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Introduction
Source : Sages

"It is not your obligation to complete the task [of creating a better world] but neither are you free to desist from it."

~ Rabbi Tarfon

"If I am not for myself, who will be for me?

But if I am only for myself, what am I?

And if not now, when?"

~ Rabbi Hillel

Introduction
Source : Traditional Liturgy

Hine ma tov 
uma nayim 
shevet achim gam yachad. 
Hine ma tov 
uma nayim 
shevet achim gam yachad.

How good and pleasant it is when people live together in harmony

Kadesh
Source : Chabad

Blessing Over the Candles

Baruch Atah Ado-nai, Elo-heinu Melech Ha-olam, Asher Kid’shanu

B’mitzvotav V’tzivanu L’hadlik Ner Shel Yom Tov.

Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the Universe, who has

sanctified us with His commandments and commanded us that

we kindle the Yom Tov (Holiday) lights.

Blessing Over the Wine

Ba-ruch a-tah A-do-nai, E-lo-hey-nu Me-lech ha-o-lam,
Bo-rey p’-ri ha-ga-fen.

Praised are you, Adonai our God, Ruler of the universe, who creates the fruit of the vine.

(Let's drink the first cup of wine!)

Urchatz
Source : Original
At this point, I will symbolically wash my hands for all of us, without saying the blessing. As I take a moment to wash my hands, imagine that you are washing away all anxiety and stress in your life, and allow yourself to be filled with the hope that the world can be a better place for us all.
Karpas
Source : haggadot.com

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הָאֲדָמָה.

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu melech ha’olam, borei p’ri ha’adamah.

Blessed are You, Lord, our God, Ruler of the universe, who creates the fruit of the earth.

Karpas
Source : The Song of Songs

Excerpts from The Song of Songs, as translated by Chana and Ariel Bloch

Now he has brought me to the house of wine,
and his flag over me is love.

Let me lie among vine blossoms,
in a bed of apricots!
I am in the fever of love.

His left hand beneath my head,
his right arm
holding me close.

Daughters of Jerusalem, swear to me
by the gazelles, by the deer in the field,
that you will never awaken love
until it is ripe.

-----

Look, winter is over,

the rains are done,

wildflowers spring up in the fields.

Now is the time of the nightingale.

In every meadow you hear

the song of the turtledove.

The fig tree has sweetened

its new green fruit

and the young budded vines smell spicy.

Hurry, my love, my friend

and come away.

Yachatz
Source : Free Siddur Project, adapted

Raise the Matzah

Ha lachma anya di achalu avhatana b’ara d’mitzrayim. Kol dichfin yeitei v’yeichol, kol ditzrich yeitei v’yifsach. Hashata hacha, l’shanah habaah b’ara d’Yisrael. Hashata avdei, l’shanah habaah b’nei chorin.

Yachatz
Source : Free Siddur Project, adapted

Raise the Matzah

This is the bread of affliction, which our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt. Let all who are hungry come and eat. Let all who are in need, come and celebrate Passover. Today, we are here. Next year, in the land of Israel.

Today, we are slaves. Next year, we will be free.

Maggid - Beginning
Source : original

Many questions have arisen about this snippet of text.  What were these rabbis doing in B’nei Brak, which was the hometown of Rabbi Akiva only?

Why didn’t their students join them in celebrating the seder?  Why didn’t the rabbis themselves notice the rising of the sun? 

Context is everything.  This story takes place during the rule of the Roman emperor Hadrian, who ordered that the Temple be moved so he could put a temple to Jupiter on the Temple Mount.


In the year 123 of the Common Era, a guerilla insurgency began, which resulted in a crack-down by the Roman authorities.  B’nei Brak was the headquarters of the rebellion against Roman occupation, a rebellion of which Rabbi Akiva was a leader.  Because of rebel activities, the Roman authorities had forbidden gatherings of Jews, on pain of death.  The seder described in this passage was used not only as a chance to discuss the liberation from Egypt—but also to plan a strategy of resistance against Roman occupation.  The students were standing guard, ready to caution the rabbis to disband at daybreak, lest they be caught.  This tale may be read as an encouragement to become so joyfully immersed in the seder that we don’t notice the passing of time...and it may also be read as a story of how one liberation begets another.  Celebrating our freedom from servitude can be a radical act.  It was Rabbi Akiva, after all, who famously answered the query, “Which is better, study or action?” with the response, “Study—if it leads to action.

-- Four Questions
Source : Free Siddur Project - adapted

Mah nishtanah halaylah hazeh mikol haleilot?

Sheb’chol haleilot anu och’lin chameitz umatzah,

-halaylah hazeh kulo matzah.

Sheb’chol haleilot anu och’lin sh’ar y’rakot,

-halaylah hazeh maror.

Sheb’chol haleilot ein anu matbilin afilu pa’am echat,

-halaylah hazeh sh’tei f’amim.

Sheb’khol haleilot anu okhlim bein yoshvin uvein m’subin,

-halailah hazeh kulanu m’subin.

 

-- Four Children
Source : Ben Aronin

The Ballad of the Four Sons(to the tune of "Clementine") wriiten by Ben Aronin in 1948

Said the father to his children,

"At the seder you will dine,

You will eat your fill of matzah,

You will drink four cups of wine."

Now this father had no daughters,

But his sons they numbered four.

One was wise and one was wicked,

One was simple and a bore.

And the fourth was sweet and winsome,

he was young and he was small.

While his brothers asked the questions

he could scarcely speak at all.

Said the wise one to his father

"Would you please explain the laws?

Of the customs of the seder

Will you please explain the cause?"

And the father proudly answered,

"As our fathers ate in speed,

Ate the paschal lamb 'ere midnight

And from slavery were freed."

So we follow their example

And 'ere midnight must complete

All the seder and we should not

After 12 remain to eat.

Then did sneer the son so wicked

"What does all this mean to you?"

And the father's voice was bitter

As his grief and anger grew.

"If you yourself don't consider As son of Israel,

Then for you this has no meaning

You could be a slave as well."

Then the simple son said simply "What is this," and quietly

The good father told his offspring

"We were freed from slavery."

But the youngest son was silent

For he could not ask at all.

His bright eyes were bright with wonder

As his father told him all.

My dear children, heed the lesson

and remember evermore

What the father told his children

Told his sons that numbered four.

 
-- Four Children
-- Four Children
Source : Original

The ‘Redemptionist Child’ – what does he say? The whole of the historical land of Israel belongs to the Jewish people and talk about ‘peace’ with the Arabs is dangerous utopianism. The world has an implacable hatred towards us and nothing we can do will change that. The international community may show sympathy when we are weak but it can’t stomach the resurgence of Jewish sovereignty and power to its ancestral homeland. Even when we endanger our own soldiers so as not to hurt Palestinian civilians we are accused of carrying out massacres and genocide. Whether we like to admit it or not, Jews will always be a ‘people that dwells alone’ and concessions in order to gain favour with the Arabs or ‘Goyim’ makes us look spineless and imperils more Jewish lives. Things may look bleak but redemption is within reach. We need to have faith, be steadfast and unify the people around true Torah values, one of which is settling and taking ownership over all the land of Eretz Yisrael.

The ‘Realist’ Child - what does he say? Peace with the Palestinians may be possible, but not in this generation. At the Palestinians’ core - their public statements, television programs, textbooks - they don’t accept the right of the Jewish people to live in a state of our own. Each withdrawal is not perceived as a sign of our peaceful intentions but as weakness and capitulation, evidence that we’re no longer willing to fight and struggle for the justice of our cause. We withdrew from Lebanon and Gaza and got rockets in response. How can we consider a similar withdrawal from the West Bank? We need to cause the Palestinians to internalise the fact that we’re here to stay, that we have roots in this land, that we’re not leaving. We can ultimately achieve peace, but it will take time, and we need to be patient. In the meantime we need to sit tight, and continue to fight. It sounds fatalistic but with the correct education, Israeli society has the capacity to survive the storm.

The ‘Pragmatic’ child – what does he say? I’m not necessarily a fan of the Palestinians, but Israel’s continued control over the West Bank is bad for our national security. ‘Occupation’ causes our friends to desert us, demography erodes the chances for the two state solution and isolated settlements actually make it harder to defend ourselves against terrorism. We think our control strengthens us. Yet ultimately it weakens us. The forces of religious extremism are on the rise. And unless we resolve our differences with those Palestinians who accept the two state solution, the window of opportunity for a secure Jewish and democratic state may close. Peace doesn’t mean we’ll eat hummus in Damascus and Ramallah or stop calling up people to Miluim. But in an unstable neighbourhood in unstable times, an agreement that ensures a Jewish majority in approximately 80% of Mandatory Palestine while guaranteeing normalization with the Arab world is worth considering, even if it entails painful concessions. It is after all, a situation that original Zionist leaders could only dream of.

The ‘Justice’ child – what does he say? The continued occupation over millions of Palestinians is poisoning and corrupting Israeli society, undermining our social fabric and is a betrayal of the core values of Judaism (and Zionism).  The Israeli – Palestinian conflict is a tragic struggle of right against right – with both sides having legitimate claims and grievances on the other. As a people, the Jews deserve the right to self determination, to express our national values and dreams…but so do the Palestinians. While we have religious, historical and cultural connections to this land, so do the Palestinians. Zionism is the national liberation movement for the Jewish people. But it loses its moral legitimacy when it denies that same thing to another people. We have a responsibility to partition the land and undo the injustice our (justified) presence in our homeland has caused to the Palestinians.

-- Exodus Story
Source : The Velveteen Rabbi's Haggadah for Passover, assembled by Rachel Barenblat

1.


Once upon a time our people went into galut, exile, in the land of Egypt. During a famine, our ancestor Jacob and his family fled to Egypt where food was plentiful. Through a complicated set of plot twists, his son Joseph had risen to high position in Pharaoh's court, and our people were well-respected and well-regarded, secure in the power structure of the time.

2.


Generations passed and our people remained in Egypt. As rulers came and went, a new Pharaoh ascended to the throne. He felt threatened by the strangers in his people's midst, and ordered our people enslaved.

In fear of rebellion, Pharaoh decreed that all Hebrew boy-children be killed. Two midwives named Shifrah and Puah defied his orders, claiming that "the Hebrew women are so hardy, they give birth before we arrive!" Through their courage, a boy survived.

Fearing for his safety, his family placed him in a basket and he floated down the Nile. He was found and adopted, by Pharaoh's daughter, who named him Moshe because  min ha-mayim m'shitihu, from the water she drew him forth. She hired his mother Yocheved as his wet-nurse. Thus he survived to adulthood and was raised as Prince of Egypt.

3.

Although a child of privilege, as he grew he became aware of the slaves who worked in the brickyards of his father. When he saw an overseer mistreat a slave, he struck the overseer and killed him. Fearing retribution, he set out across the Sinai alone. 

God spoke to him from a burning bush, which though it flamed was not consumed. The Voice called him to lead the Hebrew people to freedom. Moses argued with God, pleading inadequacy, but God disagreed. Sometimes our responsibilities choose us. 

4.

Moses returned to Egypt and went to Pharaoh to argue the injustice of slavery. He gave Pharaoh a mandate with resounds through history: Let my people go.

Pharaoh refused, and Moses warned him that Mighty God would strike the Egyptian people. These threats were not idle: ten terrible plagues were unleashed upon the Egyptians. Only when his nation lay in ruins did Pharaoh agree to our liberation.

5.

Fearful that Pharaoh would change his mind, our people fled, not waiting for their bread dough to rise. (For this reason we eat unleavened bread as we take part in their journey.) Our people did not leave Egypt alone; a "mixed multitude" went with them.  From this we learn that liberation is not for us alone, but for all the nations of the earth.

Even Pharaoh's daughter came with us, and traded her old title ( bat-Pharaoh,  daugther of Pharaoh) for the name Batya, "daughter of God."

Pharaoh's army followed us to the Sea of Reeds. We plunged into the waters. Only when we had gone as far as we could did the waters part for us. We mourn, even now, that Pharaoh's army drowned: our liberation is bittersweet because people died in our pursuit. 

7. 

To this day we relive our liberation, that we may not become complacent, that we may always rejoice in our freedom. 

-- Exodus Story
Source : Reform movement's Social Justice Haggadah http://rac.org/pubs/holidayguides/passover/

When Israel was in Egypt land --- Let my people go

Oppressed so hard they could not stand --- Let my people go.

Chorus: Go down Moses,  Way down to Egypt land,   Tell old Pharoah   To let my people go.  

And G-d told Moses what to do --- Let my people go!

To lead the children of Israel through --- Let my people go!

Chorus: Go down Moses,  Way down to Egypt land,   Tell old Pharoah   To let my people go. 

-- Ten Plagues
Source : The Velveteen Rabbi's Haggadah for Passover, assembled by Rachel Barenblat

Midrash teaches that, while watching the Egyptians succumb to the ten plagues, the angels broke into songs of jubilation. God rebuked them, saying, "My creatures are perishing, and you sing praises?"

As we recite each plague, we spill a drop of wine - symbol of joy - from our cups. Our joy in our liberation will always be tarnished by the pain visited upon the Egyptians.

Blood

Frogs

Lice

Insect Swarms

Cattle Plague

Boils

Hail

Locusts 

Darkness

Death of the First-Born

Today's world holds plagues as well. Let us spill drops of wine as we recite:

Apathy in the face of evil

Brutal torture of the helpless

Cruel mockery of the old and the weak

Despair of human goodness

Envy of the joy of others

Falsehood and deception corroding our faith

Greedy theft of the earth's resources

Hatred of learning and culture

Instigation of war and aggression

Justice delayed, justice denied, justice mocked...

Shekhinah, soften our hearts and the hearts of our enemies. Help us to dream new paths to freedom, so that the next sea-opening is not also a drowning; so that our singing is never again their wailing. So that our freedom leaves no one orphaned, childless, gasping for air. 

-- Ten Plagues
by VBS
Source : Valley Beth Shalom Haggadah

One morning when Pharaoh awoke in his bed,

there were frogs in his bed. And frogs on his head.

Frogs on his toes and frogs on his nose.

Frogs here! Frogs there! Frogs were jumping everywhere! 

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Unknown

In every generation, we must see ourselves as if we personally were liberated from Egypt. We gather tonight to tell the ancient story of a people's liberation from Egyptian slavery. This is the story of our origins as a people. It is from these events that we gain our ethics, our vision of history, our dreams for the future.

We gather tonight, as two hundred generations of Jewish families have before us, to retell the timeless tale.  Yet our tradition requires that on Seder night, we do more than just tell the story. We must live the story. Tonight, we will re-experience the liberation from Egypt. We will remember how our family suffered as slaves; we will feel the exhilaration of redemption. We must re-taste the bitterness of slavery and must rejoice over our newfound freedom. We annually return to Egypt in order to be freed. We remember slavery in order to deepen our commitment to end all suffering; we recreate our liberation in order to reinforce our commitment to universal freedom.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Various

It’s time to drink the second cup of wine .....

ברוך אתה ה' א‑לוהינו מלך העולם, בורא פרי הגפן.

Barukh atah Adonai Eloheinu Melekh ha'olam, bo're p'ri ha'gafen.

"Blessed are You, LORD, our God, King of the universe, Who creates the fruit of the vine." Amen.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : wikipedia

If He had brought us out from Egypt אִלּוּ הוֹצִיאָנוּ מִמִּצְרָיִם

and had not carried out judgments against them וְלֹא עָשָׂה בָּהֶם שְׁפָטִים

— Dayenu, it would have been enough דַּיֵּנוּ

If He had carried out judgments against them אִלּוּ עָשָׂה בָּהֶם שְׁפָטִים

and not against their idols וְלֹא עָשָׂה בֵּאלֹהֵיהֶם

— Dayenu, it would have been enough דַּיֵּנוּ

If He had destroyed their idols אִלּוּ עָשָׂה בֵּאלֹהֵיהֶם

and had not smitten their first-born וְלֹא הָרַג אֶת בְּכוֹרֵיהֶם

— Dayenu, it would have been enough דַּיֵּנוּ

If He had smitten their first-born אִלּוּ הָרַג אֶת בְּכוֹרֵיהֶם

and had not given us their wealth וְלֹא נָתַן לָנוּ אֶת מָמוֹנָם

— Dayenu, it would have been enough דַּיֵּנוּ

If He had given us their wealth אִלּוּ נָתַן לָנוּ אֶת מָמוֹנָם

and had not split the sea for us וְלא קָרַע לָנוּ אֶת הַיָּם

— Dayenu, it would have been enough דַּיֵּנוּ

If He had split the sea for us אִלּוּ קָרַע לָנוּ אֶת הַיָּם

and had not taken us through it on dry land וְלֹא הֶעֱבִירָנוּ בְּתוֹכוֹ בֶּחָרָבָה

— Dayenu, it would have been enough דַּיֵּנוּ

If He had taken us through the sea on dry land אִלּוּ הֶעֱבִירָנוּ בְּתוֹכוֹ בֶּחָרָבָה

and had not drowned our oppressors in it וְלֹא שִׁקַע צָרֵינוּ בְּתוֹכוֹ

— Dayenu, it would have been enough דַּיֵּנוּ

If He had drowned our oppressors in it אִלּוּ שִׁקַע צָרֵינוּ בְּתוֹכוֹ

and had not supplied our needs in the desert for forty years וְלֹא סִפֵּק צָרַכֵּנוּ בַּמִּדְבָּר אַרְבָּעִים שָׁנָה

— Dayenu, it would have been enough דַּיֵּנוּ

If He had supplied our needs in the desert for forty years אִלּוּ סִפֵּק צָרַכֵּנוּ בַּמִּדְבָּר אַרְבָּעִים שָׁנָה

and had not fed us the manna וְלֹא הֶאֱכִילָנוּ אֶת הַמָּן

— Dayenu, it would have been enough דַּיֵּנוּ

If He had fed us the manna אִלּוּ הֶאֱכִילָנוּ אֶת הַמָּן

and had not given us the Shabbat וְלֹא נָתַן לָנוּ אֶת הַשַּׁבָּת

— Dayenu, it would have been enough דַּיֵּנוּ

If He had given us the Shabbat אִלּוּ נָתַן לָנוּ אֶת הַשַּׁבָּת

and had not brought us before Mount Sinai וְלֹא קֵרְבָנוּ לִפְנֵי הַר סִינַי

— Dayenu, it would have been enough דַּיֵּנוּ

If He had brought us before Mount Sinai אִלּוּ קֵרְבָנוּ לִפְנֵי הַר סִינַי

and had not given us the Torah וְלֹא נָתַן לָנוּ אֶת הַתּוֹרָה

— Dayenu, it would have been enough דַּיֵּנוּ

If He had given us the Torah אִלּוּ נָתַן לָנוּ אֶת הַתּוֹרָה

and had not brought us into the land of Israel וְלֹא הִכְנִיסָנוּ לְאֶרֶץ יִשְׂרָאֵל

— Dayenu, it would have been enough דַּיֵּנוּ

If He had brought us into the land of Israel אִלּוּ הִכְנִיסָנוּ לְאֶרֶץ יִשְׂרָאֵל

and not built for us the Holy Temple וְלֹא בָּנָה לָנוּ אֶת בֵּית הַמִּקְדָּשׁ

— Dayenu, it would have been enough דַּיֵּנוּ

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : http://zemerl.com/cgi-bin/show.pl?title=Dayenu

Ilu ho-tsi, ho-tsi-a-nu, 
Ho-tsi-a-nu mi-Mitz-ra-yim, 
Ho-tsi-a-nu mi-Mitz-ra-yim, 
Da-ye-nu!

.. CHORUS: 
.. Dai, da-ye-nu, 
.. Dai, da-ye-nu, 
.. Dai, da-ye-nu, 
.. Da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu! 
.. 
.. Dai, da-ye-nu, 
.. Dai, da-ye-nu, 
.. Dai, da-ye-nu, 
.. Da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu!

Ilu na-tan, na-tan la-nu, 
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-Sha-bat, 
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-Sha-bat, 
Da-ye-nu!

.. (CHORUS)

Ilu na-tan, na-tan la-nu, 
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-To-rah, 
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-To-rah, 
Da-ye-nu!

.. (CHORUS) 

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Original/compiled

One of most beloved songs in the Passover seder is "Dayenu". The stanzas are read one at a time, and the participants respond, "Dayenu" – meaning, “it would have been enough”. 

How many times do we forget to pause and notice that where we are is exactly where we ought to be? Dayenu is a reminder to never forget all the miracles in our lives. When we stand and wait impatiently for the next one to appear, we are missing the whole point of life. Instead, we can actively seek a new reason to be grateful, a reason to say “Dayenu.”

And now, for something completely different: we’re going to channel the Persian and Afghani Jews, who hit each other over the heads and shoulders with scallions every time they say Dayeinu! They especially use the scallions in the ninth stanza which mentions the manna that the Israelites ate everyday in the desert, because Torah tells us that the Israelites began to complain about the manna and longed for the onions, leeks and garlic. So hit your neighbor – gently!

 
Rachtzah
Source : Compiled

As we now transition from the formal telling of the Passover story to the celebratory meal, we once again wash our hands to prepare ourselves. A good meal together with friends and family is itself a sacred act, so we prepare for it just as we prepared for our holiday ritual, recalling the way ancient priests once prepared for service in the Temple.

Anyone who wishes to is welcome to wash their hands.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו, וְצִוָּנוּ  עַל נְטִילַת יָדָֽיִם:

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al n’tilat yadayim.

Blessed are you, spirit of the world, who made us holy through simple deeds like the washing of our hands.

Motzi-Matzah
Source : Adapted from several sources

The blessing over the meal and matzah ה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, hamotzi lechem min ha-aretz.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who brings bread from the land.

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat matzah.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to eat matzah.

Distribute and eat the top and middle matzah for everyone to eat.

Reader 1: We are meant to fully experience the flatness and blandness of the matzah , not to mention its visual similarity to cardboard. This is a food that has no real identity of its own. It is completely ready to receive.  It is ready to be impressed upon: in the physical world, by a nice schmeer of guacamole; and in the spiritual world by the profound spiritual imprint that God wants to impress upon each of us.  Eating matzah aligns us toward receptivity to whatever God wants us to have.

Reader 2: Unlike most foods, matzah is essentially free of a third dimension. It is flat.  It has not yet 'grown' 'up'.   But this is because God wants us not to grow in the usual way.  He has a different third dimension in mind for us, one that does not follow the rules of linear growth.  Inasmuch as we are attached to identity, we cannot completely receive Holy Identity.   As we eat the matzah , then, let us strive to become like the matzah as much as we can, so that we can be impressed upon by God who engraves upon us.

Motzi-Matzah
Source : original

The Seder Plate

Think of the Seder Plate as a “combination plate” dinner that formed the meal in ancient days. The foods were not merely symbolic, but were eaten—from the plate. As the Seder menu changed, the foods on the Seder Plate required explanation. (clockwise from the upper-right-of-center)

Zeroa (shankbone), represents the Passover offering made in Temple times.

Beitzah(boiled or roasted egg), represents the holiday offering made in the days of the Temple.

Maror (bitter herbs), is horseradish and represents the bitterness of slavery in Egypt.11 It will be explained during the Seder.

Charoset ( a mixture of chopped nuts, apples and wine (and other wonderful ingredients) represents the clay the Jews used to make bricks for the Egyptians.

Chazeret another bitter herb, a bitter lettuce.

Karpas any green vegetable (parsley, celery—some traditions suggest a boiled potato), represents the new

Maror
Source : original

Rabban Gamliel insists that we must say these three things in order to fulfill our obligation on Pesach: Pesach, Matzah, Maror. It is surprising that we must say the words. Isn't it enough just to eat them?   We must talk them out because these three mitzvot convey three fundamental principles in our belief in Hashem. Each of them describes a way in which Hashem is subtle and exact in how He relates to us and provides for us.

'Pesach - For what?  To acknowledge that Hashem pasach (skipped over) the houses of our ancestors in Egypt.' This represents Hashem's willingness/capacity to act in a precise way toward us. By not giving license to the forces of destruction to act freely during the plague of the first-born sons, Hashem was expressing willingness to give each and every person exactly what he or she needs.  And this is essential to appreciating the events in our lives.  As Rebbe Nachman says, Hashem sends each of us hints, according to the time, place, and person, about how to come close to Him.  If Hashem isn't exact, there are no hints.  But if He is, then everything around is is calibrated to convey very specific messages to us. 

The second statement of faith, matzah , corresponds to Hashem's precision in time. 'The dough was not allowed to leaven before the King of Kings, the Holy One Blessed is He, appeared to them and redeemed them.' Now, matzah takes 18 minutes to become chometz.  That means we started making dough like it would be a normal day, with no sense that today was The Day, and within 18 minutes it became clear that this would be the day of redemption. The situations and challenges that Hashem gives us are not open-ended: It may be that such-and-such an illness, or situation, or suffering is meant to last exactly 7 months, 12 days, 3 hours and 5 minutes before that job offer/chance meeting/ doctor's appointment happens.  Hashem is precise in time. 

The third foundation of faith - maror - reminds us of how the Egyptians embittered our lives in slavery. The goal is to believe that suffering and bitterness are among the tools Hashem uses in order to bring about our full tikkun, our full fixing. We might forget this in the midst of our suffering, but as R' Tzvi Meir Zilberberg says, “Every moment of struggle, of confinement and test, whether it concerns our character, our desires, or any matter concerning G-d-service, everything is exactly measured, that it will be precisely oriented toward the benefit, lights and needs of this particular soul, and all the souls dependent upon it─not more and not less.”

Eating these three special foods ingrains these levels of belief into our bodies. But saying and discussing them establishes them in the world of conversation, of interaction, and of intellect. By declaring our faith to the world, we let each other know that we want our relationships to be infused with this faith.

Maror
Source : <a href="http://bit.ly/gKVuNh">Rabbi Geela Rayzel Raphael, Five Interfaith Passover Readings You Can Add to Your Haggadah</a>
Maror (bitter herbs, such as horseradish)--the symbol of bitterness and slavery of the Israelites in Egypt. Today, in a Jewish community that is free, this bitterness takes on another layer of meaning. We acknowledge that there are many among us who are embittered by their feelings of resentment, discomfort, and fear. We know that there is just cause for some of these feelings of fear, for Jews were "other" for so many centuries and mistreated just because they were different.

This laden history has often contributed to some of our families' inability to accept the idea of intermarriage. We acknowledge that Jewish people have struggled and been enslaved in the past and we stretch to transform this defeated posture. We also know that sometimes our own enslavement or emotional bondage prevents us from being open to hearing each other in our marriage. Loyalties to families of origin need to be honored, unless they prevent us from creating true intimacy. Bitter places are stuck places, and we commit ourselves tonight to moving beyond our own positions to find new points of intersection and connection.

Tonight we dip our bitterness in the sweetness of charoset. Charoset, the sweet mixture of fruits and nuts, symbolizes the mortar of the bricks of the Israelites. It is also the mortar of commitment and interdependence that enabled the Jewish community to survive through those centuries of oppression. It is the building blocks of hope and tradition, which are sweet. We take our maror of fear, and by dipping it into the sweetness we create a new model that honors the fear and suffering yet holds out hope for the future.

By blending our maror and charoset, we acknowledge the blending of faiths and traditions that sit around this table here tonight. We know it is not always sweet and it is not always bitter, but that life is a mixture of both. Just as our taste buds are designed for sweet, salty, sour and bitter, so we taste the range of textures of our relationships. By our dipping tonight we bring together the bitter and the sweet for something new to emerge.

Maror
Source : Jconnect Seattle's Liberal Seder

In the early 1980s, the Hillel Foundation invited me to speak on a panel at Oberlin College. While on campus, I came across a Haggadah that had been written by some Oberlin students to express feminist concerns. One ritual they devised was placing a crust of bread on the Seder plate, as a sign of solidarity with Jewish lesbians, a statement of defiance against a rebbetzin’s pronouncement that, “There’s as much room for a lesbian in Judaism as there is for a crust of bread on the seder plate.”

At the next Passover, I placed an orange on our family's Seder plate. During the first part of the Seder, I asked everyone to take a segment of the orange, make the blessing over fruit, and eat it as a gesture of solidarity with Jewish lesbians and gay men, and others who are marginalized within the Jewish community.

Bread on the Seder plate brings an end to Pesach-- it renders everything chametz. And it suggests that being lesbian is being transgressive, violating Judaism. I felt that an orange was suggestive of something else: the fruitfulness for all Jews when lesbians and gay men are contributing and active members of Jewish life. In addition, each orange segment had a few seeds that had to be spit out--a gesture of spitting out, repudiating the homophobia of Judaism.

When lecturing, I often mentioned my custom as one of many new feminist rituals that have been developed in the last twenty years. Somehow, though, the typical patriarchal maneuver occurred:

My idea of an orange and my intention of affirming lesbians and gay men were transformed. Now the story circulates that a man said to me that a woman belongs on the bimah as an orange on the Seder plate. A woman's words are attributed to a man, and the affirmation of lesbians and gay men is simply erased.

Isn't that precisely what's happened over the centuries to women's ideas? And isn’t this precisely the erasure of their existence that gay and lesbian Jews continue to endure, to this day?

- Excerpted from an Email from Professor Susannah Heschel

Maror
Source : Sue Fishkoff, JTA
The olive branch is a universal symbol of peace, associated with the dove in the story of Noah's Ark and the Flood.

Olive trees mature slowly, so only when there was an extended time of peace, with agriculture left undisturbed, could the olive tree produce its fruit. In 2008, Jewish Voice for Peace promoted putting an olive on the seder plate as part of its Trees of Reconciliation project, which sought to donate 3,000 olive saplings to Palestinian farmers to replant trees torn down to make room for Jewish settlements in the West Bank.

This year, we have olives on our seder plate to remind us that not only are we not free until everyone is free, but we are not free until there is peace in our homes, in our community and in our world.

Adonai oz l’amo yitein, Adonai yivarech v’et amo v’shalom.

God give strength to our people, God bless our people with peace.

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu melech ha’olam, borei p’ri ha’eitz.

Blessed are you, Adonai, who gives us the fruit of the tree.

Koreich
Source : Various

While the English Earl of Sandwich is generally credited for inventing the snack of his namesake, Hillel may have originated it two thousand years ago by combining matzah, a slice of paschal lamb, and a bitter herb. Jews no longer sacrifice and eat the lamb, so the Passover sandwich is only matzah, charoset, and a bitter herb now.

Each person receives some bitter herbs and ḥaroses, which they place between two pieces of matzo.

All say in unison: “Kein ah-saw Hillel” and eat the sandwich reclining.

Tzafun
Source : chabad.org

After the meal, take the Afikoman and divide it among all the members of the household, by giving everyone a kezayit (the volume of one olive).

Take care not to eat or drink (only water allowed, but not recommended) after the Afikoman.

It is to be eaten in the reclining position and this ought to be done before midnight.

Commentary / Readings
Source : Abraham Lincoln

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate -- we can not consecrate -- we can not hallow -- this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us -- that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion -- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain -- that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom -- and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Songs
Source : http://www.sacred-texts.com/jud/uh/uh21.htm

An only kid! An only kid

My father bought for two zuzim 

Chad gadya, Chad gadya

Then came the cat and ate the kid

My father bought For two zuzim.

Chad gadya, Chad gadya

Then came the dog And bit the cat

That ate the kid

My father bought For two zuzim.

Chad gadya, Chad gadya

Then came the stick and beat the dog

That bit the cat that ate the kid

My father bought For two zuzim.

Chad gadya, Chad gadya

 Then came the fire and burned the stick

That beat the dog That bit the cat

That ate the kid

My father boughtFor two zuzim.

Chad gadya, Chad gadya

 Then came the water and quenched the fire

That burned the stick That beat the dog

That bit the cat That ate the kid

My father bought For two zuzim.

Chad gadya, Chad gadya

 Then came the ox and drank the water

That quenched the fire That burned the stick

That beat the dog That bit the cat

That ate the kid

My father boughtFor two zuzim.

Chad gadya, Chad gadya

8. Then came the butcher And killed the ox . . . 

9 Then came the angel of deathAnd slew the butcher . . 

10. Then came the Holy One, blest be He!And destroyed the angel of death . . 

Songs
Source : Free Siddur Project, adapted

Chad gadya, chad gadya.


D’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata shunra v’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata chalba v’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata chutra v’hika l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata nura v’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata maya v’chava l’nura,

d’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata tora v’shatah l’maya,

d’chava l’nura,

d’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah, 

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata hashocheit v’shachat l’tora,

d’shata l’maya,

d’chava l’nura,

d’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata malach hamavet v’shachat l’shocheit,

d’shachat l’tora,

d’shata l’maya,

d’chava l’nura,

d’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata Hakodesh Baruch Hu v’shachat l’malach hamavet,

d’shachat l’shocheit,

d’shachat l’tora,

d’shata l’maya,

d’chava l’nura,

d’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.

Songs
Source : A Growing Haggadah, from the Altabet family tradition

Un Cavritico

Un cavritico, que lo merco mi padre por dos levanim, por dos levanim.

Y vino el gato y se comio el cavritico, que lo merco mi padre por dos levanim, por dos levanim.

Y vino el perro y que mordio el gato, que se comio el cavritico, que lo merco mi padre por dos levanim, por dos levanim.

Y vino el palo y aharvo el perro, que mordio el gato, que se comio el cavritico, que lo merco mi padre por dos levanim, por dos levanim.

Y vino el fuego y quemo el palo, que aharvo el perro, que mordio el gato, que se comio el cavritico, que lo merco mi padre por dos levanim, por dos levanim.

Y vino la agua y ya mato el fuego, que quemo el palo, que aharvo el perro, que mordio el gato, que se comio el cavritico, que lo merco mi padre por dos levanim, por dos levanim. Y vino el buey y se bevio la agua, que ya mato el fuego, que quemo el palo, que aharvo el perro, que mordio el gato, que se comio el cavritico, que lo merco mi padre por dos levanim, por dos levanim.

Y vino el shoket y degollo el buey, que se bevio la agua, que ya mato el fuego, que quemo el palo, que aharvo el perro, que mordio el gato, que se comio el cavritico, que lo merco mi padre por dos levanim, por dos levanim. Y vino el malah amavet y degollo shoket, que degollo al buey, que se bevio la agua, que ya mato el fuego, que quemo el palo, que aharvo el perro, que mordio el gato, que se comio el cavritico, que lo merco mi padre por dos levanim, por dos levanim. Y vino el Santo Bendicho y degollo el malah amavet, que degollo shoket, que degollo al buey, que se bevio la agua, que ya mato el fuego, que quemo el palo, que aharvo el perro, que mordio el gato, que se comio el cavritico, que lo merco mi padre por dos levanim, por dos levanim.

Songs
Source : http://hebrewsongs.com/song-echadmiyodea.htm

ECHAD MI YODE'A

Echad mi yode'a 
Echad ani yode'a 
Echad Elokeinu shebashamaim uva'aretz. 

Shnaim mi yode'a
Shnaim ani yode'a
shnei luchot habrit
echad elokeinu shebashamaim uva'aretz. 

Shlosha mi yode'a,
Shlosha ani yode'a. 
Shlosha avot,
shnei luchot habrit
echad elokeinu shebashamaim uva'aretz. 

Arba mi yode'a
arba ani yode'a
arba imahot
Shlosha avot,
shnei luchot habrit
echad elokeinu shebashamaim uva'aretz. 

Chamisha, mi yode'a
Chamisha, ani yode'a
Chamisha chumshei torah
arba imahot
Shlosha avot,
shnei luchot habrit
echad elokeinu shebashamaim uva'aretz. 

Shisha, mi yode'a? 
Shisha, ani yode'a
Shisha, sidre mishna
Chamisha chumshei torah
arba imahot
Shlosha avot,
shnei luchot habrit
echad elokeinu shebashamaim uva'aretz. 

Shiv'ah mi yode'a
shiv'ah ani yode'a. 
shiv'ah yemei shabatah
Shisha, sidre mishna
Chamisha chumshei torah
arba imahot
Shlosha avot,
shnei luchot habrit
echad elokeinu shebashamaim uva'aretz. 

Shmonah mi yode'a
shmonah ani yode'a
shmonah yemei milah
shiv'ah yemei shabatah
Shisha, sidre mishna
Chamisha chumshei torah
arba imahot
Shlosha avot,
shnei luchot habrit
echad elokeinu shebashamaim uva'aretz. 

Tish'ah mi yode'a
tish'ah ani yode'a. 
tish'ah chodshei leidah
shmonah yemei milahshiv'ah yemei shabatah
Shisha, sidre mishna
Chamisha chumshei torah
arba imahot
Shlosha avot,
shnei luchot habrit
echad elokeinu shebashamaim uva'aretz. 

Asara mi yode'a
asara ani yode'a
asara dibraya
tish'ah chodshei leidah
shmonah yemei milah
shiv'ah yemei shabatah
Shisha, sidre mishna
Chamisha chumshei torah
arba imahot
Shlosha avot,
shnei luchot habrit
echad elokeinu shebashamaim uva'aretz. 

Achad asar mi yode'a
achad asar ani yode'a
achad asar kochvaya
asara dibraya
tish'ah chodshei leidah
shmonah yemei milah
shiv'ah yemei shabatah
Shisha, sidre mishna
Chamisha chumshei torah
arba imahot
Shlosha avot,
shnei luchot habrit
echad elokeinu shebashamaim uva'aretz. 

Shneim-asar mi yode'a
shneim-asar ani yode'a
shneim-asar shivtaya
achad asar kochvaya
asara dibraya
tish'ah chodshei leidah
shmonah yemei milah
shiv'ah yemei shabatah
Shisha, sidre mishna
Chamisha chumshei torah
arba imahot
Shlosha avot,
shnei luchot habrit
echad elokeinu shebashamaim uva'aretz. 

Shlosha-asar mi yode'a
Shlosha-asar ani yode'a 
Shlosha-asar midaya
shneim-asar shivtaya
achad asar kochvaya
asara dibraya
tish'ah chodshei leidah
shmonah yemei milah
shiv'ah yemei shabatah
Shisha, sidre mishna
Chamisha chumshei torah
arba imahot
Shlosha avot,
shnei luchot habrit
echad elokeinu shebashamaim uva'aretz.

I KNOW ONE

1 who knows 1
1 I know 1 
1 is Our God who is in the heavens and on earth.

2 who knows 2
2 I know 2 
2 are the tablets of the commandments
1 is Our God who is in the heavens and on earth.

3 who knows 3
3 I know 3 
3 are our forefathers
2 are the tablets of the commandments
1 is Our God who is in the heavens and on earth.

4 who knows 4
4 I know 4 
4 are our matriarchs,
3 are our forefathers
2 are the tablets of the commandments
1 is Our God who is in the heavens and on earth.

5 who knows 5
5 I know 5
5 are the books of the torah,
4 are our matriarchs,
3 are our forefathers
2 are the tablets of the commandments
1 is Our God who is in the heavens and on earth.

6 who knows 6
6 I know 6 
6 are the orders of the mishnah
5 are the books of the torah,
4 are our matriarchs,
3 are our forefathers
2 are the tablets of the commandments
1 is Our God who is in the heavens and on earth.

7 who knows 7
7 I know 7 
7 are the days in a week till Shabbat
6 are the orders of the mishnah
5 are the books of the torah,
4 are our matriarchs,
3 are our forefathers
2 are the tablets of the commandments
1 is Our God who is in the heavens and on earth.

8 who knows 8
8 I know 8 
8 are the days to the brit milah
7 are the days in a week till Shabbat
6 are the orders of the mishnah
5 are the books of the torah,
4 are our matriarchs,
3 are our forefathers
2 are the tablets of the commandments
1 is Our God who is in the heavens and on earth.

9 who knows 9
9 I know 9 
9 are the months before birth,
8 are the days to the brit milah
7 are the days in a week till Shabbat
6 are the orders of the mishnah
5 are the books of the torah,
4 are our matriarchs,
3 are our forefathers
2 are the tablets of the commandments
1 is Our God who is in the heavens and on earth.

10 who knows 10
10 I know 10 
10 are the commandments
9 are the months before birth,
8 are the days to the brit milah
7 are the days in a week till Shabbat
6 are the orders of the mishnah
5 are the books of the torah,
4 are our matriarchs,
3 are our forefathers
2 are the tablets of the commandments
1 is Our God who is in the heavens and on earth.

11 who knows 11
11 I know 11 
11 are the stars in Joseph's dream
10 are the commandments
9 are the months before birth,
8 are the days to the brit milah
7 are the days in a week till Shabbat
6 are the orders of the mishnah
5 are the books of the torah,
4 are our matriarchs,
3 are our forefathers
2 are the tablets of the commandments
1 is Our God who is in the heavens and on earth.

12 who knows 12
12 I know 12 
12 are the Tribes of Israel
11 are the stars in Joseph's dream
10 are the commandments
9 are the months before birth,
8 are the days to the brit milah
7 are the days in a week till Shabbat
6 are the orders of the mishnah
5 are the books of the torah,
4 are our matriarchs,
3 are our forefathers
2 are the tablets of the commandments
1 is Our God who is in the heavens and on earth.

13 who knows 13
13 I know 13 
13 are the attributes of God 
12 are the Tribes of Israel
11 are the stars in Joseph's dream
10 are the commandments
9 are the months before birth,
8 are the days to the brit milah
7 are the days in a week till Shabbat
6 are the orders of the mishnah
5 are the books of the torah,
4 are our matriarchs,
3 are our forefathers
2 are the tablets of the commandments
1 is Our God who is in the heavens and on earth.

Songs
Source : A Growing Haggadah, from the Altabet family tradition

Qualo Es El Uno?

Quien supiense y entendiense, Alavar al Dyo criense, Qualo es el uno, qualo es el uno?

Uno es el Creador, uno es el Creador,

Uno es el Creador, baruch Hu uvaruch sh’mo 

Quien supiense y entendiense, alavar al Dyo criense, Qualo son los dos, qualo son los dos?

Dos Moshe y Aaron, uno es el Creador,

Uno es el Creador, baruch Hu uvaruch sh’mo 

Quien supiense y entendiense, alavar al Dyo criense, Qualo son los tres, qualo son los tres?

Tres muestros padres son, Avraham, Isaac y Yacov, Dos Moshe y Aaron, uno es el Creador, Uno es el Creador, baruch Hu uvaruch sh’mo

Quien supiense y entendiense, alavar al Dyo criense, Qualo son los quatro, qualo son los quatro? Quatro madres de Yisrael, Sarah, Rivkah, Leah, Rachel,

Tres muestros padres son, Avraham, Isaac y Yacov, Dos Moshe y Aaron, uno es el Creador, Uno es el Creador, baruch Hu uvaruch sh’mo

Quien supiense y entendiense, alavar al Dyo criense, Qualo son los cinco, qualo son los cinco?

Cinco livros de la lei,

Quatro madres de Yisrael, Sarah, Rivkah, Leah, Rachel,

Tres muestros padres son, Avraham, Isaac y Yacov, Dos Moshe y Aaron, uno es el Creador, Uno es el Creador, baruch Hu uvaruch sh’mo

Quien supiense y entendiense, alavar al Dyo criense, Qualo son los sesh, qualo son los sesh?

Sesh dias sin Shabat,

Cinco livros de la lei, Quatro madres de Yisrael, Sarah, Rivkah, Leah, Rachel,

Tres muestros padres son, Avraham, Isaac y Yacov, Dos Moshe y Aaron, uno es el Creador, Uno es el Creador, baruch Hu uvaruch sh’mo

Quien supiense y entendiense, alavar al Dyo criense, Qualo son los siete, qualo son los siete?

Siete dias de la semana, Sesh dias sin Shabat, Cinco livros de la lei, Quatro madres de Yisrael, Sarah, Rivkah, Leah, Rachel,

Tres muestros padres son, Avraham, Isaac y Yacov, Dos Moshe y Aaron, uno es el Creador, Uno es el Creador, baruch Hu uvaruch sh’mo

Quien supiense y entendiense, alavar al Dyo criense, Qualo son los ocho, qualo son los ocho?

Ocho dias de brit mila, Siete dias de la semana, Sesh dias sin Shabat, Cinco livros de la lei, Quatro madres de Yisrael, Sarah, Rivkah, Leah, Rachel,

Tres muestros padres son, Avraham, Isaac y Yacov, Dos Moshe y Aaron, uno es el Creador, Uno es el Creador, baruch Hu uvaruch sh’mo

Quien supiense y entendiense, alavar al Dyo criense, Qualo son los mueve, qualo son los mueve?

Mueve mezes de la prenyada,

Ocho dias de brit mila, Siete dias de la semana, Sesh dias sin Shabat, Cinco livros de la lei, Quatro madres de Yisrael, Sarah, Rivkah, Leah, Rachel,

Tres muestros padres son, Avraham, Isaac y Yacov, Dos Moshe y Aaron, uno es el Creador, Uno es el Creador, baruch Hu uvaruch sh’mo

Quien supiense y entendiense, alavar al Dyo criense, Qualo son los diez, qualo son los diez?

Diez comandamientos de la lei,

Mueve mezes de la prenyada,

Ocho dias de brit mila, Siete dias de la semana, Sesh dias sin Shabat, Cinco livros de la lei, Quatro madres de Yisrael, Sarah, Rivkah, Leah, Rachel,

Tres muestros padres son, Avraham, Isaac y Yacov, Dos Moshe y Aaron, uno es el Creador, Uno es el Creador, baruch Hu uvaruch sh’mo

Quien supiense y entendiense, alavar al Dyo criense, Qualo son los once, qualo son los once?

Once estrellas de sueno de Yossef,

Diez comandamientos de la lei,

Mueve mezes de la prenyada,

Ocho dias de brit mila, Siete dias de la semana, Sesh dias sin Shabat, Cinco livros de la lei, Quatro madres de Yisrael, Sarah, Rivkah, Leah, Rachel,

Tres muestros padres son, Avraham, Isaac y Yacov, Dos Moshe y Aaron, uno es el Creador, Uno es el Creador, baruch Hu uvaruch sh’mo

Quien supiense y entendiense, alavar al Dyo criense, Qualo son los doce, qualo son los doce?

Doce trivos de Yisrael,

Once estrellas de sueno de Yossef,

Diez comandamientos de la lei,

Mueve mezes de la prenyada,

Ocho dias de brit mila, Siete dias de la semana, Sesh dias sin Shabat, Cinco livros de la lei, Quatro madres de Yisrael, Sarah, Rivkah, Leah, Rachel,

Tres muestros padres son, Avraham, Isaac y Yacov, Dos Moshe y Aaron, uno es el Creador, Uno es el Creador, baruch Hu uvaruch sh’mo

Quien supiense y entendiense, alavar al Dyo criense, Qualo son los treize, qualo son los trece?

Trece anyos de complas minyan, Doce trivos de Yisrael, Once estrellas de sueno de Yossef,

Diez comandamientos de la lei,

Mueve mezes de la prenyada,

Ocho dias de brit mila, Siete dias de la semana, Sesh dias sin Shabat, Cinco livros de la lei, Quatro madres de Yisrael, Sarah, Rivkah, Leah, Rachel,

Tres muestros padres son, Avraham, Isaac y Yacov, Dos Moshe y Aaron, uno es el Creador, Uno es el Creador, baruch Hu uvaruch sh’mo