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Introduction
Source : African American Spiritual

When Israel was in Egypt’s land, Let My people go;
Oppressed so hard they could not stand, Let My people go;
Go down, Moses, way down in Egypt’s land,
Tell old Pharaoh: Let My people go.

The Lord told Moses what to do, Let My people go;
To lead the children of Israel through, Let My people go.
Go down, Moses, way down in Egypt’s land,
Tell old Pharaoh: Let My people go.

The pillar of cloud shall clear the way, Let My people go;
A fire by night, a shade by day, Let My people go.
Go down, Moses, way down in Egypt’s land,
Tell old Pharaoh: Let My people go.

Come, Moses, you'll not be lost, Let My people go;
stretch out your rod and come across, Let My people go.
Go down, Moses, way down in Egypt’s land,
Tell old Pharaoh: Let My people go.

As Israel stood by the water-side, Let My people go;
At God’s command it did divide, Let My people go.
Go down, Moses, way down in Egypt’s land,
Tell old Pharaoh: Let My people go.

When they had reached the other shore, Let My people go;
They dang the song of triumph over, Let My people go.
Go down, Moses, way down in Egypt’s land,
Tell old Pharaoh: Let My people go.

Introduction
Source : various

Contrary to what we may have been taught to think,

unnecessary and unchosen suffering wounds us but need not

scar us for life. It does mark us. What we allow the mark of our

suffering to become is in our own hands.”–bell hooks

The Hebrew word "Haggadah" means "The Telling." It is through the stories that we tell that we build our understanding of the world, of who we are, of the nature of Truth. The very identities that each of us hold as "ourselves" are really a collection of personal stories that we believe about ourselves. Through the experience of Pesach, we add to our personal narrative, the story of the redemption of our people. We hold in our deepest heart of hearts the Truth that the miracle of Redemption from suffering is possible for each and every one of us, because it happened to us—to "me"—in Egypt all those years ago.

Introduction

The Order of the Seder:

The word Seder means order. Tonight's ritual is performed in a specific order, as it has been for thousands of years. The steps represent the Shir Ha'ma’alos in Psalms - the fifteen songs of ascent. Our Seder follows a fifteen-step ascent.

The SEDER of the SEDER

Kadesh - We say the Kiddush - the first cup of wine

Ur'chatz - We wash our hands

Karpas - We dip a vegetable in salt water, and say a blessing

Yachatz - We break the middle matzah, and hide the larger half, the Afikomen

Maggid - We tell the story of Passover, including the four questions, and the second cup of wine

Rachtzah - We wash our hands with a blessing

Motzi - We say the blessing for bread

Matzah - We say the blessing for matzah

Maror - We dip bitter herbs in charoset, and say a blessing

Korech - We eat a sandwich of matzah and bitter herbs

Shulchan Orech - We eat the festive meal

Tzafoon - We eat the Afikomen

Barech - We say the blessings after the meal, say the blessing over the third cup of wine. We welcome Elijah, the prophet

Hallel - We sing songs of praise

Nirtzah - We complete our Seder, praying that G-d accepts our service

Kadesh
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

All Jewish celebrations, from holidays to weddings, include wine as a symbol of our joy – not to mention a practical way to increase that joy. The seder starts with wine and then gives us three more opportunities to refill our cup and drink.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who chose us from all peoples and languages, and sanctified us with commandments, and lovingly gave to us special times for happiness, holidays and this time of celebrating the Holiday of Matzah, the time of liberation, reading our sacred stories, and remembering the Exodus from Egypt. For you chose us and sanctified us among all peoples. And you have given us joyful holidays. We praise God, who sanctifies the people of Israel and the holidays.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם
 שֶׁהֶחֱיָנוּ וְקִיְּמָנוּ וְהִגִּיעָנוּ לַזְּמַן הַזֶּה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam,
she-hechiyanu v’key’manu v’higiyanu lazman hazeh.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything,
who has kept us alive, raised us up, and brought us to this happy moment.

Drink the first glass of wine!

Urchatz
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com
Water is refreshing, cleansing, and clear, so it’s easy to understand why so many cultures and religions use water for symbolic purification. We will wash our hands twice during our seder: now, with no blessing, to get us ready for the rituals to come; and then again later, we’ll wash again with a blessing, preparing us for the meal, which Judaism thinks of as a ritual in itself. (The Jewish obsession with food is older than you thought!)

To wash your hands, you don’t need soap, but you do need a cup to pour water over your hands. Pour water on each of your hands three times, alternating between your hands. If the people around your table don’t want to get up to walk all the way over to the sink, you could pass a pitcher and a bowl around so everyone can wash at their seats… just be careful not to spill!

Too often during our daily lives we don’t stop and take the moment to prepare for whatever it is we’re about to do.

Let's pause to consider what we hope to get out of our evening together tonight. Go around the table and share one hope or expectation you have for tonight's seder.

Karpas
Source : various

Passover, like many of our holidays, combines the celebration of an event from our Jewish memory with a recognition of the cycles of nature. As we remember the liberation from Egypt, we also recognize the stirrings of spring and rebirth happening in the world around us. The symbols on our table bring together elements of both kinds of celebration.

We now take the parsley, representing our joy at the dawning of spring after our long, cold winter and dip it in salt water, a symbol of the tears our ancestors shed as slaves. Before we eat it, we recite a short blessing:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הָאֲדָמָה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree ha-adama.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruits of the earth.

Deepen and broaden my senses

To absorb a fresh

Green, flowering world,

To take from it the secret

Of blossoming silence.

Yachatz
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

There are three pieces of matzah stacked on the table. We now break the middle matzah into two pieces. The host should wrap up the larger of the pieces and, at some point between now and the end of dinner, hide it. This piece is called the afikomen, literally “dessert” in Greek. After dinner, the guests will have to hunt for the afikomen in order to wrap up the meal… and win a prize.

We eat matzah in memory of the quick flight of our ancestors from Egypt. As slaves, they had faced many false starts before finally being let go. So when the word of their freedom came, they took whatever dough they had and ran with it before it had the chance to rise, leaving it looking something like matzah.

Uncover and hold up the three pieces of matzah and say:

This is the bread of poverty which our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt. All who are hungry, come and eat; all who are needy, come and celebrate Passover with us. This year we are here; next year we will be in Israel. This year we are slaves; next year we will be free.

These days, matzah is a special food and we look forward to eating it on Passover. Imagine eating only matzah, or being one of the countless people around the world who don’t have enough to eat.

What does the symbol of matzah say to us about oppression in the world, both people literally enslaved and the many ways in which each of us is held down by forces beyond our control? How does this resonate with events happening now?

Maggid - Beginning
Source : Arundhati Roy Quote, Design by Haggadot.com

-- Four Questions
Source : JewishBoston.com

The formal telling of the story of Passover is framed as a discussion with lots of questions and answers. The tradition that the youngest person asks the questions reflects the centrality of involving everyone in the seder. The rabbis who created the set format for the seder gave us the Four Questions to help break the ice in case no one had their own questions. Asking questions is a core tradition in Jewish life. If everyone at your seder is around the same age, perhaps the person with the least seder experience can ask them – or everyone can sing them all together.

מַה נִּשְׁתַּנָּה הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה מִכָּל הַלֵּילות

Ma nishtana halaila hazeh mikol haleilot?

Why is this night different from all other nights?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכלין חָמֵץ וּמַצָּה  הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה כֻּלּוֹ מצה  

Shebichol haleilot anu ochlin chameitz u-matzah. Halaila hazeh kulo matzah.

On all other nights we eat both leavened bread and matzah.
Tonight we only eat matzah.

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכְלִין שְׁאָר יְרָקוֹת הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה מָרוֹר

Shebichol haleilot anu ochlin shi’ar yirakot haleila hazeh maror.

On all other nights we eat all kinds of vegetables,
but tonight we eat bitter herbs.

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אֵין אָֽנוּ מַטְבִּילִין אֲפִילוּ פַּֽעַם אחָת  הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה שְׁתֵּי פְעמים

Shebichol haleilot ain anu matbilin afilu pa-am echat. Halaila hazeh shtei fi-amim.

On all other nights we aren’t expected to dip our vegetables one time.
Tonight we do it twice.

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכְלִין בֵּין יוֹשְׁבִין וּבֵין מְסֻבִּין.  :הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה כֻּלָּֽנוּ מְסֻבין

Shebichol haleilot anu ochlin bein yoshvin uvein m’subin. Halaila hazeh kulanu m’subin.

On all other nights we eat either sitting normally or reclining.
Tonight we recline.

-- Four Children

The Torah refers to four sons: One wise, one wicked, one simple and one who does not know how to ask a question. For our purposes, we’ll talk about four children.

The Wise Child asks:  What are the testimonials, statutes, and laws our God commanded us?

You should teacher her the laws and rituals of Pesach so that she may one day pass that knowledge too.

The Wicked Child asks:  What does this drudgery mean to YOU?

To you and not to him. Since he excludes himself from the community, you should say to him: "It is how I thank God for what God did for me when I left Egypt."

The Simple Child asks:  What is this?

You should say to her, "With a strong hand God took us out of Egypt, where we were slaves."

For the Child that doesn't yet know how to ask, say

“It is because of what God did for me in taking me about of Egypt.” 

Tell him the Passover story. 

-- Exodus Story
Maggid By Marge Piercy

The courage to let go of the door, the handle. The courage to shed the familiar walls whose very stains and leaks are comfortable as the little moles of the upper arm; stains that recall a feast, a child’s naughtiness, a loud blistering storm that slapped the roof hard, pouring through.

The courage to abandon the graves dug into the hill, the small bones of children and the brittle bones of the old whose marrow hunger had stolen; the courage to desert the tree planted and only begun to bear; the riverside where promises were shaped; the street where their empty pots were broken.

The courage to leave the place whose language you learned as early as your own, whose customs however dangerous or demeaning, bind you like a halter you have learned to pull inside, to move your load; the land fertile with the blood spilled on it; the roads mapped and annotated for survival.

The courage to walk out of the pain that is known into the pain that cannot be imagined, mapless, walking into the wilderness, going barefoot with a canteen into the desert; stuffed in the stinking hold of a rotting ship sailing off the map into dragons’ mouths.

Cathay, India, Serbia, goldeneh medina, leaving bodies by the way like abandoned treasure. So they walked out of Egypt. So they bribed their way out of Russia under loaves of straw; so they steamed out of the bloody smoking charnelhouse of Europe on overloaded freighters forbidden all ports–

out of pain into death or freedom or a different painful dignity, into squalor and politics. We Jews are all born of wanderers, with shoes under our pillows and a memory of blood that is ours raining down. We honor only those Jews who changed tonight, those who chose the desert over bondage,

who walked into the strange and became strangers and gave birth to children who could look down on them standing on their shoulders for having been slaves. We honor those who let go of everything but freedom, who ran, who revolted, who fought, who became other by saving themselves.

-- Ten Plagues
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

As we rejoice at our deliverance from slavery, we acknowledge that our freedom was hard-earned. We regret that our freedom came at the cost of the Egyptians’ suffering, for we are all human beings made in the image of God. We pour out a drop of wine for each of the plagues as we recite them.

Dip a finger or a spoon into your wine glass for a drop for each plague.

These are the ten plagues which God brought down on the Egyptians:

Blood | dam | דָּם

Frogs | tzfardeiya |  צְפַרְדֵּֽעַ

Lice | kinim | כִּנִּים

Beasts | arov | עָרוֹב

Cattle disease | dever | דֶּֽבֶר

Boils | sh’chin | שְׁחִין

Hail | barad | בָּרָד

Locusts | arbeh | אַרְבֶּה

Darkness | choshech | חֹֽשֶׁךְ

Death of the Firstborn | makat b’chorot | מַכַּת בְּכוֹרוֹת

The Egyptians needed ten plagues because after each one they were able to come up with excuses and explanations rather than change their behavior. Could we be making the same mistakes? Make up your own list. What are the plagues in your life? What are the plagues in our world today? What behaviors do we need to change to fix them? 

-- Ten Plagues
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

בְּכָל־דּוֹר וָדוֹר חַיָּב אָדָם לִרְאוֹת אֶת־עַצְמוֹ, כְּאִלּוּ הוּא יָצָא מִמִּצְרָֽיִם

B’chol dor vador chayav adam lirot et-atzmo, k’ilu hu yatzav mimitzrayim.

In every generation, everyone is obligated to see themselves as though they personally left Egypt.

The seder reminds us that it was not only our ancestors whom God redeemed; God redeemed us too along with them. That’s why the Torah says “God brought us out from there in order to lead us to and give us the land promised to our ancestors.”

---

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who redeemed us and our ancestors from Egypt, enabling us to reach this night and eat matzah and bitter herbs. May we continue to reach future holidays in peace and happiness.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the second glass of wine!

-- Ten Plagues

The ritual of Miriam’s Cup has emerged as another way to honor women during the seder. Miriam’s Cup builds upon the message of the orange, transforming the seder into an empowering and inclusive experience. Although Miriam, a prophet and the sister of Moses, is never mentioned in the traditional Haggadah text, she is one of the central figures in the Exodus story.

Miriam has long been associated with water. The rabbis attribute to Miriam the miraculous well that traveled with the Israelites throughout their wandering in the desert that ensured their survival. In the Book of Numbers, the well dries up immediately following Miriam’s death. Of course, water played a role in Miriam’s life from the first time we meet her, watching over the infant Moses on the Nile, through her triumphant crossing of the Red Sea.

Raise Miriam’s empty goblet and say:

Miriam's cup is filled with water, rather than wine. I invite women and men of all generations at our Seder table to fill Miriam's cup with water from their own glasses.

Pass Miriam's cup around the table and have everyone fill it with a little water from his or her own cup.

Like Miriam, Jewish women in all generations have been essential for the continuity of our people. As keepers of traditions in the home, women passed down songs and stories, rituals and recipes, from mother to daughter, from generation to generation. Let us each fill the cup of Miriam with water from our own glasses, so that our daughters may continue to draw from the strength and wisdom of our heritage.

When Miriam's cup is filled, raise the goblet and say:

We place Miriam's cup on our Seder table to honor the important role of Jewish women in our tradition and history, whose stories have been too sparingly told.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

One of most beloved songs in the Passover seder is "Dayenu."

The word "Dayenu" means approximately "it would have been enough for us", "it would have been sufficient", or "it would have sufficed" ( day in Hebrew is "enough", and -enu the first person plural suffix, "to us"). The song is about being grateful to God for all of the gifts he gave the Jewish people, such as taking them out of slavery, giving them the Torah and Shabbat, and had God only given one of the gifts, it would have still been enough. This is to show much greater appreciation for all of them as a whole.

A few of us will read the stanzas one at a time, and the everyone else will respond, "Dayenu" – meaning, It would have been enough.

If He had brought us out from Egypt, and had not carried out judgments against them...

Dayenu!

If He had carried out judgments against them, and not against their idols...

Dayenu!

If He had destroyed their idols, and had not smitten their first-born...

Dayenu!

If He had smote their first-born, and had not given us their wealth...

Dayenu!

If He had given us their wealth, and had not split the sea for us...

Dayenu!

If He had split the sea for us, and had not taken us through it on dry land...

Dayenu!

If He had taken us through the sea on dry land, and had not drowned our oppressors in it...

Dayenu!

If He had drowned our oppressors in it, and had not supplied our needs in the desert for forty years...

Dayenu!

If He had supplied our needs in the desert for forty years, and had not fed us the manna...

Dayenu!

If He had fed us the manna, and had not given us the Shabbat...

Dayenu!

If He had given us the Shabbat, and had not brought us before Mount Sinai...

Dayenu!

If He had brought us before Mount Sinai, and had not given us the Torah...

Dayenu!

If He had given us the Torah, and had not brought us into the land of Israel...

Dayenu!

If He had brought us into the land of Israel, and had not built for us the the Holy Temple...

Dayenu!

IT WOULD HAVE BEEN ENOUGH!

Fun Fact: Persian and Afghani Jews hit each other over the heads and shoulders with scallions every time they say Dayenu ! They especially use the scallions in the ninth stanza which mentions the manna that the Israelites ate everyday in the desert, because Torah tells us that the Israelites began to complain about the manna and longed for the onions, leeks and garlic.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : www.funnyordie.com

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : http://zemerl.com/cgi-bin/show.pl?title=Dayenu

Ilu ho-tsi, ho-tsi-a-nu, 
Ho-tsi-a-nu mi-Mitz-ra-yim, 
Ho-tsi-a-nu mi-Mitz-ra-yim, 
Da-ye-nu!

.. CHORUS: 
.. Dai, da-ye-nu, 
.. Dai, da-ye-nu, 
.. Dai, da-ye-nu, 
.. Da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu! 
.. 
.. Dai, da-ye-nu, 
.. Dai, da-ye-nu, 
.. Dai, da-ye-nu, 
.. Da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu!

Ilu na-tan, na-tan la-nu, 
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-Sha-bat, 
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-Sha-bat, 
Da-ye-nu!

.. (CHORUS)

Ilu na-tan, na-tan la-nu, 
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-To-rah, 
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-To-rah, 
Da-ye-nu!

.. (CHORUS) 

Motzi-Matzah
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

We have now told the story of Passover…but wait! We’re not quite done. There are still some symbols on our seder plate we haven’t talked about yet. Rabban Gamliel would say that whoever didn’t explain the shank bone, matzah, and marror (or bitter herbs) hasn’t done Passover justice.

The shank bone represents the Pesach, the special lamb sacrifice made in the days of the Temple for the Passover holiday. It is called the pesach, from the Hebrew word meaning “to pass over,” because God passed over the houses of our ancestors in Egypt when visiting plagues upon our oppressors.

The matzah reminds us that when our ancestors were finally free to leave Egypt, there was no time to pack or prepare. Our ancestors grabbed whatever dough was made and set out on their journey, letting their dough bake into matzah as they fled.

The bitter herbs provide a visceral reminder of the bitterness of slavery, the life of hard labor our ancestors experienced in Egypt.

Motzi-Matzah
Source : JewishBoston.com

The blessing over the meal and matzah | motzi matzah | מוֹצִיא מַצָּה

The familiar hamotzi blessing marks the formal start of the meal. Because we are using matzah instead of bread, we add a blessing celebrating this mitzvah.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, הַמּוֹצִיא לֶֽחֶם מִן הָאָֽרֶץ

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, hamotzi lechem min ha-aretz.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who brings bread from the land.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתַָיו וְצִוָּֽנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מַצָּה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat matzah.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to eat matzah.

Distribute and eat the top and middle matzah for everyone to eat.

Maror
Source : Original

Dipping the bitter herb in sweet charoset |  maror   |מָרוֹר   

We recognize that even though we are so grateful for our journeys toward liberation, and that we experience so much joy through the process of freeing ourselves, there are also many parts of the journey that are difficult and unpleasant.

We acknowledge the mixture of pleasant and unpleasant experiences by mixing bitter and sweet flavors as we eat the maror with charoset.

ברוּךְ אַתָּה יְיַָ אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָּֽנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מרוֹר:

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat maror.

Maror

The Real Story

In the early 1980s, the Hillel Foundation invited me to speak on a panel at Oberlin College. While on campus, I came across a Haggada that had been written by some Oberlin students to express feminist concerns. One ritual they devised was placing a crust of bread on the Seder plate, as a sign of solidarity with Jewish lesbians ("there's as much room for a lesbian in Judaism as there is for a crust of bread on the Seder plate").

At the next Passover, I placed an orange on our family's Seder plate. During the first part of the Seder, I asked everyone to take a segment of the orange, make the blessing over fruit, and eat it as a gesture of solidarity with Jewish lesbians and gay men, and others who are marginalized within the Jewish community (I mentioned widows in particular).

Bread on the Seder plate brings an end to Pesach - it renders everything chametz..." leavened."  And its symbolism suggests that being lesbian is being transgressive, violating Judaism. I felt that an orange was suggestive of something else: the fruitfulness for all Jews when lesbians and gay men are contributing and active members of Jewish life. In addition, each orange segment had a few seeds that had to be spit out - a gesture of spitting out, repudiating the homophobia that poisons too many Jews.

When lecturing, I often mentioned my custom as one of many new feminist rituals that had been developed in the last twenty years. Somehow, though, the typical patriarchal maneuver occurred: My idea of an orange and my intention of affirming lesbians and gay men were transformed. Now the story circulates that a MAN stood up after I lecture I delivered and said to me, in anger, that a woman belongs on the bimah "pulpit" as much as an orange on the Seder plate.

My idea, a woman's words, are attributed to a man, and the affirmation of lesbians and gay men is simply erased. Isn't that precisely what's happened over the centuries to women's ideas?

Susannah Heschel, April, 2001

Koreich

“If I am not for myself, who will be for me?
If I am not for others, what am I?
And if not now, when?”

"That which is hateful to you, do not do to another.
That is the whole Law.
The rest is commentary."

“I get up.
I walk.
I fall down.
Meanwhile, I keep dancing.”

-Hillel the Elder

These are three quotes famously attributed to the sage Hillel, one of Judaism's most important figures.

Sitting at the festive Passover service, the “seder,” we eat some bitter herbs to remind us of the enslavement of the Jewish nation in Egypt. However, Hillel did not eat the bitter herbs separately. Nor did he eat the matzah alone. Instead, he would make a sandwich combining the bitter and the sweet, and eat it while reclining to the left (like Beyonce) to represent our freedom. To commemorate Hillel’s sandwich (“korech”), Jews do the same today, eating the Hillel sandwich while reclining.

Hillel was a remarkable man. He viewed the bitter parts of his life, particularly the hardships of poverty that G‑d bestowed upon him, positively. When his life appeared difficult, he understood it as God’s will and ultimately his suffering was an opportunity to find sweetness. Thus, Hillel placed the bitterness (bitter herbs) against the sweetness of freedom (matzah and charoset ) and ate it while reclining.

Shulchan Oreich
Tzafun
Source : JewishBoston.com

Finding and eating the Afikomen | tzafoon | צָפוּן

The playfulness of finding the afikomen reminds us that we balance our solemn memories of slavery with a joyous celebration of freedom. As we eat the afikomen, our last taste of matzah for the evening, we are grateful for moments of silliness and happiness in our lives.

Bareich

We now say grace after the meal, thanking God for the food we’ve eaten, an extended toast to God. As it says in the Torah: When you have eaten and are satisfied, give praise to your God who has given you this good earth. We now praise God for the earth and for its sustenance:

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, whose goodness sustains the world. You are the origin of love and compassion, the source of bread for all. Thanks to You, we need never lack for food; You provide food enough for everyone. We praise God, source of food for everyone. May the source of peace grant peace to us, to the Jewish people, and to the entire world.

Amen.

Now, we pour a THIRD glass of wine and bless that:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the third glass!

Bareich

i Thank You God for most this amazing

by e.e. cummings

i thank You God for most this amazing

day: for the leaping greenly spirits of trees

and a blue true dream of sky; and for everything

which is natural which is infinite which is yes

(i who have died am alive again today,

and this is the sun's birthday; this is the birth

day of life and of love and wings: and of the gay

great happening illimitably earth)

how should tasting touching hearing seeing

breathing any--lifted from the no

of all nothing--human merely being

doubt unimaginable You?

(now the ears of my ears awake and

now the eyes of my eyes are opened)

Hallel

Singing songs of praise for God | hallel | הַלֵּל

Some sing traditional prayers from the Book of Psalms. Others, favorites like Chad Gadya and Who Knows One. Or, songs from the civil rights movement to celebrate freedom. Or maybe parody lyrics about Passover set to the tunes from a musical. We’re at least three glasses of wine in, about to be four…roll with it.

Fourth Glass

As we come to the end of the seder, we drink one more glass of wine.

With this final cup, we give thanks for the experience of celebrating Passover together, for the traditions that help inform our daily lives and guide our actions and aspirations.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן:

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

DRINK!

and...

SING!

Hallel

We now refill our wine glasses one last time and open the front door to invite the prophet Elijah to join our seder.

At the end of his life, rather than dying, he was whisked away to heaven. Tradition holds that he will return in advance of messianic days to herald a new era of peace, so we set a place for Elijah at many joyous, hopeful Jewish occasions, such as a baby’s bris and the Passover seder.

We sing to welcome him to the table.

Hallel
Source : http://www.lyricszoo.com/warren-byrd/eliyahu-hanavi/

ELIYAHU HANAVI

Transliteration

Eliyahu haNavi
Eliyahu haTishbi,
Eliyahu haGil'adi –

Bim'hera v'yameinu yavoh eleinu,
im mashiach ach ben David. (x2)

ELIJAH THE PROPHET

English Translation

Elijah the prophet
Elijah the Tishbite, (stranger in a strange land / foreigner)
Elijah the Giladite - (hill of testimony / mound of witness)

In haste and in our days may he come to us
with Messiah son of David. (x2)

Songs
Source : various

One little goat, one little goat.
That Father bought for two zuzim,
Chad gadya, chad gadya.

Then came a cat
and ate the goat,
That Father bought for two zuzim,
Chad gadya, chad gadya.

Then came a dog
and bit the cat,
that ate the goat,
That Father bought for two zuzim,
Chad gadya, chad gadya.

Then came a stick
and beat the dog,
that bit the cat,
that ate the goat,
That Father bought for two zuzim,
Chad gadya, chad gadya.

Then came fire
and burnt the stick,
that beat the dog,
that bit the cat,
that ate the goat,
That Father bought for two zuzim,
Chad gadya, chad gadya.

Then came water
and quenched the fire,
that burnt the stick,
that beat the dog,
that bit the cat,
that ate the goat,
That Father bought for two zuzim,
Chad gadya, chad gadya.

Then came the ox
and drank the water,
that quenched the fire,
that burnt the stick,
that beat the dog,
that bit the cat,
that ate the goat,
That Father bought for two zuzim,
Chad gadya, chad gadya.

Then came the slaughterer
and slaughtered the ox,
that drank the water,
that quenched the fire,
that burnt the stick,
that beat the dog,
that bit the cat,
that ate the goat,
That Father bought for two zuzim,
Chad gadya, chad gadya.

Then came the Angel of Death
and killed the slaughterer,
that slaughtered the ox,
that drank the water,
that quenched the fire,
that burnt the stick,
that beat the dog,
that bit the cat,
that ate the goat,
That Father bought for two zuzim,
Chad gadya, chad gadya.

Then came the Holy One, Blessed be He
and slew the the Angel of Death,
that killed the slaughterer,
that slaughtered the ox,
that drank the water,
that quenched the fire,
that burnt the stick,
that beat the dog,
that bit the cat,
that ate the goat,
That Father bought for two zuzim,
Chad gadya, chad gadya.

Songs
Source : Time of Israel

Songs

Who knows one ?

Who knows one?  I know one!

One is Hashem ! One is Hashem ! One is Hashem !

In the heaven and the earth. ooh ah ooh ah ah , ooh ah ooh ah ah

Who knows two?  I know two!

Two are the tablets that Moses brought.

and One is Hashem ! One is Hashem ! One is Hashem !

In the heaven and the earth. ooh ah ooh ah ah , ooh ah ooh ah ah

Who knows three?  I know three !

Three are the papas,

Two are the tablets that Moses brought.

and One is Hashem ! One is Hashem ! One is Hashem !

In the heaven and the earth. ooh ah ooh ah ah , ooh ah ooh ah ah

Who knows four?  I know four !

Four are the Mommas,

Three are the papas,

Two are the tablets that Moses brought.

and One is Hashem ! One is Hashem ! One is Hashem !

In the heaven and the earth. ooh ah ooh ah ah , ooh ah ooh ah ah

Who knows five?  I now five!

Five are the books of the Torah (clap)

Four are the Mommas,

Three are the papas,

Two are the tablets that Moses brought.

and One is Hashem ! One is Hashem ! One is Hashem !

In the heaven and the earth. ooh ah ooh ah ah , ooh ah ooh ah ah

Who knows six? I know six!

Six are the books of the, Mishna (clap)

Five are the books of the Torah (clap)

Four are the Mommas,

Three are the papas,

Two are the tablets that Moses brought.

and One is Hashem ! One is Hashem ! One is Hashem !

In the heaven and the earth. ooh ah ooh ah ah , ooh ah ooh ah ah

Who knows seven? I know seven !

Seven are the days of the week. (snip, snip)

Six are the books of the, Mishna (clap)

Five are the books of the Torah (clap)

Four are the Mommas, Three are the papas,

Two are the tablets that Moses brought.

and One is Hashem ! One is Hashem ! One is Hashem ! In the heaven and the earth. ooh ah ooh ah ah , ooh ah ooh ah ah

Who knows eight? I know eight !

Eight are the days of the Bris (snip, snip )

Seven are the days of the week. (clap,clap)

Six are the books of the, Mishna (clap)

Five are the books of the Torah (clap)

Four are the Mommas,

Three are the papas,

Two are the tablets that Moses brought.

and One is Hashem ! One is Hashem ! One is Hashem !

In the heaven and the earth. ooh ah ooh ah ah , ooh ah ooh ah ahTwo are the tablets that Moses brought.

Who knows nine ?  I know nine !

Nine are the months before a baby’s born.

Eight are the days of the Bris (snip, snip)

Seven are the days of the week. (clap,clap)

Six are the books of the, Mishna (clap)

Five are the books of the Torah (clap)

Four are the Mommas,

Three are the papas,

Two are the tablets that Moses brought.

and One is Hashem ! One is Hashem ! One is Hashem !

In the heaven and the earth. ooh ah ooh ah ah , ooh ah ooh ah ah

Who knows ten ?  I know ten !

Ten are the Diiiiiivine commandments (hands in the air!)

Nine are the months before a baby’s born.

Eight are the days of the Bris (snip, snip )

Seven are the days of the week. (clap,clap)

Six are the books of the, Mishna ( (clap)

Five are the books of the Torah (clap)

Four are the Mommas,

Three are the papas,

Two are the tablets that Moses brought.

and One is Hashem ! One is Hashem ! One is Hashem !

In the heaven and the earth. ooh ah ooh ah ah , ooh ah ooh ah ah

Who knows Eleven ? I know eleven !

Eleven are the stars in Yosef’s dream

Ten are the Diiiiivine Commandments (hands in the air!)

Nine are the months before a baby’s born.

Eight are the days of the Bris ( snip , snip )

Seven are the days of the week. (clap,clap)

Six are the books of the, Mishna (clap)

Five are the books of the Torah (clap)

Four are the Mommas,

Three are the papas,

Two are the tablets that Moses brought.

and One is Hashem ! One is Hashem ! One is Hashem !

In the heaven and the earth. ooh ah ooh ah ah , ooh ah ooh ah ah

Who knows Twelve?  I know twelve !

Twelve are the tribes of Israel.

Eleven are the stars in Yosef’s dream

Ten are the Diiiiiivine Commandments (hands in the air!)

Nine are the months before a baby’s born.

Eight are the days of the Bris ( snip, snip )

Seven are the days of the week. (clap,clap)

Six are the books of the, Mishna (clap)

Five are the books of the Torah (clap)

Four are the Mommas,

Three are the papas,

Two are the tablets that Moses brought.

and One is Hashem ! One is Hashem ! One is Hashem !

In the heaven and the earth. ooh ah ooh ah ah , ooh ah ooh ah ah

Who knows thirteen?  I know thirteen !

Thirteen are the ways that God is good.

Twelve are the tribes of Israel.

Eleven are the stars in Yosef’s dream

Ten are the Diiiiiiiivine Commmandments (hands in the air!)

Nine are the months before a baby’s born.

Eight are the days of the Bris ( snip , snip )

Seven are the days of the week. (clap,clap)

Six are the books of the, Mishna (clap)

Five are the books of the Torah (clap)

Four are the Mommas,

Three are the papas,

Two are the tablets that Moses brought.

and One is Hashem ! One is Hashem ! One is Hashem !

In the heaven and the earth!

Songs
Source : Frozen

(sung loosely to the tune of Let it Go)

The sand burns hot in the desert tonight

The foot prints of my people can be seen

A kingdom of subjugation under Pharaoh who is mean

Our people built his temples and pyramids to the sky

Oh dear lord hear our people’s cry...

Let us go, let us go

Can’t hold us back any more

Let us go, let us go.

Find someone else to do your chores

Elohim, adoni hear us pray,

Lets pack our things

The desert never bothered us anyway

It’s funny how some distance

makes Egyptians all seems small and the masters that controlled us can’t get to us at all

It’s time to see what we can do

The power of a people who’ve broken through

Torah v emet the laws for me.

We’re free.

Let us go, let us go.

We are one with the lord

Let us go, let us go.

We hope this Seder didn’t make you bored

So here we’ll sit and here we’ll stay

Let the Seder go on

The Maror never bothers me anyway...

by Hillary Goldberg

Songs
Source : Bob Marley

Old pirates, yes, they rob I;
Sold I to the merchant ships,
Minutes after they took I
From the bottomless pit.
But my hand was made strong
By the 'and of the Almighty.
We forward in this generation
Triumphantly.
Won't you help to sing
These songs of freedom? -
'Cause all I ever have:
Redemption songs;
Redemption songs.

Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery;
None but ourselves can free our minds.
Have no fear for atomic energy,
'Cause none of them can stop the time.
How long shall they kill our prophets,
While we stand aside and look? Ooh!
Some say it's just a part of it:
We've got to fulfil de book.

Won't you help to sing
These songs of freedom? -
'Cause all I ever have:
Redemption songs;
Redemption songs;
Redemption songs.

[Guitar break]

Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery;
None but ourselves can free our mind.
Wo! Have no fear for atomic energy,
'Cause none of them-a can-a stop-a the time.
How long shall they kill our prophets,
While we stand aside and look?
Yes, some say it's just a part of it:
We've got to fulfill the book.
Won't you help to sing
These songs of freedom? -
'Cause all I ever had:
Redemption songs -
All I ever had:
Redemption songs:
These songs of freedom,
Songs of freedom.

Songs

One love! One heart!
Let's get together and feel all right.
Hear the children cryin' (One love!)
Hear the children cryin' (One heart!),
Sayin' give thanks and praise to the Lord and I will feel all right,
Sayin' let's get together and feel all right.

Let them all pass all their dirty remarks (One love!)
There is one question I'd really love to ask (One heart!)
Is there a place for the hopeless sinners,
Who has hurt all mankind just to save his own beliefs?

One love! What about the one heart? One heart!
What about, people? Let's get together and feel all right
As it was in the beginning (One love!)
So shall it be in the end (One heart!),
All right! Give thanks and praise to the Lord and I will feel all right,
Let's get together and feel all right, one more thing!

Let's get together to fight this Holy Armagiddyon (One love!),
So when the Man comes there will be no, no doom (One song!).
Have pity on those whose chances grows t'inner;
There ain't no hiding place from the Father of Creation.

Sayin', One love! What about the one heart? (One heart!)
What about the ? Let's get together and feel all right.
I'm pleadin' to mankind! (One love!)
Oh, Lord! (One heart) Whoa!

Give thanks and praise to the Lord and I will feel all right,
Let's get together and feel all right.
Give thanks and praise to the Lord and I will feel all right,
Let's get together and feel all right.


Read more: Bob Marley - One Love / People Get Ready Lyrics | MetroLyrics 

Songs
Source : various

to the tune of “Hey Jude”

Hey, Jews, don’t be afraid.

You were made to Escape Mitzrayim.

In Sinai, the Lord will help you to live

And He will give you all some mayim.

Hey, Jews, it’s time to start.

God will part all The Red Sea waters.

Remember, pack matzah and be real brave.

God’s gonna save your sons and daughters.

The Lord will free you from your pain,

The whip, the chain. Have faith,

and you’ll all be happy later.

Hey, Jews, your tales from days of old will all be told

By all your descendants at their seder.

Da da da da da Da da da da.

Hey, Jews, don’t be afraid.

You were made to

Escape Mitzrayim. I

n Sinai, the Lord will help you to live

And He will give you all some mayim

Mayim, mayim, mayim, mayim, mayim, mayim, wooow!

Da da da da da da da Da da da da

Hey, Jews

Etc.

Songs
Source : various

to the tune of “All That Jazz”

Come on, babe, it’s time to say a prayer

WITH ALL THESE JEWS.

Grab some matzah, lean back in your chair

WITH ALL THESE JEWS.

Tell a story from the days of old

When our people could be bought and sold.

Just sit back and let the tale be told

WITH ALL THESE JEWS.

God said, “Moses, take a look around.

AT ALL THESE JEWS.

Go tell Pharaoh that it’s way past time

TO FREE THESE JEWS.”

God showed Moses what he had to do,

Helped the Jews tell Pharaoh “Toodleoo.”

So tonight we’re singing Dayenu

WITH ALL

THESE

JEWS.

Songs
Source : various

to the tune of “Fifty Ways to Leave Your Lover”

We build the pyramids. We live in pain and fear.

We’re beaten and we’re bullied by the brutal overseer.

So Moses, can you help us, cause we really need to hear

About the Fifty Ways to Leave Mitzrayim.

Fifty Ways to Leave Mitzrayim.

So Moses said, I’ve seen the way a bush can burn.

And Adonai has told me that the Jews are my concern.

So if you listen closely, I believe that you will learn

About the Fifty Ways to Leave Mitzrayim.

Fifty Ways to Leave Mitzrayim.

(Chorus)

Don’t move a brick, Rick,

Make sure to pray, Ray,

Bring on a plague, Gregg,

Listen to me.

Leave in the night, Dwight,

Don’t wait for the bread, Ned,

Cross the Red Sea, Lee,

And get yourself free.

Moses continued, We can flee our evil foe.

And Adonai will lead us to the land where we can go.

So pack your matzah quickly if you really want to know

About the Fifty Ways to Leave Mitzrayim.

Fifty Ways to Leave Mitzrayim.

(Chorus)

Don’t move a brick, Rick,

Make sure to pray, Ray,

Bring on a plague, Gregg,

Listen to me.

Leave in the night, Dwight,

Don’t wait for the bread, Ned,

Cross the Red Sea, Lee,

And get yourself free.

Songs
Source : Traditional Spiritual Freedom Song

Some bright morning when this life is over
I'll fly away
To that home on Gods celestial shore
I'll fly away

I'll fly away, oh glory
I'll fly away in the morning
When I die hallelujah by and by
I'll fly away

When the shadows of this life have gone
I'll fly away
Like a bird from these prison walls I'll fly
I'll fly away

I'll fly away, oh glory
I'll fly away in the morning
When I die hallelujah by and by
I'll fly away

Oh how glad and happy when we meet
I'll fly away
No more cold iron shackles on my feet
I'll fly away

I'll fly away oh glory
I'll fly away in the morning
When I die hallelujah by and by
I'll fly away

I'll fly away oh glory
I'll fly away in the morning
When I die hallelujah by and by
I'll fly away

Just a few more weary days and then
I'll fly away
To a land where joys will never end
I'll fly away

I'll fly away oh glory
I'll fly away in the morning
When I die hallelujah by and by
I'll fly away
I'll fly away

Songs

(Tevye)
"Here's to our prosperity. Our good health and happiness. And most important,"

To life, to life, l'chaim

(Tevye & Lazar)
L'chaim, l'chaim, to life

(Tevye)
Here's to the father I've tried to be

(Lazar)
Here's to my bride to be

(Both)
Drink, l'chaim, to life, to life, l'chaim
L'chaim, l'chaim, to life

(Tevye)
Life has a way of confusing us

(Lazar)
Blessing and bruising us

(Both)
Drink, l'chaim, to life

(Tevye)
God would like us to be joyful
Even when our hearts lie panting on the floor

(Lazar)
How much more can we be joyful
When there's really something
To be joyful for

(Both)
To life, to life, l'chaim

(Tevye)
To Tzeitel, my daughter

(Lazar)
My wife
It gives you something to think about

(Tevye)
Something to drink about

(Both)
Drink, l'chaim, to life

(Lazar - spoken)
"Reb Mordcha."

(Mordcha - spoken)
"Yes, Lazar Wolf."

(Lazar - spoken)
"Drinks for everybody."

(Mendel - spoken)
"What's the occasion?"

(Lazar - spoken)
"I'm taking myself a bride."

(All - spoken)
"Who? ... Who?"

(Lazar - spoken)
"Tevye's eldest, Tzeitel."

(All - spoken)
"Mazeltove... wonderful... congratulations."

(All - sung)
To Lazar Wolf

(Tevye)
To Tevye

(All)
To Tzeitel, your daughter

(Lazar)
My wife

(All)
May all your futures be pleasant ones
Not like our present ones
Drink, l'chaim, to life
To life, l'chaim
L'chaim, l'chaim, to life
It takes a wedding to make us say
Let's live another day
Drink, l'chaim, to life

We'll raise a glass and sip a drop of schnapps
In honor of the great good luck
That favored you

We know that
When good fortune favors two such men
It stands to reason we deserve it too
To us and our good fortune
Be happy, be healthy, long life
And if our good fortune never comes
Here's to whatever comes
Drink, l'chaim, to life

Dai-dai-dai-dai-dai-dai-dai
Dai-dai-dai-dai-dai-dai-dai
Dai-dai-dai-dai-dai-dai-dai
Dai-dai-dai-dai-dai-dai-dai

(Russian)
Zachava zdarovia
Heaven bless you both nazdrovia
To your health and may we live together in peace

Zachava zdarovia
Heaven bless you both nazdrovia
To your health and may we live together in peace

May you both be favored with the future of your choice
May you live to see a thousand reasons to rejoice

(Other Russians)
Zachava zdarovia
Heaven bless you both nazdrovia
To your health and may we live together in peace

(There is an instrumental bridge here wherein the choreography encompasses the "bottle dance" featured in this number that
is performed by the "Russian" characters.)

We'll raise a glass and sip a drop of schnapps
In honor of the great good luck
That favored you

We know that
When good fortune favors two such men
It stands to reason we deserve it too
To us and our good fortune
Be happy, be healthy, long life
And if our good fortune never comes
Here's to whatever comes
Drink, l'chaim, to life

(Tevye)
To life!