person will get a card with a topic/object/person/food about Passover. You can't look at your card. We will go in a circle and you will be given 30 seconds to ask as many questions as you can about the topic! If you can guess yours in time you get a prize!

Sample Questions to ask:

-Can I carry it? 

- Am I from the torah?

- Am I a food?

-Am I small/big?

Tzafun
Source : The Jewish Secular Community Passover Hagada

The Afikomen is the last piece of matza to be eaten at the Seder. It is part of the middle matza that has been hidden at the beginning of the Seder. The Afikomen must be eaten before the Seder can be completed. 

Traditionally, the children try to find it and are then in a good position to bargain with the leader to get it back. This symbolizes the right of children to be heard and to be involved in family decisions and of their importance in our future.

Although everyone will eat a last piece of matzah, the search for the afikomen will be different because of the number of children present.

Song: Hiney Mah Tov

Hiney mah tov
U-mah-na-tim
She-vet a-khim-gam-ya-khad

Behold how good and how pleasing for brothers (people) to sit together in unity.

Tzafun

11. Tzafun / Afikoman 

Indi please find the Afikomen!

✹✹✹

Go around prompt:

What are we hiding from ourselves?

 What would be possible if we allowed ourselves to find the truth?

Why is it important to finish the meal with “being found”?

✹✹✹

Tzafun
Source : http://articles.aish.com.s3.amazonaws.com/holidays/pesach/pass00_family_print_and_play_find_the_afikoman_maze_400x306.gif
afikoman time

Bareich

Pour the third cup of wine and recite Birkat Hamazon (Blessing after the Meal).

שִׁיר הַמַּעֲלוֹת:בְּשׁוּב יהוה אֶת־שִׁיבַת צִיּוֹן הָיִ֫ינוּ כְּחֹלְמִים. אָז יִמָּלֵא שְׂחוֹק פִּינוּ וּלְשׁוֹנֵנוּ רִנָּה, אָז יֹאמְרוּ בַגּוֹיִם, הִגְדִּיל יְיָ לַעֲשׂוֹת עִם אֵלֶּה. הִגְדִּיל יְיָ לַעֲשׂוֹת עִמָּנוּ, הָיִינוּ שְׂמֵחִים. שׁוּבָה יְיָ אֶת שְׁבִיתֵנוּ, כַּאֲפִיקִים בַּנֶּגֶב. הַזֹּרְעִים בְּדִמְעָה בְּרִנָּה יִקְצֹרוּ. הָלוֹךְ יֵלֵךְ וּבָכֹה נֹשֵׂא מֶשֶׁךְ הַזָּרַע, בֹּא יָבֹא בְרִנָּה נֹשֵׂא אֲלֻמֹּתָיו.

Shir Hama’alot, b’shuv Adonai et shee-vat Tzion, ha-yeenu k’chol meem. Az y’ma-lei s’chok pee-nu u’l-sho-nei-nu reena, az yo-m’ru va-goyim, heeg-deel Adonai la-asot eem eleh. Heeg-deel Adonai la-asot eemanu, ha-yee-nu s’mei-cheem. Shuva Adonai et sh’vee-tei-nu, ka-afee-keem ba-negev. Ha-zor-eem b’deem-ah b’reena yeek-tzo-ru. Ha-loch yei-lech u-va-cho no-sei me-shech hazara, bo yavo v’reena, no-sei alu-mo-tav.

When the Lord returns us from exile back to Zion, it will be as though in a dream. We will laugh and sing with joy. It shall be said around the world: “The Lord has done great things for them.” The Lord did great things for us, and we shall rejoice. God, restore our fortunes. We shall be like streams in the Negev. Those who sow in tears shall reap in joy. Though the farmer bears the measure of seed to the field in sadness, he shall come home with joy, bearing his sheaves.

Leader: רַבּוֹתַי נְבָרֵךְ. Rabotai n’vareich.

Participants: יְהִי שֵׁם יְיָ מְבֹרָךְ מֵעַתָּה וְעַד עוֹלָם. Y’hee sheim Adonai m’vo-rach mei-atah v’ad olam.

Leader: יְהִי שֵׁם יְיָ מְבֹרָךְ מֵעַתָּה וְעַד עוֹלָם. בִּרְשׁוּת מָרָנָן וְרַבָּנָן וְרַבּוֹתַי נְבָרֵך (אֱלֹהֵינוּ) שֶׁאָכַלְנוּ מִשֶּׁלוֹ.

Y’hee sheim Adonai m’vorach mei-atah v’ad olam. Beer-shut maranan v’rabanan v’rabotai, n’vareich (Eloheinu) she’achalnu mee-shelo.

Participants: בָּרוּךְ (אֱלֹהֵינוּ) שֶׁאָכַלְנוּ מִשֶּׁלוֹ וּבְטוּבוֹ חָיִּינוּ. Baruch (Eloheinu) she’achalnu mishelo uv’tuvo chayinu.

Leader: בָּרוּךְ (אֱלֹהֵינוּ) שֶׁאָכַלְנוּ מִשֶּׁלוֹ וּבְטוּבוֹ חָיִּינוּ. Baruch (Eloheinu) she’achalnu mishelo uv’tuvo chayinu.

All together: בָּרוּךְ הוּא וּבָרוּך שְׁמוֹ. Baruch hu u-varuch sh’mo.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, הַזָּן אֶת הָעוֹלָם כֻּלּוֹ בְּטוּבוֹ בְּחֵן בְּחֶסֶד וּבְרַחֲמִים הוּא נוֹתֵן לֶחֶם לְכָל בָּשָׂר, כִּי לְעוֹלָם חַסְדּוֹ. וּבְטוּבוֹ הַגָּדוֹל תָּמִיד לֹא חָסַר לָנוּ וְאַל יֶחְסַר לָנוּ מָזוֹן לְעוֹלָם וָעֶד. בַּעֲבוּר שְׁמוֹ הַגָּדוֹל כִּי הוּא אֵל זָן וּמְפַרְנֵס לַכֹּל וּמֵטִיב לַכֹּל וּמֵכִין מָזוֹן לְכָל בְּרִיּוֹתָיו אֲשֶׁר בָּרָא. בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, הַזָּן אֶת הַכֹּל.

Baruch atah Adonai, Eloheinu melech ha-olam, hazan et ha-olam kulo b’tuvo, b’chein b’chesed uv-rachamim, hu noten lechem l’chol basar, ki l’olam chasdo, uv-tuvo hagadol, tamid lo chasar lanu v’al yechsar lanu mazon l’olam va’ed. Ba-avur sh’mo hagadol, ki hu Eil zan um’farneis lakol, u-meitiv lakol u-meichin mazon l’chol-b’riyotav asher bara. Baruch atah Adonai, hazan et hakol.

Praised are you, Adonai, Lord our God, Ruler of the universe, who nourishes the whole world. Your kindness endures forever. May we never be in want of sustenance. God sustains us all, doing good to all, and providing food for all creation. Praised are you, Adonai, who sustains all.

נוֹדֶה לְךָ יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינוּ עַל שֶׁהִנְחַלְתָּ לַאֲבוֹתֵינוּ אֶרֶץ חֶמְדָּה טוֹבָה וּרְחָבָה, וְעַל שֶׁהוֹצֵאתָנוּ יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֵאֶרֶץ מִצְרַיִם וּפְדִיתָנוּ מִבֵּית עֲבָדִים, וְעַל בְּרִיתְךָ שֶׁחָתַמְתָּ בִּבְשָׂרֵנוּ, וְעַל תּוֹרָתְךָ שֶׁלִמַּדְתָּנוּ, וְעַל חֻקֶּיךָ שֶׁהוֹדַעְתָּנוּ, וְעַל חַיִּים חֵן וָחֶסֶד שֶׁחוֹנַנְתָּנוּ, וְעַל אֲכִילַת מָזוֹן שָׁאַתָּה זָן וּמְפַרְנֵס אוֹתָנוּ תָּמִיד בְּכָל יוֹם וּבְכָל עֵת וּבְכָל שָׁעָה.

We thank you, Adonai, Lord our God, for having given a beautiful, good, and spacious land; for having taken us out from the land of Egypt and redeemed us from the house of slavery; for Your covenant which You sealed in our flesh; for Your Torah which You taught us; for the life, grace and kindness You have granted us; and for the food with which You always sustain us.

וְעַל הַכֹּל יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינוּ אֲנַחְנוּ מוֹדִים לָךְ וּמְבָרְכִים אוֹתָךְ יִתְבָּרַךְ שִׁמְךָ בְּפִי כָל חַי תָּמִיד לְעוֹלָם וָעֶד. כַּכָּתוּב, וְאָכַלְתָּ וְשָׂבָעְתָּ וּבֵרַכְתָּ אֶת יְיָ אֱלֹהֶיךָ עַל הָאָרֶץ הַטֹּבָה אֲשֶׁר נָתַן לָךְ. בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, עַל הָאָרֶץ וְעַל הַמָּזוֹן.

​וּבְנֵה יְרוּשָׁלַיִם עִיר הַקֹּדֶשׁ בִּמְהֵרָה בְיָמֵינוּ. בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, בּוֹנֵה בְרַחֲמָיו יְרוּשָׁלָיִם. אָמֵן.

Uv’nei Y’rushalayim ir hakodesh bimheira v’yameinu. Baruch atah Adonai, boneh v’rachamav Y’rushalayim. Amein.

The Blessing after the Meal concludes by drinking the Third Cup of wine, while reclining to the left.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָפֶן.

Baruch atah Adonai, Eloheinu melech ha-olam, borei p'ri hagafen.

Praised are you, Adonai, Lord of the universe, who has created the fruit of the vine.

Hallel
Source : Compilation

In the years of wandering in the desert, Miriam's well accompanied the Israelites. Accodring to tradition, Miriam's well is still with us. Every Saturday night, at the end of Shabbat, its waters flow out into wells everywhere in the world.

While the return of Elijah is left to the future and all its potential, Miriam is present with us always. She and her waters sustain us as we await Elijah. She is here to provide healing, inspiration, and wisdom.

There is still a long journey to freedom, a long time before Elijah will herald the Messicanic age. Miriam calls is to work for -- not to passively wait for -- that day. She sustains us with the most basic substance on earth: water. She also lifts our hears as she leads us in song and dance. 

Elijah's cup remains untouched by us. But we now drink from Miriam's cup, the nurtuing waters of Miriam's well.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה ה' אֱ-לֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם שֶׁהַכֹּל נִהְיָה בִּדְבָרוֹ.

Barukh ata Adonai Eloheinu melekh ha’olam shehakol niyah bidvaro.

Praised are you, Eternal our God, Ruler of the Universe, by whose word all things are created.

 
ושאבתם מים בששון 
ממעייני הישועה. 
מים, מים, מים מים 
הוי מים בששון. 
 

Ushavtem mayim b'sason 
mimainei hayeshua .
Ushavtem mayim b'sason 
mimainei hayeshua 

Chorus: 
Mayim - Mayim - Mayim - Mayim 
Hey, mayim b'sason 
Mayim - Mayim - Mayim - Mayim
Hey, mayim b'sason 

Hey, hey, hey, hey 
Mayim - Mayim 
Mayim - Mayim
Mayim - Mayim - b'sason

Mayim - Mayim 
Mayim - Mayim
Mayim - Mayim - b'sason

Hallel

Tonight we welcome two prophets: not only Elijah, but also Miriam, sister of Moses. Elijah is a symbol of messianic redemption at the end of time; Miriam, of redemption in our present lives.

Please rise and sing as you are able as we open the doors of Hillel to welcome the prophets.

אֵלִיָּהוּ הַנָּבִיא אֵלִיָּהוּ הַתִשְׁבִּי

אֵלִיָּהוּ הַגִּלְעָדִי

במְהֵרָה בְיָמֵנוּ יָבוא אֵלֵינוּ

עִם מָשִׁיחַ בֶּן דָוִד, עִם מָשִׁיחַ בֶּן דָוִד

Eliyahu ha-navi, Eliyahu ha-Tishbi,

Eliyahu (3x) ha-Giladi.

Bimheirah v'yameinu, yavo ei-leinu

im Mashiach ben David (2x)

Elijah, the prophet; Elijiah, the Tishbite; Elijah, of Gilead! Come quickly in our days with the Messiah from the line of David.

Hallel

As we come to the end of the seder, we drink one more glass of wine. With this final cup, we give thanks for the experience of celebrating Passover together, for the traditions that help inform our daily lives and guide our actions and aspirations.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the fourth and final glass of wine! 

Conclusion
Source : Velveteen Rabbi

Counting the Omer                                                                ספירת העמר
(skip this on the first night - the Omer count begins on the second night)


“Omer” means “measures.” When the Temple stood, it was customary to bring harvest
offerings three times a year, at Sukkot, Pesach, and Shavuot. The tradition of Counting the
Omer dates to those days. We measured the seven weeks between planting new barley and
harvesting it; then offered a measure, in thanks, to our Source.

Now that few of us are barley farmers, and the Temple no longer stands, practices like
counting the Omer must take on new meaning. Shavuot is the anniversary of the day when we
accepted the teachings of Torah at Sinai a holiday to anticipate joyfully. We count the Omer
the way we count days to birthdays or vacations, eager for what’s coming.

Tonight we celebrate our freedom from slavery; in fifty days we will celebrate our acceptance
of the Torah’s teachings. Counting the Omer reminds us that we are freed not only from, but
also toward.


בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ רוּחַ הַעולָם,

Baruch atah, Adonai, eloheinu ruach ha’olam,

אָשֶר קִדשָנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָנוּ

asher kidshanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu

אַל סְפִירַת הַעמֶר.

al s’firat ha’omer.


Blessed are you, Adonai, Breath of Life, who sanctifies us with the commandment to count the
Omer.

הַיוֹם יוֹם אֶחַד לָעמֶר
Hayom yom echad la’omer! !

Today is the first day of the Omer!

Commentary / Readings
Personal Mitzrayim

We learn in Exodus 14:10-16 that only Joseph and Caleb of the enslaved Israelites made it to the land of Israel. Most of those enslaved could not break that enslavement. What does this mean for us, that we must not only take B'nei Yisrael out of Egypt, we must also take Egypt out of B'nei Yisrael? We have left Egypt, but are we really yet free of what enslaved us?

Songs
Source : Unknown

A Passover Song [Sung to the tune of "My favorite things"]

Cleaning and cooking and so many dishes, Out with the hametz, no pasta, no knishes

These are a few of our Passover things.

When the plagues strike, When the lice bite, When we're feeling sad

We simply remember our Passover things And then we don't feel so bad.

Matzoh and karpas and chopped up haroset, Shankbones and Kiddish and Yiddish neuroses, Tante who kvetches and uncle who sings, These are a few of our Passover things.

When the plagues strike, When the lice bite, When we're feeling sad

We simply remember our Passover things And then we don't feel so bad.

Motzi and maror and trouble with Pharoahs, Famines and locusts and slaves with wheelbarrows, Matzoh balls floating and eggshell that cling, These are a few of our Passover things.

When the plagues strike, When the lice bite, When we're feeling sad

We simply remember our Passover things And then we don't feel so bad.

Songs
Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses (to the tune of "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious")

Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses The story of the Passover our Seder meal discloses Reminds us that the life of slaves was not a bed of roses Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses

Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ai Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ai

The Jews were bound in Egypt and were feeling rather low So Moses went to Pharaoh and said “Let my people go.” Pharoah said “Be gone with you,” which wasn’t very nice So God commenced a run of plagues including frogs and lice.

Oh, Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses The story of the Passover our Seder meal discloses We will eat gefilte fish, though some will hold their noses Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses

Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ai Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ai

The plagues were unrelenting and included hail and boils Not to mention dreadful fates for Egypt's boys and goils. Pharaoh he surrendered, then with slightly soggy feet The Jews walked to their freedom and that’s it, come on, let’s eat!

Oh, Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses The story of the Passover our Seder meal discloses Finish the Haggadah before anybody dozes Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses

Songs
Source : www.bangitout.com

To the tune of Piano Man by Billy Joel

It's nine o'clock at the Seder Night 

The regular family members shuffle in 

There's an old man sitting next to me makin’ love to his Manishewitz yayin

He says, "Son, can you tell me bout the Exodus 

I'm not really sure how it goes

But it's sad and it's sweet and it’s got no leavened wheat 

so wake me up when we get to the matza hors’ devours 

la la la, di da da La la, di di da da yay nu

Sing us a song, it’s the Seder, man 

Sing us a song tonight 

Well, we're all in the mood for the Exodus 

And this First Cup got us all feelin' all right

Songs


Eight Days? A Week?
(to the tune of “Eight Days a Week”)
(Just how long is Passover, anyway?)


Ooh, I need my bread, babe Guess you know it’s true. How long must I wait, babe? What’s your point of view?


Bagels, challah! Bagels, challah! I ain’t got nothing but matzah Eight days? A week?


Some Jews say it’s seven. Some Jews say it’s eight. Just how long is Pesach? How long must I wait?


Bagels, challah! Bagels, challah! I ain’t got nothing but matzah Eight days? A week?

Eight days? A week? Of Peeeeeeeeeeeeesach.
Eight days? A week? It’s long enough to show we care.


Ooh, I need my bread, babe Guess you know it’s true. How long must I wait, babe? What’s your point of view?


Bagels, challah! Bagels, challah! I ain’t got nothing but matzah Eight days? A week?
© 2012 Barbara Sarshik and Leah Pike

Songs

To the tune of “Shake It Off” by Taylor Swift:

I stay up too late
Got 4 cups on my brain
That’s what people say, nuu-nuuu
That’s what people say, nuu-nuuu

I go on too many rants
But I can’t make any sense
At least that’s what people say, nuu nuuu
That’s what people say, nuu nuuu

But I keep leaning
Can’t stop, won’t stop eating
It’s like I got this freedom
In my mind
Singing, “Dayenu all night.”

‘Cause the seder’s on a plate, plate, plate, plate, plate
Mitzrim gonna hate, hate, hate, hate, hate
Marror, just gonna shake, shake, shake, shake, shake
I shake it off, Shake Marror off

Afikomen gonna break, break, break, break, break
And the matzahs gonna bake, bake, bake, bake, bake
Marror just gonna shake, shake, shake, shake, shake
I shake marror off, I shake it off

I never miss a step
Leaving Egypt was a Shlep
And that’s what they don’t see, mmm-mmm
That’s what they don’t see, mmm-mmm

I’m kiddushing on my own (kiddushing on my own)
I make the rules up as I go (rules up as I go)
And that’s what they don’t know, oy vey
That’s what they don’t know,oy vey

But I keep Leaning
Can’t stop, won’t stop dipping
It’s like I got this freedom
In my mind
Singing, “Dayenu, all night.”
‘Cause the seder’s on a plate, plate, plate, plate, plate
Mitzrim gonna hate, hate, hate, hate, hate
Marror, just gonna shake, shake, shake, shake, shake
I shake it off, I shake Marror off (Oy, Oy)
Afikomen gonna break, break, break, break, break
And the matzahs gonna bake, bake, bake, bake, bake
Marror just gonna shake, shake, shake, shake, shake
I shake marror off, I shake Marror off
Shake Marror off, I shake it off, (marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off,(marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off,(marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off(marror)

Hey, hey, hey
Just think while you’ve been leaning down and out about the Pharoah and the dirty, dirty plagues of the world,
You could’ve been getting down to this sick vort.

My afikoman lost by my new girlfriend
She’s like “Oh, my god!” but I’m just gonna break.
And to the fella over there with the Elijah good hair
Won’t you lean on over, baby? We can shake, shake, shake

Yeah ohhh

‘Cause the seder’s on a plate, plate, plate, plate, plate
Mitzrim gonna hate, hate, hate, hate, hate
Marror, just gonna shake, shake, shake, shake, shake
I shake it off, I shake it off (Oy, Oy)
Afikomen gonna break, break, break, break, break
And the matzahs gonna bake, bake, bake, bake, bake
Marror just gonna shake, shake, shake, shake, shake
I shake marror off, I shake it off (marror)

Shake Marror off, I shake it off,
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off, (marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off, (marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off (marror)

Shake Marror off, I shake it off,
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off,(marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off,(marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off(marror)

Shake Marror off, I shake it off,
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off (you’ve got to),
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off, (marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off(marror)

- See more at: http://www.bangitout.com/seder-songs-2015-shake-marror-off/#sthash.rN7RGqnI.dpuf

Songs

Sweet Kosher Wine to the tune of “Sweet Caroline” by Neil Diamond

Adonai said, “I never will forget you.

I will make Pharaoh set you free.”

Now here we are, drinking the wine we savor

As we recall our slavery.

(Chorus)

Hands…pouring wine,

Reaching out, red for me, white for you.

Sweet kosher wine,

You make seders seem so good

(so good, so good, so good)

We all recline

And we drink you like we should.

Adonai said, “If you can learn to trust me

Then in the end you’ll just be fine.”

Now here we are, all of these long years later

Drinking our favorite seder wine.

(Repeat chorus)

© 2012 Barbara Sarshik

Songs
Source : me

I Just Can’t Go to the King

to the tune of 

“I Just Can’t Wait To Be King”

(Moses)

I’m gonna see a mighty king. 

I’m feeling mighty scared.

(Aaron)

Well, Moses, I’ll be there with you 

So you’ll be well prepared.

(Moses)

I’ve never been too good with words. 

I stutter and I squeak. 

My hands are wet, my throat is dry 

Each time I try to speak.

(Aaron)

Well, Moses, don’t be scared about a thing.

(Moses)

Oh, I just can’t go to the king! 

I’ll be saying, “Do this.” 

I’ll be saying, “See them.” 

I’ll be saying, “Stop that.” 

I’ll be saying, “Free them. 

Free them all to leave today. 

Free them all to live God’s way.”

(Aaron)

The Pharaoh needs to know he needs to 

Have a change of heart. 

Or God will make his cows get sick 

And make the Red Sea part.

(Both)

The two of us will go tell Pharaoh, 

“Let my people go.” 

We know exactly what we’ll do if 

Pharaoh tells us no.

We’ll warn him of the plagues that God 

will bring. 

Oh, we’re both gonna go to the king!

We’ll be saying, “Do this.” 

We’ll be saying, “See them.” 

We’ll be saying, “Stop that.” 

We’ll be saying, “Free them.”

“Have respect for every living thing. 

Pharaoh, don’t be such a dingaling.” 

Now this will be our final time to sing: 

Oh, we’re both gonna go to the king!

Songs
Source : Frozen

Let Us Go

(sung loosely to the tune of Let it Go)

The sand burns hot in the desert tonight

The foot prints of my people can be seen

A kingdom of subjugation under Pharaoh who is mean

Our people built his temples and pyramids to the sky

Oh dear lord hear our people’s cry...

Let us go, let us go

Can’t hold us back any more

Let us go, let us go.

Find someone else to do your chores

Elohim, adoni hear us pray,

Lets pack our things

The desert never bothered us anyway

It’s funny how some distance

makes Egyptians all seems small and the masters that controlled us can’t get to us at all

It’s time to see what we can do

The power of a people who’ve broken through

Torah v emet the laws for me.

We’re free.

Let us go, let us go.

We are one with the lord

Let us go, let us go.

We hope this Seder didn’t make you bored

So here we’ll sit and here we’ll stay

Let the Seder go on

The Maror never bothers me anyway...

Songs

Disco Deliverance:
"We Will Survive - An In-Your-Face Passover Anthem"

Lyrics by Anna Morrison Markowitz
(Sung to the tune of Gloria Gaynor's "I Will Survive")

Moses:
First I was afraid -
I was petrified.
Kept thinking I'm just not a public speaking
kind of guy.
But then I spent too many nights
Seeing how you'd done them wrong,
And I grew strong.
Yes, I learned how to get along!

Pharoah:
So now you're here,
Back in my face.
You've brought us pestilence and famine,
Now I want you off my case!
I should have let your people go,
When the locusts ate our grain.
Now our firstborn have been taken,
And you've caused us so much pain!

Go on now, go!
Walk out the door.
Don't turn around now -
You're not welcome anymore.
Weren't you the ones to bite the hand
that held your pie?
Without me, you'll crumble -
You'll all lay down and die!

CHORUS:
No, we've got Chai -
We will survive!
As long as we trust in our G-d
We know we'll stay alive.
Our numbers will be countless
As the stars up in the sky.
Yes, we'll survive…
We will survive!

Moses:
It took all the strength we had,
Not to fall apart.
Now G-d has heard the weeping
Of our broken hearts.
You know we spent too many years
Sweating, hungry, and abused
We used to cry -
But now we hold our heads up high!

So now you'll see
Somebody new.
We're not that chained up little people
Once enslaved by you.
So if you decide to chase us,
Don't expect it to be free.
Our G-d will surely save us,
Guide us through the parted sea!

Pharoah:
Go on now, go!
Walk out the door.
Don't turn around now -
You're not welcome anymore.
Weren't you the ones to bite the hand
that held your pie?
Without me, you'll crumble
Yeah, you'll lay down and die!

CHORUS:
No, we've got Chai -
We will survive!
As long as we trust in our G-d
We know we'll stay alive.
Our numbers will be countless
As the stars up in the sky.
Yes, we'll survive…
We will survive!

Yeah, we've got Chai -
We will survive!
These miracles of freedom
G-d delivered long ago -
Still we tell our children,
So the story they will know.
We will survive!
We have survived!!!!
HEY, HEY!

- Anna Morrison Markowitz 2008
benannas4u@rochester.rr.com

 

Songs

The Ten Plagues
(sung to the tune of the "Adam's Family" theme song)

They're creepy and they're yucky
They're altogether ucky
They're so completley mucky
We're talking 'bout the Plagues.

The Nile turned to blood
Which was far worse than mud
Then frogs and lice and crud
The start of the Ten Plagues.

Next beasts, blight, and boils
On commoners and royals
Then hail and locusts spoiled
The country. It was wrecked.

Then Egypt drowned in darkness
The country was a big mess
All chaos, as you can guess
Pharaoh could not protect.

The last plague was the worst
The first-born sons were cursed
Their parent's hearts were burst
And Pharaoh let us go.

Each year we tell the story
Although this part is gory
It still speaks of God's glory
Remember the Ten Plagues.

Our cups are filled with wine
The joy with which we dine
Our joy is far less fine
When we remember the Ten Plagues.

Songs

Chad Gadyo
My father bought a lamb for Seder.
Chad gadyo, chad gadyo.
Chorus:
Ohhhhhhhhh (hold for as long or as loud as you can)
We sing it high we sing it low,
Chad Gad-ya-aaa
Chad Gad-ya
Then came the cat, which ate the lamb,
My father bought to serve for Seder.
Chad gadyo, chad gadyo.
Chorus:
Ohhhhhhhhh (hold for as long or as loud as you can)
We sing it loud, we sing it soft,
Chad Gad-ya-aaa
Chad Gad-ya
Then came the dog,
Which bit, bit, bit the cat, which ate up all the lamb,
My father bought to serve for Seder.
Chad gadyo, chad gadyo.
(repeat Chorus between each verse)
Then came the stick, which beat, beat, beat the dog,
Which bit, bit, bit the cat, which ate up all the lamb,
My father bought to serve for Seder.
Chad gadyo, chad gadyo.
Then came the fire,
Which burned the stick, which beat, beat, beat the dog,
Which bit, bit, bit the cat, which ate up all the lamb,
My father bought to serve for Seder.
Chad gadyo, chad gadyo.
Then came the water, which put out the fire,
Which burned the stick, which beat, beat, beat the dog,
Which bit, bit, bit the cat, which ate up all the lamb,
My father bought to serve for Seder.
Chad gadyo, chad gadyo.
Then came the ox,
Which drank the water, which put out the fire,
Which burned the stick, which beat, beat, beat the dog,
Which bit, bit, bit the cat, which ate up all the lamb,
My father bought to serve for Seder.
Chad gadyo, chad gadyo.
Then came the Shochet, who slaughtered the ox,
Which drank the water, which put out the fire,
Which burned the stick, which beat, beat, beat the dog,
Which bit, bit, bit the cat, which ate up all the lamb,
My father bought to serve for Seder.
Chad gadyo, chad gadyo.
Then came the angel of death,
Who killed the Shochet, who slaughtered the ox,
Which drank the water, which put out the fire,
Which burned the stick, which beat, beat, beat the dog,
Which bit, bit, bit the cat, which ate up all the lamb,
My father bought to serve for Seder.
Chad gadyo, chad gadyo.
Then came the Holy One, Blessed be She,
And slew the angel of death,
Who killed the Shochet, who slaughtered the ox,
Which drank the water, which put out the fire,
Which burned the stick, which beat, beat, beat the dog,
Which bit, bit, bit the cat, which ate up all the lamb,
My father bought to serve for Seder.
Chad gadyo, chad gadyo.
 

Elijah
(Sung to the tune of "Maria")
Elijah!
I just saw the prophet Elijah.
And suddenly that name,
Will never sound the same to me.
Elijah!
He came to our seder
Elijah!
He had his cup of wine,
But could not stay to dine
This year!
Elijah!
For your message all Jews are waiting:
That the time's come for peace
and not hating.
Elijah!
Next year we'll be waiting,
Elijah!
Unshipwrecked Exodus
(sung to the tune of Gilligan’s Island)
Recline right back and you’ll hear a tale, a tale of a fateful trip,
That started many years ago, in old ancient Egypt.
Such agony, such suffering, such anguish, such ordeal,
We celebrate the Exodus with a three hour meal, a three hour meal!
(KEY CHANGE!)
Found hundred years of slavery for countless toiling yids
And then at last, to top it off, we couldn’t have no kids—we couldn’t have
no kids.
The structural injustice in that ancient place was great
If not for the effort of the organizers, what would be our fate, oh what
would be our fate.
Shifrah and Pu-ah’s example gave the people hope to flee,
Blight and vermin, lice and darkness, helped the Pharaoh see…
(or at least agree)
(KEY CHANGE!)
Desire blazed within our hearts, a fiery burning bush,
We knew that we could make it, just like the folks from Cush…
Just a Tad of Charoset
(Sung to the tune of "Just a Spoonful of Sugar")
Oh, back in Egypt long ago,
The Jews were slaves under Pharaoh.
They sweat and toiled and labored through the day.
So when we gather Pesah night, We do what we think right.
Maror, we chew,
To feel what they went through.
Chorus:
Just a tad of charoset helps the bitter herbs go down,
The bitter herbs go down, the bitter herbs go down.
Just a tad of charoset helps the bitter herbs go down,
In the most disguising way.
So after years of slavery
They saw no chance of being free.
Their suffering was the only life they knew.
But baby Moses grew up tall,
And said he'd save them all.
He did, and yet,
We swear we won't forget that ...
Chorus
While the maror is being passed,
We all refill our water glass, Preparing
for the taste that turns us red.
Although maror seems full of minuses, It
sure does clear our sinuses.
But what's to do?
It's hard to be a Jew!!!
Chorus
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