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Introduction
Source : http://mochajuden.com/?p=4179, http://www.beliefnet.com/Faiths/Judaism/2009/03/Unique-Passover-Traditions.aspx?b=1&p=6

Jews from Spain, Italy, Sicily, Morocco, Tunisia, and Sardinia would bring the Seder plate to the table with ceremony. Sometimes, they would cover it with a nice scarf and sing as it arrived to the table. They would pass it from person to person around the table, and place it on each head for a moment. This demonstrates that we were once slaves in Egypt and carried heavy burdens on our heads. In Hungary, they go even further by decorating the Seder plate with gold and silver. They do this to remember how the Jews left Egypt with riches.

Kadesh
Source : Original
Kadesh

Urchatz
Source : Original
Urchatz

Urchatz
Source : http://mochajuden.com/?p=4179, http://www.beliefnet.com/Faiths/Judaism/2009/03/Unique-Passover-Traditions.aspx?p=2

The Jews of Ethiopia strongly identify with the story of Passover. In 1985, they had an exodus of their own, where they took almost 8,000 Jews from Sudan to Israel. They commemorate this by breaking all of their dished and making new ones. This symbolizes breaking from the past and starting over.

Some Ethiopian Jews have no Haggadahs so they read about the Pesach story directly from the Torah. They make their own matzahs from chickpea flour. On the morning of the seder, a lamb would be slaughtered. They also refrain from eating fermented dairy like yogurt, butter, or cheese.

Karpas
Source : Original
Karpas

Yachatz
Source : Original
Yachatz

Yachatz
Source : http://www.beliefnet.com/Faiths/Judaism/2009/03/Unique-Passover-Traditions.aspx?b=1&p=8

In Syria, instead of breaking the middle matzah in half, they break it into the shape of the Hebrew letters daled and vav, which correspond to numbers adding up to 10, representing the 10 Holy Emanations of G-d.

Maggid - Beginning
Source : Original
Maggid

Maggid - Beginning
Source : http://www.foxnews.com/travel/2015/03/31/passover-traditions-around-world.html

During Maggid, Syrian Jews throw sacks of matzah over their shoulders and say a special verse in Hebrew about leaving the Egypt in haste.

Maggid - Beginning
Source : http://www.foxnews.com/travel/2015/03/31/passover-traditions-around-world.html

In Yemen, instead of spilling ten drops of wine from their cups when the 10 plagues are mentioned, they pour 10 drops from one glass to another and throw that glass into the garden to cast away the plague.

Maggid - Beginning
Source : http://www.parksleepfly.com/blog/passover-traditions-around-the-world/

In Spain, the first-born sons eat a roasted egg to show appreciation for being spared during the 10th plague.

Maggid - Beginning
Source : http://mochajuden.com/?p=4179, http://www.beliefnet.com/Faiths/Judaism/2009/03/Unique-Passover-Traditions.aspx?p=2

Persian and Afghan Jews lightly hit each other with scallions during Dayenu to symbolize the slaves being whipped by the Egyptians.

Rachtzah
Source : Original
Rachtzah

Motzi-Matzah
Source : Original
Motzi Matzah

Maror
Source : Original
Maror

Maror
Source : http://www.beliefnet.com/Faiths/Judaism/2009/03/Unique-Passover-Traditions.aspx?p=2, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/04/08/to

In Cuba, Jews are poor and can't access all of the fruits needed to make Charoset, so they use matzah, honey, cinnamon, and wine instead. In Gibraltar, a British overseas territory on the coast of Spain, they put brick dust in Charoset to resemble the mortar used during slavery. In India, Charoset contains raisins, dates, and sesame paste. In Spain, they put dates, apricots, pistachios, pine nuts, and coconuts in the Charoset.

Koreich
Source : Original
Korech

Koreich
Source : http://mochajuden.com/?p=4179, http://www.beliefnet.com/Faiths/Judaism/2009/03/Unique-Passover-Traditions.aspx?b=1&p=9

A Jewish community that has lived in Kochi, India for more than 2,000 years starts preparing for Passover right after Hanukkah. They believe that if a Jewish woman were to make even the slightest mistake in Passover preparation during the 100 days before the actual seder, then the lives of her husband and her children would be endangered. They keep special rooms that hold all of the Passover utensils. Houses would be scraped and immediately repainted after Purim. Wells would be drained and scrubbed. Each grain of rice they’d eat on Passover would be examined to make sure it was free from cracks into which chametz might find its way.

Shulchan Oreich
Tzafun
Source : Original
Tzafun

Bareich
Source : Original
Barech

Bareich
Source : http://www.beliefnet.com/Faiths/Judaism/2009/03/Unique-Passover-Traditions.aspx?b=1&p=9

Jews in Morocco set up nice chair with cushions and ornaments for Elijah.

Hallel
Source : Original
Hallel

Hallel
Source : http://articles.sun-sentinel.com/1987-04-10/features/8701230349_1_passover-matzoh-jewish-communities

In Libya, before Passover, women would grind flour for matzah for 7 days while the men took chalk from the mountains to make whitewash. Then, they would paint their houses inside and out. Until the Seder, everyone slept outside.

Nirtzah
Source : Original
Nirtzah

Nirtzah
Source : http://mochajuden.com/?p=4179, http://www.beliefnet.com/Faiths/Judaism/2009/03/Unique-Passover-Traditions.aspx?p=2

Chasidic Jews from Góra Kalwaria, Poland re-enact the crossing of the Red Sea on the 7th day of Passover by pouring water on the floor and naming the towns that they would cross in their region of Poland. They raise a glass at each "town" and then thank G-d for helping them reach their destination.

Nirtzah
Source : http://mochajuden.com/?p=4179, http://www.beliefnet.com/Faiths/Judaism/2009/03/Unique-Passover-Traditions.aspx?b=1&p=13

In Morocco, Mimouna, a traditional North African Jewish celebration is celebrated the day after Passover. This celebration marks returning to eating chametz. They celebrate with baked foods and foods that symbolize luck because Mimouna is the Arabic word for luck. Such foods include dough with hand prints of silver coins. At the conclusion of this celebration, they enter the ocean and throw pebbles behind their backs to ward off evil spirits.

Nirtzah
Source : http://www.rahelsjewishindia.com/page5/page22/page22.html

After the Seder, Turkish Jews would have the father throw grass, coins, and candy for children to collect. This is a symbol of the wealth the Jews brought out of Egypt. The grass represents the reeds of the Red Sea and a wish that the year ahead should be "green" and productive. Some families take parsley (a sign of Spring) and recite a verse in Arabic. With each word, they cross the parsley in their hands from one shoulder to the other of the person they are facing. Then, they bless them to have a good year and do this until everyone has blessed everyone.

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