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Kadesh
Source : Original
•Reader:  In Exodus, there are a lot of laws that pertain differently to natives, or “ezrah” and sojourners, or “ger.”  The word “ezrah” is literally a kind of plant, probably a grapevine.  Metaphorically, it means something like “nurtured by the soil.”  The fact that native Israelites are referred to as “grapevines” says a lot about the importance of grapes and wine in our culture. •Questioner: Why are we obligated to drink four cups of wine?

•Reader: There are many reasons proposed. Here are the ones from the Hagaddah and from three different Jewish sages

•Reader:  The Hagaddah says:  With each cup, we recall the four different promises of freedom that God gave our people:  “I will free you from the burdens of the Egyptians,” “I will deliver you from their bondage,” “I will redeem you with an outstretched arm,” and “I will take you to be my people.” •Reader:  The Vilna Gaon says: They relate to the four worlds: this world, the messianic age, the world at the time of the revival of the dead, and the world to come. •Reader: The Maharal says: They refer to the four matriarchs, Sarah, Rebecca, Rachel, and Leah •Reader: The Abarbanel says: They refer to the four redemptions of the Jewish people: the choosing of Abraham, the Exodus from Egypt, survival during the Diaspora, and the final redemption to come. •Questioner:  What other reasons are there? (discussion)   Red or White?  

•Reader:  Traditionally, Ashkenazi Jews drank white wine at the Seder, while Sephardic Jews drank red wine. 

•Reader:  During the Middle Ages,  Jews in Christian countries were accused of drinking human blood at the Seder (the “blood libel”).  To avoid even the appearance of this, Ashkenazi Jews switched to white wine.   Kiddush  

•Reader:  You have called us for service from among the peoples, and have hallowed our lives with commandments. In love you have given us festivals for rejoicing, seasons of celebration, this Festival of Matzah, the time of our freedom, a commemoration of the Exodus from Egypt. Praised are you, Adonai, who gave us this joyful heritage.

•Everyone: Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu Meleh ha-olam borei p’ri ha-gafen •Reader: We praise You, O God, Sovereign of Existence, Who creates the fruit of the vine.    
Kadesh
Source : (Traditional)

   On Shabbat begin here, and include the portions in parentheses

וַיְהִי עֶרֶב וַיְהִי בֹקֶר יוֹם הַשִּׁשִּׁי. וַיְכֻלּוּ הַשָׁמַיִם וְהָאָרֶץ וְכָל צְבָאַָם. וַיְכַל אֱלֹקִים בַּיוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי מְלַאכְתּוֹ אֲשֶׁר עָשָׂה וַיִּשְׁבֹּת בַּיוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי מִכָּל מְלַאכְתּוֹ אֲשֶׁר עָשָׂה. וַיְבָרֶךְ אֱלֹהִים אֶת יוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי וַיְקַדֵּשׁ אוֹתוֹ כִּי בוֹ שָׁבַת מִכָּל מְלַאכְתּוֹ אֲשֶׁר בֶָּרָא אֱלֹהִים לַעֲשׂוֹת.)

סַבְרִי מָרָנָן וְרַבָּנָן וְרַבּוֹתַי

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָפֶן.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר בָּחַר בָּנוּ מִכָּל עָם וְרוֹמְמָנוּ מִכָּל לָשׁוֹן וְקִדְּשָׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו. וַתִּתֶּן לָנוּ יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ בְּאַהֲבָה (שַׁבָּתוֹת לִמְנוּחָה וּ) מוֹעֲדִים לְשִׂמְחָה, חַגִּים וּזְמַנִּים לְשָׂשׂוֹן, אֶת יוֹם (הַשַׁבָּת הַזֶה וְאֶת יוֹם) חַג הַמַצוֹת הַזֶה, זְמַן חֵרוּתֵנוּ (בְּאַהֲבָה), מִקְרָא קֹדֶשׁ, זֵכֶר לִיצִיאַת מִצְרָיִם. כִּי בָנוּ בָחַרְתָּ וְאוֹתָנוּ קִדַּשְׁתָּ מִכָּל הָעַמִּים, (וְשַׁבָּת) וּמוֹעֲדֵי קָדְשֶךָ (בְּאַהֲבָה וּבְרָצוֹן,) בְּשִׂמְחָה וּבְשָׂשׂוֹן הִנְחַלְתָּנוּ. בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי, מְקַדֵּשׁ (הַשַׁבָּת וְ) יִשְׂרָאֵל וְהַזְּמַנִּים.

On Saturday night include

[בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא מְאוֹרֵי הָאֵשׁ. בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם הַמַבְדִיל בֵּין קֹדֶשׁ לְחֹל, ין אוֹר לְחשֶׁךְ, בֵּין יִשְׂרָאֵל לָעַמִּים, בֵּין יוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי לְשֵׁשֶׁת יְמֵי הַמַּעֲשֶׂה. בֵּין קְדֻשַּׁת שַׁבָּת לִקְדֻשַּׁת יוֹם טוֹב הִבְדַּלְתָּ, וְאֶת יוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי מִשֵּׁשֶׁת יְמֵי הַמַּעֲשֶׂה קִדַּשְׁתָּ. הִבְדַּלְתָּ וְקִדַּשְׁתָּ אֶת עַמְּךָ יִשְׂרָאֵל בִּקְדֻשָּׁתֶךָ. ,בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי הַמַּבְדִיל בֵּין קֹדֶשׁ לְקֹדֶשׁ.]

Urchatz
Source : A Growing Haggadah

Why do we wash our hands all the time?

This washing, even though it is an official task of the Seder, is done without a blessing. It is strictly for cleanliness purposes.

And why not?

We're about to handle food. It seems so easy for us. We turn on the tap, and there it is. But water is scarce. May we be aware of our water as we continue the Seder.

Karpas
by Debra
Source : Telling the Story: A Passover Haggadah Explained

In ancient times our people were farmers and shepherds. In this festive season, we are meant to feel a connection with the food we eat from the land and to remember that we are surrounded by blessings and miracles no less majestic than those our ancestors witnessed thousands of years ago. Spring reminds us that we are again given a chance for renewal; a new chance to create peace and goodness in our world. We dip karpas - greens - to symbolize this renewal. The salt water symbolizes the bitter tears shed by our ancestors in slavery

Each person takes greens, dips them in salt water and recites the following:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הָאֲדָמָה                                                     

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p'ri ha-adamah.

We praise You, Adonai, Sovereign of Life, Who creates the fruit of the earth.

Eat the Karpas.

Karpas
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

Passover, like many of our holidays, combines the celebration of an event from our Jewish memory with a recognition of the cycles of nature. As we remember the liberation from Egypt, we also recognize the stirrings of spring and rebirth happening in the world around us. The symbols on our table bring together elements of both kinds of celebration.

We now take a vegetable, representing our joy at the dawning of spring after our long, cold winter. Most families use a green vegetable, such as parsley or celery, but some families from Eastern Europe have a tradition of using a boiled potato since greens were hard to come by at Passover time. Whatever symbol of spring and sustenance we’re using, we now dip it into salt water, a symbol of the tears our ancestors shed as slaves. Before we eat it, we recite a short blessing:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הָאֲדָמָה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree ha-adama.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruits of the earth.

We look forward to spring and the reawakening of flowers and greenery. They haven’t been lost, just buried beneath the snow, getting ready for reappearance just when we most needed them.

-

We all have aspects of ourselves that sometimes get buried under the stresses of our busy lives. What has this winter taught us? What elements of our own lives do we hope to revive this spring?

Yachatz
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

There are three pieces of matzah stacked on the table. We now break the middle matzah into two pieces. The host should wrap up the larger of the pieces and, at some point between now and the end of dinner, hide it. This piece is called the afikomen, literally “dessert” in Greek. After dinner, the guests will have to hunt for the afikomen in order to wrap up the meal… and win a prize.

We eat matzah in memory of the quick flight of our ancestors from Egypt. As slaves, they had faced many false starts before finally being let go. So when the word of their freedom came, they took whatever dough they had and ran with it before it had the chance to rise, leaving it looking something like matzah.

Uncover and hold up the three pieces of matzah and say:

This is the bread of poverty which our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt. All who are hungry, come and eat; all who are needy, come and celebrate Passover with us. This year we are here; next year we will be in Israel. This year we are slaves; next year we will be free.

These days, matzah is a special food and we look forward to eating it on Passover. Imagine eating only matzah, or being one of the countless people around the world who don’t have enough to eat.

What does the symbol of matzah say to us about oppression in the world, both people literally enslaved and the many ways in which each of us is held down by forces beyond our control? How does this resonate with events happening now?

Maggid - Beginning
Source : (Traditional)

הָא לַחְמָא עַנְיָא דִי אֲכָלוּ אַבְהָתָנָא בְּאַרְעָא דְמִצְרָיִם. כָּל דִכְפִין יֵיתֵי וְיֵיכֹל, כָּל דִצְרִיךְ יֵיתֵי וְיִפְסַח. הָשַׁתָּא הָכָא, לְשָׁנָה הַבָּאָה בְּאַרְעָא דְיִשְׂרָאֵל. הָשַׁתָּא עַבְדֵי, לְשָׁנָה הַבָּאָה בְּנֵי חוֹרִין.

Maggid - Beginning
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

בְּכָל־דּוֹר וָדוֹר חַיָּב אָדָם לִרְאוֹת אֶת־עַצְמוֹ, כְּאִלּוּ הוּא יָצָא מִמִּצְרָֽיִם

B’chol dor vador chayav adam lirot et-atzmo, k’ilu hu yatzav mimitzrayim.

In every generation, everyone is obligated to see themselves as though they personally left Egypt.

The seder reminds us that it was not only our ancestors whom God redeemed; God redeemed us too along with them. That’s why the Torah says “God brought us out from there in order to lead us to and give us the land promised to our ancestors.”

---

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who redeemed us and our ancestors from Egypt, enabling us to reach this night and eat matzah and bitter herbs. May we continue to reach future holidays in peace and happiness.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the second glass of wine!

Maggid - Beginning
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

Pour the second glass of wine for everyone.

The Haggadah doesn’t tell the story of Passover in a linear fashion. We don’t hear of Moses being found by the daughter of Pharaoh – actually, we don’t hear much of Moses at all. Instead, we get an impressionistic collection of songs, images, and stories of both the Exodus from Egypt and from Passover celebrations through the centuries. Some say that minimizing the role of Moses keeps us focused on the miracles God performed for us. Others insist that we keep the focus on the role that every member of the community has in bringing about positive change.

Maggid - Beginning
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

As all good term papers do, we start with the main idea:

ּעֲבָדִים הָיִינוּ הָיִינו. עַתָּה בְּנֵי חוֹרִין  

Avadim hayinu hayinu. Ata b’nei chorin.

We were slaves to Pharaoh in Egypt. Now we are free.

We were slaves to Pharaoh in Egypt, and God took us from there with a strong hand and outstretched arm. Had God not brought our ancestors out of Egypt, then even today we and our children and our grandchildren would still be slaves. Even if we were all wise, knowledgeable scholars and Torah experts, we would still be obligated to tell the story of the exodus from Egypt.

Maggid - Beginning
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

The plagues and our subsequent redemption from Egypt are but one example of the care God has shown for us in our history. Had God but done any one of these kindnesses, it would have been enough – dayeinu.

אִלּוּ הוֹצִיאָֽנוּ מִמִּצְרַֽיִם, דַּיֵּנוּ

Ilu hotzi- hotzianu, Hotzianu mi-mitzrayim Hotzianu mi-mitzrayim, Dayeinu

If God had only taken us out of Egypt, that would have been enough!

אִלּוּ נָתַן לָֽנוּ אֶת־הַתּוֹרָה, דַּיֵּנוּ

Ilu natan natan lanu, natan lanu et ha-Torah, Natan lanu et ha-Torah , Dayeinu

If God had only given us the Torah, that would have been enough.

 The complete lyrics to Dayeinu tell the entire story of the Exodus from Egypt as a series of miracles God performed for us. (See the Additional Readings if you want to read or sing them all.)

Dayeinu also reminds us that each of our lives is the cumulative result of many blessings, small and large. 

-- Four Questions
Source : JewishBoston.com

The formal telling of the story of Passover is framed as a discussion with lots of questions and answers. The tradition that the youngest person asks the questions reflects the centrality of involving everyone in the seder. The rabbis who created the set format for the seder gave us the Four Questions to help break the ice in case no one had their own questions. Asking questions is a core tradition in Jewish life. If everyone at your seder is around the same age, perhaps the person with the least seder experience can ask them – or everyone can sing them all together.

מַה נִּשְׁתַּנָּה הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה מִכָּל הַלֵּילות

Ma nishtana halaila hazeh mikol haleilot?

Why is this night different from all other nights?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכלין חָמֵץ וּמַצָּה  הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה כֻּלּוֹ מצה  

Shebichol haleilot anu ochlin chameitz u-matzah. Halaila hazeh kulo matzah.

On all other nights we eat both leavened bread and matzah.
Tonight we only eat matzah.

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכְלִין שְׁאָר יְרָקוֹת הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה מָרוֹר

Shebichol haleilot anu ochlin shi’ar yirakot haleila hazeh maror.

On all other nights we eat all kinds of vegetables,
but tonight we eat bitter herbs.

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אֵין אָֽנוּ מַטְבִּילִין אֲפִילוּ פַּֽעַם אחָת  הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה שְׁתֵּי פְעמים

Shebichol haleilot ain anu matbilin afilu pa-am echat. Halaila hazeh shtei fi-amim.

On all other nights we aren’t expected to dip our vegetables one time.
Tonight we do it twice.

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכְלִין בֵּין יוֹשְׁבִין וּבֵין מְסֻבִּין.  :הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה כֻּלָּֽנוּ מְסֻבין

Shebichol haleilot anu ochlin bein yoshvin uvein m’subin. Halaila hazeh kulanu m’subin.

On all other nights we eat either sitting normally or reclining.
Tonight we recline.

-- Four Children
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

As we tell the story, we think about it from all angles. Our tradition speaks of four different types of children who might react differently to the Passover seder. It is our job to make our story accessible to all the members of our community, so we think about how we might best reach each type of child:

What does the wise child say?

The wise child asks, What are the testimonies and laws which God commanded you?

You must teach this child the rules of observing the holiday of Passover.

What does the wicked child say?

The wicked child asks, What does this service mean to you?

To you and not to himself! Because he takes himself out of the community and misses the point, set this child’s teeth on edge and say to him: “It is because of what God did for me in taking me out of Egypt.” Me, not him. Had that child been there, he would have been left behind.

What does the simple child say?

The simple child asks, What is this?

To this child, answer plainly: “With a strong hand God took us out of Egypt, where we were slaves.”

What about the child who doesn’t know how to ask a question?

Help this child ask.

Start telling the story:

“It is because of what God did for me in taking me out of Egypt.”

-

Do you see yourself in any of these children? At times we all approach different situations like each of these children. How do we relate to each of them?

-- Ten Plagues
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

As we rejoice at our deliverance from slavery, we acknowledge that our freedom was hard-earned. We regret that our freedom came at the cost of the Egyptians’ suffering, for we are all human beings made in the image of God. We pour out a drop of wine for each of the plagues as we recite them.

Dip a finger or a spoon into your wine glass for a drop for each plague.

These are the ten plagues which God brought down on the Egyptians:

Blood | dam | דָּם

Frogs | tzfardeiya |  צְפַרְדֵּֽעַ

Lice | kinim | כִּנִּים

Beasts | arov | עָרוֹב

Cattle disease | dever | דֶּֽבֶר

Boils | sh’chin | שְׁחִין

Hail | barad | בָּרָד

Locusts | arbeh | אַרְבֶּה

Darkness | choshech | חֹֽשֶׁךְ

Death of the Firstborn | makat b’chorot | מַכַּת בְּכוֹרוֹת

The Egyptians needed ten plagues because after each one they were able to come up with excuses and explanations rather than change their behavior. Could we be making the same mistakes? Make up your own list. What are the plagues in your life? What are the plagues in our world today? What behaviors do we need to change to fix them? 

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Original

We are required to mention the three symbols of Pesach.

The Roasted Shankbone is a reminder for us that we placed lambs blood on the doors of our homes so that G-d would pass over "posach" our homes  when we were slaves in Egypt.  He then killed the first born sons of the Egyptians as the tenth plague.

Matzoh is the flat, unleavened bread which we ate when ran from Egypt in a hurry.  There was no time to wait for the dough to rise.

Moror- Bitter Herbs are to remind us that the Egyptians embittered our lives by making us slaves in Egypt. 

Other symbols are the roasted egg, to remind us of when we would make a sacrifice to the priests at the Temple.  It also serves to remind us that we, the Jewish faith, are strong and adversity makes us even stronger.

The orange at the table is fairly new.  It is a reminder to all that women actually did and do play a part in Judiasm, not just table setting and cooking.

Rachtzah
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

As we now transition from the formal telling of the Passover story to the celebratory meal, we once again wash our hands to prepare ourselves. In Judaism, a good meal together with friends and family is itself a sacred act, so we prepare for it just as we prepared for our holiday ritual, recalling the way ancient priests once prepared for service in the Temple.

Some people distinguish between washing to prepare for prayer and washing to prepare for food by changing the way they pour water on their hands. For washing before food, pour water three times on your right hand and then three times on your left hand.

After you have poured the water over your hands, recite this short blessing.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו, וְצִוָּנוּ  עַל נְטִילַת יָדָֽיִם

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al n’tilat yadayim.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to wash our hands.

Motzi-Matzah
Source : JewishBoston.com

The blessing over the meal and matzah | motzi matzah | מוֹצִיא מַצָּה

The familiar hamotzi blessing marks the formal start of the meal. Because we are using matzah instead of bread, we add a blessing celebrating this mitzvah.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, הַמּוֹצִיא לֶֽחֶם מִן הָאָֽרֶץ

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, hamotzi lechem min ha-aretz.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who brings bread from the land.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתַָיו וְצִוָּֽנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מַצָּה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat matzah.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to eat matzah.

Distribute and eat the top and middle matzah for everyone to eat.

Maror
Source : JewishBoston.com

Dipping the bitter herb in sweet charoset | maror  |מָרוֹר   

  In creating a holiday about the joy of freedom, we turn the story of our bitter history into a sweet celebration. We recognize this by dipping our bitter herbs into the sweet charoset. We don’t totally eradicate the taste of the bitter with the taste of the sweet… but doesn’t the sweet mean more when it’s layered over the bitterness?

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָּֽנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מרוֹר

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat maror.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to eat bitter herbs.

Koreich
Source : JewishBoston.com

Eating a sandwich of matzah and bitter herb | koreich | כּוֹרֵךְ

When the Temple stood in Jerusalem, the biggest ritual of them all was eating the lamb offered as the pesach or Passover sacrifice. The great sage Hillel would put the meat in a sandwich made of matzah, along with some of the bitter herbs. While we do not make sacrifices any more – and, in fact, some Jews have a custom of purposely avoiding lamb during the seder so that it is not mistaken as a sacrifice – we honor this custom by eating a sandwich of the remaining matzah and bitter herbs. Some people will also include charoset in the sandwich to remind us that God’s kindness helped relieve the bitterness of slavery.

Shulchan Oreich
Source : JewishBoston.com

Eating the meal! | shulchan oreich | שֻׁלְחָן עוֹרֵךְ

Enjoy! But don’t forget when you’re done we’ve got a little more seder to go, including the final two cups of wine!

Tzafun
Source : JewishBoston.com

Finding and eating the Afikomen | tzafoon | צָפוּן

The playfulness of finding the afikomen reminds us that we balance our solemn memories of slavery with a joyous celebration of freedom. As we eat the afikomen, our last taste of matzah for the evening, we are grateful for moments of silliness and happiness in our lives.

Bareich
Source : Unknown

שִיר הַמַעֲלוֹת, בְשוב יְיָ אֶת שִיבַת צִיוֹן, הָיִינו כְחלְֹמִים. אָז יִמָלֵא שְחוֹק פִינו ולְשוֹנֵנו רִנָה, אָז יאֹמְרו בַגוֹיִם, הִגְדִיל יְיָ לַעֲשוֹת עִם אֵלֶה. הִגְדִיל יְיָ לַעֲשוֹת עִמָנו, הָיִינו שְמֵחִים. שובָה יְיָ אֶת שְבִיתֵנו, כַאֲפִיקִים בַנֶגֶב. הַזרְֹעִים בְדִמְעָה
בְרִנָה יִקְצרֹו. הָלוֹךְ יֵלֵךְ ובָכהֹ נשֵֹא מֶשֶךְ הַזָרַע, באֹ יָבאֹ בְרִנָה נשֵֹא אֲלֻמתָֹיו
תְהִלַת יְיָ יְדַבֶר פִי, וִיבָרֵךְ כָל בָשָר שֵם קָדְשוֹ לְעוֹלָם וָעֶד. וַאֲנַחְנו נְבָרֵךְ יָה מֵעַתָה וְעַד עוֹלָם הַלְלויָה. הוֹדו לַייָ כִי טוֹב כִי לְעוֹלָם חַסְדוֹ. מִי יְמַלֵל גְבורוֹת יְיָ
יַשְמִיעַ כָל תְהִלָתוֹ.

Include parenthesis when there is a minyan present


Leader


רַבוֹתַי נְבָרֵךְ.


Participants


יְהִי שֵם יְיָ מְברָֹךְ מֵעַתָה וְעַד עוֹלָם.


Leader


יְהִי שֵם יְיָ מְברָֹךְ מֵעַתָה וְעַד עוֹלָם. בִרְשות מָרָנָן וְרַבָנָן וְרַבוֹתַי נְבָרֵך (אֱלֹהֵינו) שֶאָכַלְנו מִשֶלוֹ.

Participants


בָרוךְ (אֱלֹהֵינו) שֶאָכַלְנו מִשֶלוֹ ובְטובוֹ חָיִינו.

Leader


בָרוךְ )אֱלֹהֵינו( שֶאָכַלְנו מִשֶלוֹ ובְטובוֹ חָיִינו.


All together


בָרוךְ הוא ובָרוך שְמוֹ.

בָרוךְ אַתָה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינו מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, הַזָן אֶת הָעוֹלָם כֻלוֹ בְטובוֹ בְחֵן בְחֶסֶד ובְרַחֲמִים הוא נוֹתֵן לֶחֶם לְכָל בָשָר, כִי לְעוֹלָם חַסְדוֹ. ובְטובוֹ הַגָדוֹל תָמִיד לֹא חָסַר לָנו וְאַל יֶחְסַר לָנו מָזוֹן לְעוֹלָם וָעֶד. בַעֲבור שְמוֹ הַגָדוֹל כִי הוא אֵל זָן ומְפַרְנֵס לַכלֹ ומֵטִיב לַכלֹ ומֵכִין מָזוֹן לְכָל בְרִיוֹתָיו אֲשֶר בָרָא. בָרוךְ אַתָה יְיָ, הַזָן אֶת הַכלֹ.
נוֹדֶה לְךָ יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינו עַל שֶהִנְחַלְתָ לַאֲבוֹתֵינו אֶרֶץ חֶמְדָה טוֹבָה ורְחָבָה, וְעַל שֶהוֹצֵאתָנו יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינו מֵאֶרֶץ מִצְרַיִם ופְדִיתָנו מִבֵית עֲבָדִים, וְעַל בְרִיתְךָ שֶחָתַמְתָ בִבְשָרֵנו, וְעַל תוֹרָתְךָ שֶלִמַדְתָנו, וְעַל חֻקֶיךָ שֶהוֹדַעְתָנו, וְעַל חַיִים חֵן וָחֶסֶד שֶחוֹנַנְתָנו, וְעַל אֲכִילַת מָזוֹן שָאַתָה זָן ומְפַרְנֵס אוֹתָנו תָמִיד בְכָל יוֹם ובְכָל עֵת ובְכָל שָעָה.
וְעַל הַכלֹ יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינו אֲנַחְנו מוֹדִים לָךְ ומְבָרְכִים אוֹתָךְ יִתְבָרַךְ שִמְךָ בְפִי כָל חַי תָמִיד לְעוֹלָם וָעֶד. כַכָתוב, וְאָכַלְתָ וְשָבָעְתָ ובֵרַכְתָ אֶת יְיָ אֱלֹהֶיךָ עַל הָאָרֶץ הַטבָֹה אֲשֶר נָתַן לָךְ. בָרוךְ אַתָה יְיָ, עַל הָאָרֶץ וְעַל הַמָזוֹן.
רחֶַם נָא יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינו עַל יִשְרָאֵל עַמֶךָ וְעַל יְרושָלַיִם עִירֶךָ וְעַל צִיוֹן מִשְכַן כְבוֹדֶךָ וְעַל מַלְכות בֵית דָוִד מְשִיחֶךָ וְעַל הַבַיִת הַגָדוֹל וְהַקָדוֹש שֶנִקְרָא שִמְךָ עָלָיו. אֱלֹהֵינו אָבִינו רְעֵנו זונֵנו פַרְנְסֵנו וְכַלְכְלֵנו וְהַרְוִיחֵנו וְהַרְוַח לָנו יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינו מְהֵרָה מִכָל צָרוֹתֵינו. וְנָא אַל תַצְרִיכֵנו יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינו לֹא לִידֵי מַתְנַת בָשָר וָדָם וְלֹא לִידֵי הַלְוָאָתָם, כִי אִם לְיָדְךָ הַמְלֵאָה הַפְתוחָה הַקְדוֹשָה וְהָרְחָבָה, שֶלא נֵבוֹש וְלֹא נִכָלֵם לְעוֹלָם וָעֶד.


On Shabbat


רְצהֵ וְהַחֲלִיצֵנו יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינו בְמִצְוֹתֶיךָ ובְמִצְוַת יוֹם הַשְבִיעִי הַשַבָת הַגָדוֹל וְהַקָדוֹש הַזֶה. כִי יוֹם זֶה גָדוֹל וְקָדוֹש הוא לְפָנֶיךָ לִשְבָת בוֹ וְלָנוחַ בוֹ בְאַהֲבָה כְמִצְוַת רְצוֹנֶךָ. ובִרְצוֹנְךָ הָנִיחַ לָנו יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינו שֶלֹא תְהֵא צָרָה וְיָגוֹן וַאֲנָחָה בְיוֹם
מְנוחָתֵנו. וְהַרְאֵנו יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינו בְנֶחָמַת צִיוֹן עִירֶךָ ובְבִנְיַן יְרושָלַיִם עִיר קָדְשֶךָ כִי אַתָה הוא בַעַל הַיְשועוֹת ובַעַל הַנֶחָמוֹת.

אֱלֹהֵינו וֵאלֹהֵי אֲבוֹתֵינו, יַעֲלֶה וְיָבאֹ וְיַגִיעַ וְיֵרָאֶה וְיֵרָצֶה וְיִשָמַע וְיִפָקֵד וְיִזָכֵר זִכְרוֹנֵנו ופִקְדוֹנֵנו, וְזִכְרוֹן אֲבוֹתֵינו, וְזִכְרוֹן מָשִיחַ בֶן דָוִד עַבְדֶךָ ,וְזִכְרוֹן יְרושָלַיִם עִיר קָדְשֶךָ, וְזִכְרוֹן כָל עַמְךָ בֵית יִשְרָאֵל לְפָנֶיךָ, לִפְלֵטָה לְטוֹבָה לְחֵן ולְחֶסֶד ולְרַחֲמִים, לְחַיִים ולְשָלוֹם בְיוֹם חַג הַמַצוֹת הַזֶה. זָכְרֵנו יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינו בוֹ לְטוֹבָה ופָקְדֵנו בוֹ לִבְרָכָה וְהוֹשִיעֵנו בוֹ לְחַיִים. ובִדְבַר יְשועָה וְרַחֲמִים חוס וְחָנֵנו וְרַחֵם עָלֵינו וְהוֹשִיעֵנו, כִי אֵלֶיךָ עֵינֵינו, כִי אֵל מֶלֶךְ חַנון וְרַחום אָתָה.

ובְנֵה יְרושָלַיִם עִיר הַקדֶֹש בִמְהֵרָה בְיָמֵינו. בָרוךְ אַתָה יְיָ, בוֹנֵה בְרַחֲמָיו יְרושָלָיִם. אָמֵן.
בָרוךְ אַתָה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינו מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, הָאֵל אָבִינו מַלְכֵנו אַדִירֵנו בוֹרְאֵנו גאֲֹלֵנו יוֹצְרֵנו קְדוֹשֵנו קְדוֹש יַעֲקבֹ, רוֹעֵנו רוֹעֵה יִשְרָאֵל הַמֶלֶךְ הַטוֹב וְהַמֵטִיב לַכלֹ שֶבְכָל יוֹם וָיוֹם הוא הֵטִיב הוא מֵטִיב הוא יֵיטִיב לָנו. הוא גְמָלָנו הוא גוֹמְלֵנו
הוא יִגְמְלֵנו לָעַד לְחֵן ולְחֶסֶד ולְרַחֲמִים ולְרֶוַח הַצָלָה וְהַצְלָחָה בְרָכָה וִישועָה נֶחָמָה פַרְנָסָה וְכַלְכָלָה וְרַחֲמִים וְחַיִים וְשָלוֹם וְכָל טוֹב, ומִכָל טוב לְעוֹלָם אַל יְחַסְרֵנו.
 הרָחַמֲן הוא יִמְלֹךְ עָלֵינו לְעוֹלָם וָעֶד. הָרַחֲמָן הוא יִתְבָרַךְ בַשָמַיִם ובָאָרֶץ. הָרַחֲמָן הוא יִשְתַבַח לְדוֹר דוֹרִים וְיִתְפָאַר בָנו לָעַד ולְנֵצַח נְצָחִים וְיִתְהַדַר בָנו לָעַד ולְעוֹלְמֵי עוֹלָמִים. הָרַחֲמָן הוא יְפַרְנְסֵנו בְכָבוֹד. הָרַחֲמָן הוא יִשְבר עֻלֵנו מֵעַל צַוָארֵנו וְהוא יוֹלִיכֵנו קוֹמְמִיות לְאַרְצֵנו. הָרַחֲמָן הוא יִשְלַח לָנו בְרָכָה מְרֻבָה בַבַיִת הַזֶה וְעַל שֻלְחָן זֶה שֶאָכַלְנו עָלָיו. הָרַחֲמָן הוא יִשְלַח לָנו אֶת אֵלִיָהו הַנָבִיא זָכור לַטוֹב וִיבַשֶר לָנו בְשוֹרוֹת טוֹבוֹת יְשועוֹת וְנֶחָמוֹת.
הָרַחֲמָן הוא יְבָרֵךְ אֶת

For one’s parents


אָבִי מוֹרִי (בַעַל הַבַיִת הַזֶה) וְאֶת אִמִי מוֹרָתִי (בַעֲלַת הַבַיִת הַזֶה), אוֹתָם וְאֶת בֵיתָם וְאֶת זַרְעָםוְאֶת כָל אֲשֶר לָהֶם,

For one’s family

אוֹתִי )וְאֶת אִשְתִי/בַעֲלִי/זַרְעִי( וְאֶת כָל אֲשֶר לִי,

For one’s hosts

בַעַל הַבַיִת הַזֶה וְאֶת בַעֲלַת הַבַיִת הַזֶה, אוֹתָם וְאֶת בֵיתָם וְאֶת זַרְעָם וְאֶת כָל אֲשֶר לָהֶם,

For all others


וְאֶת כָל הַמְסֻבִין כַאן,

 אוֹתָנו וְאֶת כָל אֲשֶר לָנו, כְמוֹ שֶנִתְבָרְכו אֲבוֹתֵינו אַבְרָהָם יִצְחָק וְיַעֲקבֹ בַכלֹ מִכלֹ כלֹ, כֵן יְבָרֵךְ אוֹתָנו כֻלָנו יַחַד בִבְרָכָה שְלֵמָה, וְנאֹמַר אָמֵן
בַמָרוֹם יְלַמְדו עֲלֵיהֶם וְעָלֵינו זְכות שֶתְהֵא לְמִשְמֶרֶת שָלוֹם. וְנִשָא בְרָכָה מֵאֵת יְיָ וצְדָקָה מֵאֱלֹהֵי יִשְעֵנו. וְנִמְצָא חֵן וְשֵכֶל טוֹב בְעֵינֵי אֱלֹהִים וְאָדָם

On Shabbat


הָרַחֲמָן הוא יַנְחִילֵנו יוֹם שֶכֻלוֹ שַבָת ומְנוחָה לְחַיֵי הָעוֹלָמִים.

הָרַחֲמָן הוא יַנְחִילֵנו יוֹם שֶכֻלוֹ טוֹב.

Some add the following


הָרַחֲמָן הוא יְבָרֵךְ אֶת כָל אֲחֵנו בְנֵי יִשְרָאֵל הַנְתונִים בְצָרָה, וְיוֹצִיאֵם מֵאֲפֵלָה לְאוֹרָה.
הָרַחֲמָן הוא יְבָרֵךְ אֶת מְדִנַת יִשְרָאֵל, רֵאשִית צְמִיחַת גְאֻלָתֵנו.
הָרַחֲמָן הוא יְבָרֵךְ אֶת חַיָלֵי צְבָא הֲגַנָה לְיִשְרָאֵל, וְיָגֵן עֲלֵיהֶם.
הָרַחֲמָן הוא יְבָרֵךְ אֶת מְדִנַת הַזאתֹ, וְאֶת חַיָלֶיהָ, וְיָגֵן עֲלֵיהֶם.
הָרַחֲמָן הוא יַשְכְין שָלוֹם בֵין בְנֵי יַעֲקבֹ ובְנֵי יִשְמָעֵאל.

הָרַחֲמָן הוא יְזַכֵנו לִימוֹת הַמָשִיחַ ולְחַיֵי הָעוֹלָם הַבָא.
מִגְדוֹל יְשועוֹת מַלְכוֹ וְעשֶֹה חֶסֶד לִמְשִיחוֹ לְדָוִד ולְזַרְעוֹ עַד עוֹלָם. עשֶֹה שָלוֹם בִמְרוֹמָיו הוא יַעֲשֶה שָלוֹם עָלֵינו וְעַל כָל יִשְרָאֵל, וְאִמְרו אָמֵן.
יְראו אֶת יְיָ קְדשָֹיו כִי אֵין מַחְסוֹר לִירֵאָיו. כְפִירִים רָשו וְרָעֵבו וְדרְֹשֵי יְיָ לֹא יַחְסְרו כָל טוֹב. הוֹדו לַייָ כִי טוֹב כִי לְעוֹלָם חַסְדוֹ. פוֹתֵחַ אֶת יָדֶךָ ומַשְבִיעַ לְכָל חַי רָצוֹן. בָרוךְ הַגֶבֶר אֲשֶר יִבְטַח בַייָ וְהָיָה יְיָ מִבְטַחוֹ. נַעַר הָיִיתִי גַם זָקַנְתִי וְלֹא רָאִיתִי צַדִיק נֶעֱזָב וְזַרְעוֹ מְבַקֶש לָחֶם. יְיָ עזֹ לְעַמוֹ יִתֵן יְיָ יְבָרֵךְ אֶת עַמוֹ בַשָלוֹם.

Bareich
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

Refill everyone’s wine glass.

We now say grace after the meal, thanking God for the food we’ve eaten. On Passover, this becomes something like an extended toast to God, culminating with drinking our third glass of wine for the evening:

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, whose goodness sustains the world. You are the origin of love and compassion, the source of bread for all. Thanks to You, we need never lack for food; You provide food enough for everyone. We praise God, source of food for everyone.

As it says in the Torah: When you have eaten and are satisfied, give praise to your God who has given you this good earth. We praise God for the earth and for its sustenance.

Renew our spiritual center in our time. We praise God, who centers us.

May the source of peace grant peace to us, to the Jewish people, and to the entire world. Amen.

The Third Glass of Wine

The blessing over the meal is immediately followed by another blessing over the wine:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the third glass of wine!

Hallel
Source : JewishBoston.com

The Cup of Elijah

We now refill our wine glasses one last time and open the front door to invite the prophet Elijah to join our seder.

In the Bible, Elijah was a fierce defender of God to a disbelieving people. At the end of his life, rather than dying, he was whisked away to heaven. Tradition holds that he will return in advance of messianic days to herald a new era of peace, so we set a place for Elijah at many joyous, hopeful Jewish occasions, such as a baby’s bris and the Passover seder.

אֵלִיָּֽהוּ הַנָּבִיא, אֵלִיָּֽהוּ הַתִּשְׁבִּיאֵלִיָּֽהוּ, אֵלִיָּֽהוּ,אֵלִיָּֽהוּ הַגִּלְעָדִי

בִּמְהֵרָה בְיָמֵֽנוּ יָבוֹא אֵלֵֽינוּ

עִם מָשִֽׁיחַ בֶּן דָּוִד

עִם מָשִֽׁיחַ בֶּן דָּוִד

Eliyahu hanavi
Eliyahu hatishbi
Eliyahu, Eliyahu, Eliyahu hagiladi
Bimheirah b’yameinu, yavo eileinu
Im mashiach ben-David,
Im mashiach ben-David

Elijah the prophet, the returning, the man of Gilad:
return to us speedily,
in our days with the messiah,
son of David.

Nirtzah
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

Nirtzah  marks the conclusion of the seder. Our bellies are full, we have had several glasses of wine, we have told stories and sung songs, and now it is time for the evening to come to a close. At the end of the seder, we honor the tradition of declaring, “Next year in Jerusalem!”

For some people, the recitation of this phrase expresses the anticipation of rebuilding the Temple in Jerusalem and the return of the Messiah. For others, it is an affirmation of hope and of connectedness with  Klal Yisrael, the whole of the Jewish community. Still others yearn for peace in Israel and for all those living in the Diaspora.

Though it comes at the end of the seder, this moment also marks a beginning. We are beginning the next season with a renewed awareness of the freedoms we enjoy and the obstacles we must still confront. We are looking forward to the time that we gather together again. Having retold stories of the Jewish people, recalled historic movements of liberation, and reflected on the struggles people still face for freedom and equality, we are ready to embark on a year that we hope will bring positive change in the world and freedom to people everywhere.

In  The Leader's Guide to the Family Participation Haggadah: A Different Night, Rabbi David Hartman writes: “Passover is the night for reckless dreams; for visions about what a human being can be, what society can be, what people can be, what history may become.”

What can  we  do to fulfill our reckless dreams? What will be our legacy for future generations?

Our seder is over, according to Jewish tradition and law. As we had the pleasure to gather for a seder this year, we hope to once again have the opportunity in the years to come. We pray that God brings health and healing to Israel and all the people of the world, especially those impacted by natural tragedy and war. As we say…

לְשָׁנָה הַבָּאָה בִּירוּשָׁלָֽיִם

L’shana haba-ah biy’rushalayim

NEXT YEAR IN JERUSALEM!

Songs
by VBS
Source : Valley Beth Shalom Haggadah

When Israel was in Egypt land, "Let my people go!"

Oppressed so hard they could not stand. "Let my people go!"

Go down, Moses, way down in Egypt Land. Tell ol' Pharaoh: "Let my people go!"

The Lord told Moses what to do, "Let my people go!"

To lead the children of Israel through, "Let my people go!"

Songs
Source : JewishBoston.com

Chad Gadya

חַד גַּדְיָא, חַד גַּדְיָא

דְזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי

חַד גַּדְיָא, חַד גַּדְיָא

Chad gadya, chad gadya

Dizabin abah bitrei zuzei

Chad gadya, chad gadya.

One little goat, one little goat:

Which my father brought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The cat came and ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The dog came and bit the cat

That ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The stick came and beat the dog

That bit the cat that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The fire came and burned the stick

That beat the dog that bit the cat

That ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The water came and extinguished the

Fire that burned the stick

That beat the dog that bit the cat

That ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The ox came and drank the water

That extinguished the fire

That burned the stick that beat the dog That bit the cat that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The butcher came and killed the ox,

That drank the water

That extinguished the fire

That burned the stick that beat the dog That bit the cat that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The angle of death came and slew

The butcher who killed the ox,

That drank the water

That extinguished the fire

That burned the stick that beat the dog That bit the cat that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The Holy One, Blessed Be He came and

Smote the angle of death who slew

The butcher who killed the ox,

That drank the water

That extinguished the fire

That burned the stick that beat the dog That bit the cat that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

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