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Introduction
Source : National Jewish Outreach Program's Beginners' Haggadah
The Seder Table

Before beginning the Seder, it is important to make sure that you have everything necessary. No Seder table is complete without the following:
1) Three Whole (unbroken) Matzot -- which should be covered by a cloth. One should try to use shmura (specially watched) matzah for the Seder, and one should make certain that the matzah is marked Kosher for Passover.
2) Wine (grape juice) and Wine Glasses -- All participants should be given a glass or cup (minimum size of 3.3 ounces) from which to drink the required Four Cups of Wine (wine is preferable, grape juice if necessary). Of course, only Kosher for
Passover wine or grape juice should be used.
3) The Seder Plate - It is traditional to place the following items on a special Seder Plate as a way of “beautifying” the mitzvot of the Seder. The items should be placed as diagramed below:

--- Bay’tza /Roasted (hardboiled) Egg -- The egg is included as a symbol of the cycle of life because of its round shape.
--- Z’roa /Shank Bone -- The offering brought to the Temple on Passover was a lamb. Because we do not have the Temple today, we place the shank bone of a lamb or the bone of another kosher animal or fowl on the Seder Plate, to symbolize that offering.
--- Maror /Bitter Herbs – Bitter herbs are part of the Seder to remind participants of the bitterness and pain of slavery.
--- Karpas /Vegetable -- A vegetable, usually a piece of celery, parsley or potato, which is dipped in salt water as required for the Seder ritual.
--- Charoset – A tasty mixture of chopped walnuts, wine, cinnamon and apples that represents the mortar the Jewish slaves used to build Pharaoh’s cities (recipes may vary by community).
---Chazeret/Bitter Vegetable – Chazeret is a bitter vegetable, like lettuce or celery, which is sometimes placed on the Seder Plate to remind us of the bitter lives of the Israelites as slaves.
4) Salt Water -- in which to dip the karpas. Salt water reminds us of the tears of the Jewish slaves. Usually, the salt water is not placed on the Seder Plate, but near it.
5) Elijah’s Cup -- Toward the end of the Seder, this cup is filled with wine, the door is opened, and Elijah the prophet, the harbinger of the Messianic age, is invited to come to the Seder, and hopefully, begin our final redemption.

Introduction
Source : Unknown
Welcome

Welcome friends. We are pleased that you could join us this year to share our Passover seder. Though not all of us share the same backgrounds, we are all connected by our yearning. As we yearn to be free in our lives, this Passover we should reflect on those things that bind us. These things might be material, emotional, spiritual, or even irrational. Our hope today is to cast off those bindings and to don a slightly lighter garment of irreverence while we enjoy one another's company during this joyous festival.

This isn't the haggadah for Jews or Goyim or atheists or Christians or Fascists or Communists— this is the one for you, you who demands real justice for yourself and all the world. This is the haggadah for the people, all of us, and it was made with the knowledge that so long as one of us is shackled, none of us are free.

All attempts have been made to include enough content for the seder to be meaningful while also cherishing the brevity that seems so often lacking in our day-to-day lives.  May we all leave this seder tonight with plenty of time remaining to make it to Jerusalem next year (with ample time to make the arduous journey through airport security).

So friends, grab a cushion, lounge around a bit, have some wine, and enjoy the Passover.

Introduction
by Betsy
Source : original

Passover, more than any other one ritual or holiday, is a summary of Judaism.  It follows the story of redemption from slavery in Egypt, the formative journey through the Sinai desert on the way to the land of Israel, and various encounters with God, culminating in the revelation of Torah.  During the process, what has been a family and a tribal story becomes a national story: it is in leaving Egypt that we become the Jewish people.

On the first night of Passover, we gather together for a Seder to remember the history of the Jews.  However, unlike on other holidays, we are not only commanded to hear the story of our ancestors, but to participate in the retelling.  In doing so, we re-experience our enslavement and eventual emancipation.

The Seder, a feast involving opportunities for prayer and instruction, is a chance for us to share in giving thanks and for us to remember the blessing of our relationship with God.  Perhaps the most important contribution of the Passover story to the Jewish narrative is the emphasis on unyielding hope in the face of adversity.  In that spirit, Passover also focuses us on the coming spring and encourages us to welcome this new season of rebirth with faith and optimism.

Introduction
Source : Multiple sources

Lighting of the Holiday Candles

May these candles, lighted on the Festival of Freedom, bring light into our hearts and minds. May they renew our courage to act for justice and freedom here and now. May they illumine the path to truth, justice and peace. And so we repeat the ancient blessing:

ברוך אתה יי אלהינו מלך העולם אשר קדשנו במצותיו וצונו להדליק נר של יום טוב

Baruch atah Adonai Elohaynoo melech ha-olam, asher keedshanoo b’meetzvotav v’tzeevanoo l’hadleek ner shel (Shabbat v’shel) yom tov.

Praised are You, Lord our God, Whose presence fills the universe, Who has sanctified our lives through Your commandments and commanded us to kindle the Shabbat and festival lights.

 

ברוך אתה יי אלהינו מלך העולם שהחינו וקימנו והגיענו לזמן הזה

Baruch ata Adonai, Elohaynoo melech ha-olam, sheh’hech’eeyanoo v’keeyemanoo, v’heegeeanoo la-z’man ha-zeh.

Praised are You, Lord our God, Whose presence fills the universe, Who has sanctified our lives through Your commandments and commanded us to kindle the festival lights.

 

Kadesh
Source : Original
Kadesh

Kadesh
Source : Unknown

Our first cup of wine (or grape juice) is for the physical spring that we see, hear, smell, touch. It is one of the many miracles we see every year. Green forces its way through the cracks of the hard earth. Birds begin to venture out and sing. The scent of flowers perfumes the air. Warmth begins to creep into our skin and make us feel alive again.

We raise our cups and recite:

Baruch atah adonai, elohaynu melech ha'olam, borei p'ri ha'gafen.

Urchatz
Source : haggadot
Urchatz

Urchatz is the time

We wash our hands, we wash them well

Who will be first, I will not tell?

Ok....I will choose if I must.

Whoever I pick will be neat, I trust.

Urchatz
Source : http://www.tikkun.org/nextgen/passover-haggadah-supplement-2011-2

We wash our hands, without saying the blessing. Each person washes the hand of the person next to her (pouring it over a bowl). Imagine that you are washing away all cynicism and despair, and allow yourself to be filled with the hope that the world could be really transformed in accord with our highest vision.

Karpas
Source : istockphoto.com
Karpas

Our tale to tell, both happy and sad,

like all great lore, some good, some bad

On our table the symbols abound

you needn't look far, they're all around

Look on your plate, for parsley green

a sign of Spring when it is seen.

And somewhere near there is salt water,

tears of slavery, hard work with mortar

And so together, we now recall

the green around, the tears that fall.

Ba-ruch A-tah A-do-nai, E-lo-hei-nu Me-lech Ha-o-lam,

Bo-rei pe-ree ha-a-da-mah.

Oh Holy One of Blessing, Your presence fills creation,

We praise You for creating the fruit of the ground!

source: A Family Pesach Seder In Rhyme

Karpas
Source : Original

We dip a green vegetable, often parsley, into saltwater and recite the blessing for green foods that grow in the ground.

Why? The traditional reason, according to the Sages of the ages, is to taste the salty tears of slavery. 

But is there more?

Of course! Isn't there always?

1. Passover is the Festival of spring and the rebirth of nature after the dormancy of winter. New green growth returns to the fields, replacing the brown of winter. The parsely we dip tonight is a tasteful reminder of our dependence on the ability of the earth to regenerate the food that enables all life - human and animal - to exist. The saltwater symbolizes the origin of all life in the sea, and the interdependence of ocean and land in the cycle of fertility.

2. The parsely also historically represents the hyssop which was dipped into the salty (saline) blood of a lamb to mark the door posts of the Israelites homes in Egypt on that fateful night of the 10th plague and the ensuing exodus.

The custom of dipping one food into another or into some sauce or condiment is usually characteristic of an appetizer or prelude to something more substantial to follow.

Symbolism is wonderful, but it doesn't fill a hungry stomach. It is truly just a prelude - to action - to remind us as we feast for freedom how many still fast for lack of food and perish for want of sufficient nourishment.

As we observe this time-honored Seder tradition, let it sensitize us to our obligation as partners with God to continue to strive to make this a more just and perfect world.

Tonight, especially, when we remember from where we came and where we are today, let us renew our commitment to helping all who hunger find stable, sustainable sources of sustenance in this world, just as God renews nature every spring.

Karpas
Source : A Growing Haggadah

Even before the Exodus from Egypt our ancestors probably celebrated the mystery of life and the creation of the world each spring. Now again, we remind ourselves of the greens of the earth and the salt of the sea from which all life emerged, and on which all life depends.


But we do not simply celebrate spring’s renewal nor love’s warmth. Pesach celebrates our becoming free. Through the wondrous rebirth of life we can feel the precarious beginnings of the struggle for freedom. The sea’s salt not only reminds us of life’s start, but also of the brine of tears shed by our people and by all people striving to be free.

Karpas
Source : Unknown

Just as Karpas reminds of spring, flowers bring us the sweet aromas of the season.

Karpas
Source : A Growing Haggadah

Rabbi Meir ben Tzipporah v’Nechemia haLevi was often asked about the meaning of the roasted egg. It remains on the Seder Plate, yet never discussed. The egg reminds us of many things. Its presence on the Seder Plate represents the holiday sacrifice our ancestors made when the Temple stood. But, as with any good symbol it is rich with meaning. The egg itself is symbolic of life and reminds us of the blossoming world around us. The egg’s roundness reminds us of the unending nature of life. But why is it roasted? Some tell us that, like the roasted egg, the Jewish people gets harder and stronger the more they are tested.

Yachatz
Source : Original
Yachatz -- How To Break A Matza

Breaking the matza into only two pieces
may sometimes prove challenging.
Here's a possible solution.

Yachatz
Source : The Jewish Secular Community Passover Hagada

Reader:
In recent history, we have added an additional piece of matza in our Seder. This matza is set aside as a symbol of hope for the Jews of the World. It reminds us of the links that exist amongst us. While we observe this festival of freedom, we know that there are some areas in the world where discrimination towards Jews still exist.

ALL:
We hope that all Jews and all people can enjoy freedom.

Yachatz
Source : Rachel Barenblat

This is the bread of affliction which our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt.  Let all who are hungry come and eat; let all who are needy come and celebrate the Passover with us.  Now we are here; next year may we be in the Land of Israel. Now we are slaves; next year may we be free.

We break the matzah as we broke the chains of slavery, and as we break chains which bind us today. We will no more be fooled by movements which free only some of us, in which our so - called “freedom” rests upon the  enslavement or embitterment of others.

Traditionally, seders require three matzot. Why three?   Three are our patriarchs, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.  Three  are the segments of the people Israel, Kohen, Levi and Yisrael.  The three matzot could even represent thesis, antithesis and synthesis: the two opposites in any polarized situation, and the solution which bridges them.

Maggid - Beginning
Source : National Jewish Outreach Program's Beginners' Haggadah
B’chol Dor Va’Dor -- In Every Generation

In every generation it is every person’s duty to regard him/herself as though he/she personally had come out of Egypt, as it is written: “You shall tell your son on that day: This is on account of what the L-rd did for me when I came out of Egypt.” It was not only our ancestors whom the Holy One redeemed from slavery; we, too, were redeemed with them, as it is written: “He took us out from there so that He might take us to the land which He had sworn to our ancestors.”

***POINTS TO PONDER***
Beyond the Feeling
Essential to the Passover experience is the understanding that one should feel that the miracles that G-d performed for our ancestors were for us as well. Passover is our opportunity to feel personal redemption. Rabbi Moses ben Maimon (Rambam/ Maimonides - 1135 - 1204 C.E., Spain) stated that a person must make him/herself appear as if he/she is currently leaving the oppression in Egypt. As a result, some families have the custom of putting matzah on their shoulders and walking around the table.

Your Thoughts: This is an excellent place in the Seder to take a moment and reflect upon moments when you, personally, felt G-d’s hand influencing your life:

-- Four Questions
Source : Unknown

 The Four Questions

The telling of the story of Passover is framed as a discussion with lots of questions and answers. It’s tradition that the youngest person in the family asks the questions. The rabbis who created the set format for the seder gave us the Four Questions to help break the ice in case no one had their own questions. Asking questions is a core tradition in Jewish life. If everyone at yourseder is around the same age, perhaps the person with the least seder experience can ask them – or everyone can sing them all together.

 מַה נִּשְׁתַּנָּה הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה מִכָּל הַלֵּילות?  

Mah nish-ta-nah ha-lai-lah ha-zeh mi-kol ha-lei-lot?

Why is this night different from all other nights?

 

:שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכלין חָמֵץ וּמַצָּה  הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה כֻּלּוֹ מצה  

She-b'chol ha-lei-lot a-nu och-lin cha-meitz u-ma-tzah? Ha-lai-lah ha-zeh, ku-lo ma-tzah?

Why on all other nights we eat both leavened bread and matzah, and
tonight we only eat matzah?

 

 

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכְלִין שְׁאָר יְרָקוֹת הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה מָרוֹר:

She-b'chol ha-lei-lot a-nu och-lin sh'ar y'ra -kot. Ha-lai-lah ha-zeh ma-ror?

On all other nights we eat all kinds of vegetables, but tonight why do we only eat bitter herbs?

 

 

. שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אֵין אָֽנוּ מַטְבִּילִין אֲפִילוּ פַּֽעַם אחָת 
 הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה שְׁתֵּי פְעמים:

She-b'chol ha-lei-lot ein anu mat-bi-lin a-fi-lu pa-am, e-hat. Ha-lai-lah ha-zeh, sh'tei f'a-mim?

On all other nights we aren’t expected to dip our vegetables at all. 
Why, tonight, do we do it twice?

 

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכְלִין בֵּין יוֹשְׁבִין וּבֵין מְסֻבִּין.
 :הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה כֻּלָּֽנוּ מְסֻבין:

She-b'chol ha-lei-lot a-nu och-lin bein yosh-vin o'vein m-subin. Ha-lai-lah na-zeh ku-la-nu m-su-bin?

On all other nights we eat either sitting normally or reclining. Why do we sit reclining tonight?

 

Answer 1: We were slaves in Egypt. Our ancestor in flight from Egypt did not have time to let the dough rise. With not a moment to spare they snatched up the dough they had prepared and fled. But the hot sun beat as they carried the dough along with them and baked it into the flat unleavened bread we call matzah.

Answer 2: The first time we dip our greens to taste the brine of enslavement. We also dip to remind ourselves of all life and growth, of earth and sea, which gives us sustenance and comes to life again in the springtime.

Answer 3: The second time we dip the maror into the charoset. The charoset reminds us of the mortar that our ancestors mixed as slaves in Egypt. But our charoset is made of fruit and nuts, to show us that our ancestors were able to withstand the bitterness of slavery because it was sweetened by the hope of freedom.

Answer 4: Slaves were not allowed to rest, not even while they ate. Since our ancestors were freed from slavery, we recline to remind ourselves that we, like our ancestors, can overcome bondage in our own time. We also recline to remind ourselves that rest and rejuvenation are vital to continuing our struggles. We should take pleasure in reclining, even as we share our difficult history.

 

 

-- Four Questions
Source : www.bangitout.com

Ywhay isyay ityay atthay onyay allyay otheryay ightsnay uringday ethay yearay eway eatyay eitheryay eadbray oryay atzohmay, utbay onyay isthay ightnay eway eatyay onlyyay atzohmay? Ywhay isyay ityay atthay onyay allyay otheryay ightsnay eway eatyay allyay indskay ofyay erbshay, utbay onyay isthay ightnay eway eatyay onlyyay itterbay erbshay? Ywhay isyay ityay atthay onyay allyay otheryay ightsnay eway oday otnay ipday ouryay erbshay evenyay onceyay, utbay onyay isthay ightnay eway ipday emthay icetway? Ywhay isyay ityay atthay onyay allyay otheryay ightsnay eway eatyay eitheryay ittingsay oryay ecliningray, utbay onyay isthay ightnay eway eatyay inyay ayay ecliningray ositionpay?

-- Four Questions
Source : www.notesfromthetribe.com
Matzah Ball Soup

I've added a fifth question to the seder this year:

Why is it that in any other form, this matzoh we eat is the bread of affliction which our forefathers ate when the holy one, blessed be he brought us forth with an outstretched arm from bondage in the land of egypt. But, when combined with salt, schmaltz, and chicken broth, becomes a delicious comfort food served by Jewish bubbys year round?

-- Four Children
Source : UJC & The Federations of North America Haggadah

The Torah describes four children who ask questions about the Exodus. Tradition teaches that these verses refer to four different types of children.

The wise child asks, “What are the laws that God has commanded us?”
The parent should answer by instructing the child in the laws of Passover, starting from the beginning and ending with the laws of the Afikomen.

The wicked child asks, “What does this Passover service mean to you?”
The parent should answer, “It is because of what God did for me when I came out of Egypt. Specifically ‘me’ and not ‘you.’ If you had been there (with your attitude), you wouldn’t have been redeemed.”

The simple child asks, “What is this Seder service?”
The parent should answer, “With a mighty hand God brought us out of Egypt.
Therefore, we commemorate that event tonight through this Seder.”

And then there is child who does not know how to ask.
The parent should begin a discussion with that child based on the verse:
“And you shall tell your child on that day, ‘We commemorate Passover tonight because of what God did for us when we went out of Egypt.’”

-- Four Children
Source : Original

There is  something else hidden tonight in addition to the Afikoman.

We generally think of the Four Children as distinct individuals, or personalities, or types.

Each asks (or doesn't ask) a different type of question and in a different tone. (This is the Haggadah's way of explaining why the Torah seems to say we should tell our children about the Exodus from Egypt in different words, and in differing levels of detail. The Book of Proverbs tells us to "teach a child in the way s/he can understand (appropriate to each age, intellectual and interest level), and as s/he grows older that knowledge will remain."

But just flip the list upside down, and a different picture emerges.

Suddenly, we see ourselves at all the stages of our human development from childhood to adulthood and beyond, reflected in this passage.

The one who doesn't know what or how to ask is too young - perhaps a pre-schooler, or simply incapable of asking.

The simple one. Simple questions from a young child just learning about life - just learning how to read and reason - require simple, declarative if not definitive, answers, without equivocation and as factual but unfrightening as we can make them.

The rebellious one - (often erroneously referred to as wicked) - that's us as teenagers, challenging authority, seeking our own answers, trying to make sense of things we now summarily reject out of hand that once we had accepted as revealed truth.

The wise one. Then, IF we survive our teenage rebelliousness, we FINALLY emerge into adult maturity, and hopefully, attain wisdom or something akin to it, that enables us to function in, if not make sense of, the world we inhabit. 

If we are lucky, this last stage lasts a lifetime.

(For many, however, the ladder UP eventually becomes the staircase DOWN again, as we pass through the wisdom of adulthood, back to a a cantankerous stubbornness or rebelliousness, to simplicity, and finally, sadly, to the silence of no longer knowing how, or caring what, to ask.)

-- Exodus Story
-- Exodus Story
Source : JQ International GLBT Haggadah

During the time when Pharaoh issued his decree to kill Israelite males, Moses, who later was to lead the Israelites out of slavery in Egypt to freedom, was an infant. His concerned mother, Jochebed placed him in a basket of reeds in the Nile River while Moses’ sister Miriam watched from a distance to see who would come to find him. The basket was found by the Pharaoh’s daughter, who decided to raise the infant as her own son and named him Moses. She unknowingly hired Jochebed as a nurse to care for him, and Jochebed secretly taught Moses his Israelite heritage. At age 40, on a visit to see his fellow Israelites, Moses saw an Egyptian taskmaster beating an Israelite slave and in his rage, killed the Egyptian. Fearing for his life, Moses fled Egypt. He fled across the desert, for the roads were watched by Egyptian soldiers, and took refuge in Midian, an area in present-day northwestern Saudi Arabia along the eastern shores of the Red Sea.

             

While in Midian, Moses met a Midianite priest named Jethro and became a shepherd for the next 40 years, eventually marrying one of Jethro’s daughters, Zipporah. Then, when Moses was about 80 years of age, God spoke to him from a burning bush and said that he and his brother Aaron were selected by God to lead the Israelites out of Egypt to freedom. At first, Moses hesitated to take on such a huge task, but eventually Moses and his brother Aaron set about returning to Egypt, commencing what was to be the spectacular and dramatic events that are told in the story of Passover. It is said that the Israelites entered Egypt as a group of tribes and left Egypt one nation. It has also been estimated that the Passover exodus population comprised about 3 million people, plus numerous flocks of sheep who all crossed over the border of Egypt to freedom in Canaan.

             

Under the reign of Pharaoh Thutmose III in Egypt in 1476 BCE, the Israelite leader Moses (“Moshe” in Hebrew) – guided by God – led his people out of Egypt after a series of 10 plagues that were created by God and initiated by Moses. Prior to most of the plagues, Moses had warned the Pharaoh about each plague and that it would devastate his people, if he refused to let the Israelites go. After the first two plagues, the Pharaoh refused to let them go because his court magicians were able to re-create the same miracles, and so the Pharaoh thought: “This proves that the Israelite God is not stronger than I.” But when the third plague occurred, the Pharaoh’s magicians were not able to duplicate this miracle; however, that still did not change the Pharaoh’s mind about letting the Israelites leave Egypt. After each subsequent plague, the Pharaoh agreed to let the Israelites go, but the Pharaoh soon changed his mind and continued to hold the Israelites as slaves. Finally, after the 10th plague, the Pharaoh let the Israelites go for good.


With your finger tip, remove one drop of wine from your cup and wipe it on your plate, as each plague is mentioned…

The Second Cup – The 10 Plagues

 

Blood – דָּם

Frogs – צְפֵרְדֵּעַ

Lice – כִּנִים

Wild Beasts – עָרוֹב

Blight – דֶּבֶר

Boils שְׁחִין

Hail – בָּרַד

Locusts – אַרְבֶּה

Darkness – חשֶׁךְ

Slaying of the First-Born – מַכַּת בְּכוֹרוֹת

 

When the Pharaoh finally agreed to free the Israelite slaves, they left their homes so quickly that there wasn’t even time to bake their breads. So they packed the raw dough to take with them on their journey. As they fled through the desert they would quickly bake the dough in the hot sun into hard crackers called matzah. Today to commemorate this event, Jews eat matzah in place of bread during Passover.

 

Though the Israelites were now free, their liberation was incomplete. The Pharaoh’s army chased them through the desert towards the Red Sea. When the Israelites reached the sea they were trapped, since the sea blocked their escape. When the Israelites saw the Egyptian army fast approaching toward them, they called out in despair to Moses. Fortunately, God intervened and commanded Moses to strike his staff on the waters of the Red Sea, creating a rift of land between the waves, enabling the Israelites to cross through the Red Sea to safety on the other side. Once the Israelites were safely across, God then commanded Moses to strike the waters of the Red Sea with his staff again, just as the Egyptian army followed them through the parted Red Sea. The waters came together again, drowning the entire Egyptian army and the Israelites were saved.

-- Exodus Story
Source : http://www.lyricstime.com/shalom-jerusalem-hinei-ma-tov-behold-how-good-lyrics.html
It is traditional at this point in the seder, to sing songs of praise. This is one of my favorites for this event.

Hinei ma tov umanaim

Shevet achim gam yachad

Hinei ma tov umanaim

Shevet achim gam yachad

Behold how good and

How pleasant it is

For brothers to dwell together

-- Ten Plagues
Source : Telling the Story: A Passover Haggadah Explained

A Medieval addition to the Haggadah, this hymn originally contained fifteen verses mirroring the fifteen steps in the Seder.

 

How many are the gifts God bestowed upon us! Had God:

Brought us out of Egypt and not divided the sea for us

Divided the sea and not permitted us to cross on dry land,

Permitted us to cross on dry land and not sustained us for forty years in the desert,

Sustained us for forty years in the desert and not fed us with manna

Fed us with manna and not given us the Sabbath

Given us the Sabbath and not brought us to Mount Sinai

Brought us to Mount Sinai and not given us the Torah

Dayenu Dayenu

Dayenu Dayenu Dayenu Dayenu Dayenu

Day, dayenu, day, dayenu, day, dayenu, dayenu, dayenu...

Ilu hotsi hotsianu, hotsianu mi-Mitzrayim, hotisanu mi-Mitzrayim, Dayenu Ilu natan natan lanu, natan lanu et ha-Shabbat, natan lanu et ha-Shabbat, Dayenu. Ilu natan natan lanu, natan lanu et ha-Torah, natan lanu et ha-Torah, Dayenu.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Rabbi Geela Rayzel Raphael, Five Interfaith Passover Readings You Can Add to Your Haggadah</a>

The seder plate holds the main symbols of a traditional Passover seder-- the shank bone, egg, karpas, charoset, and maror. The Kabbalists of the Middle Ages added hazeret, another kind of bitter lettuce. And in recent years feminists have added an orange on the seder plate to symbolize women's leadership roles and full empowerment in Jewish life.

The artichoke however is a new development. What is an artichoke? Surely a work of God's imagination! Many petals, with thistle and a heart. To me this has come to represent the Jewish people.

We are first of all, very diverse in our petals. We call people Jews who are everything from very traditional Orthodox Hassidim, to very liberal secular. We are Reform, Reconstructionist, Orthodox, traditional, Modern Orthodox, Conservative, Renewal, and, of course, post-denominational. We are social justice activists and soldiers; we are Israelis and Jews of the Diaspora. We are young, old, single, married. Many are vegetarian, while others swear by Hebrew National. Our skin can be white as Scandinavian, dark black as Ethiopian, and we now welcome many Chinese and Latin American adoptees. Lately we add another category, that of interfaith.

Like the artichoke, which has thistles protecting its heart, the Jewish people have been thorny about this question of interfaith marriage. Let this artichoke on the seder plate tonight stand for the wisdom of God's creation in making the Jewish people a population able to absorb many elements and cultures throughout the centuries--yet still remain Jewish. Let the thistles protecting our hearts soften so that we may notice the petals around us.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Original

We are required to mention the three symbols of Pesach.

The Roasted Shankbone is a reminder for us that we placed lambs blood on the doors of our homes so that G-d would pass over "posach" our homes  when we were slaves in Egypt.  He then killed the first born sons of the Egyptians as the tenth plague.

Matzoh is the flat, unleavened bread which we ate when ran from Egypt in a hurry.  There was no time to wait for the dough to rise.

Moror- Bitter Herbs are to remind us that the Egyptians embittered our lives by making us slaves in Egypt. 

Other symbols are the roasted egg, to remind us of when we would make a sacrifice to the priests at the Temple.  It also serves to remind us that we, the Jewish faith, are strong and adversity makes us even stronger.

The orange at the table is fairly new.  It is a reminder to all that women actually did and do play a part in Judiasm, not just table setting and cooking.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

Raise the second cup of wine

Group:

In every generation a person is obligated to regard himself as if he had come out of Egypt, as it is written: "You shall tell your child on that day, it is because of this that the Lord did for me when I left Egypt." The Holy One redeemed from slavery; we, too, were redeemed with them, as it is written: "He took us out from there so that He might take us to the land which He had sworn to our fathers."

 

Therefore it is our duty to thank, to laud, to praise, to glorify, to exalt, to adore, to bless, to elevate and to honor the One who did all these miracles for our fathers and for us. He took us from slavery to freedom, from sorrow to joy, and from mourning to festivity, and from deep darkness to great light, and from bondage to redemption. Let us therefore recite before Him Halleluyah-Praise God!

 

Halleluyah-Praise God! Offer praise, you servants of the Lord; praise the Name of the Lord. May the Lord's Name be blessed from now and to all eternity. From the rising of the sun to it’s setting, the Lord's Name is praised. The Lord is high above all nations; His glory is over the heavens. Who is like the Lord, our god, who dwells on high yet looks down so low upon heaven and earth? He raises the poor from the dust, He lifts the needy from the dunghill, to seat them with nobles, with the nobles of His people. He restores the barren woman to the house, into a joyful mother of children. Halleluyah-Praise God!

 

Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the universe, who has redeemed us and our fathers from Egypt and enabled us to attain this night to eat matzah and mirror. So too, Lord our God and God of our fathers, enable us to attain other holidays and festivals that will come to us in peace- with happiness in the rebuilding of Your city, and with rejoicing in Your service. Then we shall eat of the sacrifices and of the Passover offerings whose blood shall be sprinkled on the wall of Your altar for acceptance; and we shall thank You with a new song for our redemption and for the deliverance of our souls. 

Blessed are You, Lord, who redeemed Israel. 

 

Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the universe, who creates the fruit of the vine. 

(Drink the second cup of wine)

Rachtzah
Source : Original
Rachtzah

Rachtzah
Source : A Family Pesach Seder in Rhyme

The moment's near when we shall eat

a snack, a meal, a Seder treat

Our customs held in high esteem

that when we eat our hands be clean

For all that we can do or say

a blessing must precede the way

(Participants should wash their hands and recite the following blessing:) 

Ba-ruch A-tah A-do-nai, E-lo-hei-nu Me-lech Ha-o-lam,

a-sheer keed-sha-nu be-meetz-vo-tav, vee-tzee-va-nu

al n'tee-lat ya-da-yeem.

O Holy One of Blessing, Your Presence fills creation;

You made us special with your mitzvot, and You have

instructed us to wash our hands.

Motzi-Matzah
Source : Excerpts taken from: "How Matzah Became Square: Manishewitz and the Development of Machine-Made Matzah in the United States"
Manishewitz Matzah ad

"How Matzah Became Square: Manishewitz and the Development of Machine-Made Matzah in the United States," Jonathan D. Sarna. Sixth Annual Lecture of the Victor J. Selmanowitz Chair of Jewish History, 2005.

Typical English-language advertisements for Manishewitz matzoh (1919-1920). The ad associates the firms' matzoh with the highest standards of kashruth. The It also indicates that the firm was facing competition from other brands that sought to imitate its success.

Motzi-Matzah
Source : The Union Haggadah, ed. by The Central Council of American Rabbis, at sacred-texts.com

The upper Matzo is broken and distributed. All then read in unison:

BORUCH ATTO ADONOI ELOHENU MELECH HO‘OLOM HAMOTZI LEḤEM MIN HO’ORETZ.

Praised art Thou, O Lord our God, King of the universe, who bringest forth bread from the earth.

BORUCH ATTO ADONOI ELOHENU MELECH HO‘OLOM ASHER KIDD’SHONU B’MITZVOSOV V’TZIVONU AL ACHILAS MATZO.

Praised art Thou, O Lord our God, King of the universe, who hast sanctified us through Thy commandments, and ordained that we should eat unleavened bread.

Eat the Matzo.

Maror
Source : Original
Maror

Maror
Source : A Family Pesach Seder in Rhyme

And now to think, we taste some Maror

to remind us all of slavery's horror

Maror, a herb with bitter taste

should teach us all enslavement's waste

Ba-ruch A-tah A-do-nai, E-lo-hei-nu Me-lech Ha-o-lam,

a-sheer keed-sha-nu be-meetz-vo-tav, 

vee-tzee-va-nu al a -chee-lat ma-ror.

O Holy One of Blessing, Your Presence fills creation;

You have made us special with Your Mitzvot, and You have

instructed us to eat Maror during Pesach.

Hillel, a rabbi of old

had a custom of which we are told

a sandwich he said

made from matzah, not bread

filled with marror and charosets  -- served cold

Maror
Source : Jewish Family Education Passover Haggadah, by Rabbi Barry Dov Lerner, adapted

Praised are you, Adonai, our God, sovereign of the universe, who has made us holy through His commandments, commanding us to eat the bitter herb.

Koreich
Source : Original
Korech

Koreich
Source : The Union Haggadah, ed. by The Central Council of American Rabbis, at sacred-texts.com

Each person receives some bitter herbs and ḥaroses, which he places between two pieces of matzo. The leader then reads:

This was the practice of Hillel, at the time the Temple was still in existence. He combined the unleavened bread and the bitter herbs and ate them together, to carry out the injunction concerning the Passover sacrifice: "With unleavened bread and with bitter herbs, they shall eat it."

All read in unison:

BORUCH ATTO ADONOI ELOHENU MELECH HO‘OLOM ASHER KIDD’SHONU B’MITZVOSOV V’TZIVONU AL ACHILAS MOROR.

Praised art Thou, O Lord our God, King of the universe, who hast sanctified us by Thy commandments, and ordained that we should eat bitter herbs.

Eat the Moror.

Shulchan Oreich
Shulchan Oreich
Source : Unknown

!בתאבון

Let's eat!

Dig in!

Bon Appetit!

 

 

Tzafun
Source : Original
Tzafun

Tzafun
Source : Foundation for Family Education, Inc.

(When the Afikoman is found, the following is an alternative  or  supplementary reading on the part of all Seder participants:) "Tonight we read together: Lo!  This is the bread of poverty that our ancestors ate. Let all who are hungry come and eat! Let all who are in need share in the hope of Passover! This year we all are slaves, Next year may we all be free. Tonight, to redeem the Afikoman: We renew our commitment to help all who are hungry round the world, So that next year we may all be free.

Bareich
Source : Unknown

Pick up the third cup of wine and give the Grace After the Meal

Group:

Blessed be He of Whose gifts we have eaten, and through Whose goodness we live.

Blessed art Thou, O Eternal, our God! King of the Universe, who feedest the whole world with Thy goodness, with grace, with loving-kindness and tender mercy: He giveth food to all flesh, food hath not yet failed us, nor will fail us for evermore; for it is because of His own great name that He feedeth all and doeth good unto all, and provideth food for all His creatures which He hath created. Blessed art Thou, O Eternal, who feedest all.

Blessed be He of whose bounty we have eaten.

Leader:

We thank You, Lord our God, for having given as a heritage to our fathers a precious, good and spacious land; for having brought us out, Lord our God, for the land of Egypt and redeemed us from the house of slaves; for you covenant which you have sealed in our flesh; for Your torah which You have taught us; for Your statutes which You have made known to us;

Group:

For the life, grace and kindness which you have graciously bestowed upon us; and for the food we eat with which You constantly feed and sustain us every day, at all times and at every hour.

Group:

O Merciful One, bless us who are participating in this meal. 

Leader:

May He bless us all together with a perfect blessing, and let us say, Amen. 

Group:

Blessed are You, Lord, our God, king of the universe, who creates the fruit of the vine.

(Drink the third cup of wine)

Bareich
Source : A Family Pesach Seder in Rhyme

At times such as this, we pause and reflect

we thank God for the good that surrounds

our families, our friends,

the great blessings of freedom

and of course all the food that abounds

We make sacred the moment

with a prayer truly said

as we celebrate the blessings

of our feast of unleavened bread

Baruch Atah Adonai, ha-zan eit ha -kol.

O Holy One of blessing, we thank you for the blessings of food.

A third cup of wine we now shall drink

as we recall again to think

God's great promise of redemption

our ancestor's saw

V'ga-alti et-chem beetz-roah n'too-yah.

(Our Torah teaches that God said:  

"I will redeem you with an outstretched arm." Shemot 6:6)

Ba-ruch A-tah A-do-nai, E-lo-hei-nu Me-lech Ha-o-lam

Bo-rei, pe-ree ha-ga-fen.

O Holy One of Blessing, our Presence fills creation,

we praise you for creating the fruit of the vine.

A special guest we welcome now

the prophet Elijah to take his bow

Our custom at each Seder meal

to invite our friends, our joy to feel

One day quite soon, we all pray

Elijah will really come our way

And peaceful times he'll bring about

with joy and gladness all will shout

And so this cup for him we leave

our warm hospitality he might receive

Hallel
Source : Original
Elijah's Cup Holder

Thoughout the seder, Elijah's Cup only kinda sits there,

so why not accomodate it on a Chair made for a prophet...

Hallel
Source : Valley Beth Shalom Haggadah

The prophet Elijah symbolizes the dreams of the Jewish people. Elijah challenged the injustice of the powerful and overthrew worship of idols. He healed the sick and protected the helpless. At the end of his days, Elijah was carried off to heaven in fiery chariot. The prophet Malachi promised that Elijah will return one day to announce the coming of the Messiah, when all the world will celebrate universal freedom. Legend relates that Elijah returns to earth each day to carry forward the work of bringing justice and peace.

This cup is Elijah's cup. In setting this cup at our table, we invite Elijah to join us, and we bring his passion for justice into our lives. But the cup is empty. No one has yet stepped forward to fill it.

According to Hasidic custom begun at the table of the master Rabbi Naftali of Ropschutz, we pass Elijah's cup from person to person at the table, each person pouring a little wine into Elijah's cup from our own cups, until it is filled. In this way we recognize that we must act together, each contributing our best talents and energies, to bring Elijah's promise to the world. Only through the efforts of our hands will the world be redeemed. We open the door, we stand, and we sing of the Jewish dream of freedom.

Eliyahu ha-navi.

Eliyahu ha-tish-bee.

Eliyahu, Eliyahu, Eliyahu ha-gee-ladee.

Beem’hay’rah b’yamay’nu Yavo ay’laynu Eem mashiach ben daveed

Legend relates that Elijah enters the world each day in disguise, waiting for someone to do him a simple act of kindness. That one, caring act will trigger the redemption of the world. Where is Elijah? He could be anywhere - with a homeless family living on the street; in the AIDS ward of your local hospital; in a delapidated inner-city kindergarten classroom. He could even be the person sitting beside you right now.

Hallel
Source : Original

Everybody knows that we place a cup of wine for the prophet Eliah at the center of the Seder table. At a dramatic moment in the Seder, the door is opened to welcome this usually unseen guest into our homes in the hope that the final, messianic, redemption of all people is at hand. Our ancient traditions tell us that final redemption will come at the season of Israel's redemption from Egyptian bondage - on some Passover to come.

We sing Eliah's song, and watch expectantly and hopefully for the wine in the cup to diminish, a sure sign that Elijah has visited and the dawn of a new redemption is near.

Less known, and of more recent origin, is the custom of placing a second cup, this one filled with water, on the Seder table for a second unseen but deserving guest - the prophetess, Miriam, sister of Moses and Aaron.

Why Miriam?

Well, who was it who watched wistfully as her baby brother was whisked away in a basket floating on the waters of the Nile? Who was it who, disregarding her own safety, dared to approach the Pharaoh's daughter, Princess of Egypt, and offer to find a Hebrew woman to nurse the child for her? Who was it who led the redeemed Israelite women and men in song and dance to celebrate their salvation at the Sea? Who was it, according to tradition, for whose sake a well of fresh water followed the wandering Israelites through the wilderness so they might survive the perilous journey? 

It was Miriam, the Prophetess, symbol of all the courageous and worthy women who kept the home fires burning, even when the men became discouraged and despaired of redemption.

Who then is more deserving to be "toasted" with water, (a theme running through her life as a stream) and saluted for service "above and beyond" than she?

If the Cup of Elijah is one symbolizing hope for future redemption, Miriam's Cup symbolizes redemption realized through the tireless efforts of Israel's women. Let us honor her for her heroism, and through her, all the brave, capable, devoted, faithful and loyal women of Israel who have been, and continue to be, the ongoing source of Israel's strength.

Biglal nashim tzidkaniyot nig'alu avoteynu miMitzrayim. For the sake of our righteous women were our ancestors redeemed from Egypt.

L'Hayim!

Nirtzah
Source : Original
Nirtzah

Nirtzah
Source : Telling the Story: A Passover Haggadah Explained

Hallel is a recitation in Hebrew of Psalms. This is the time to once again give thanks. It is a time of singing and of praise. We are to love God with all our hearts, with all our souls and with all our might and to diligently teach our children the Torah commandments, speaking of them daily and keeping them close to our minds and close to our hearts. Just as the fringes on our prayer shawls are meant to remind us of our bond and are gathered up and held together, we are reminded that our Jewish identity should not be kept on the fringes of our lives, but brought close to our hearts, enveloping all that we do.

As our Seder comes to an end, we drink the fourth cup of wine. This cup recalls our covenant with God and the tasks that await us as a people called to service.

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p'ri ha-gafen.

All drink the fourth cup of wine

Nirtzah
Source : Unknown
Blessing the fourth cup

Group:

Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech ha’olam, borei p’ri hagafen.

Praised are you, Adonai, Lord of the universe, who has created the fruit of the vine.

Praised are you, Adonai, King of the universe, who has created our bodies in unique ways. Our bodies honor You when we treat them as gifts that You have given us. Help us be only concerned with what is pleasing to You, and not with what is pleasing to this world. Strengthen us to have the courage to be healthy. Have mercy, Adonai our God, on your people. Heal our bodies and rebuild our minds.

(Drink the fourth cup of wine)

Commentary / Readings
Source : http://www.utzedek.org/socialjusticetorah/uri-ltzedek-food-a-justice-haggadah-supplement.html
Chad Gadya

by Aliza Donath

Songs
by Allie
Source : Dayenu - short version

 

Ilu hotzi hotzianu hotzianu mimitzrayim, hotzianu mimitzrayim, DAYENU.

Ilu natan natan lanu, natan lanu et hashabat, natan lanu et hashabat, DAYENU.

Ilu natan natan lanu, natan lanu et hatorah, natan lanu et hatorah, DAYENU.

Songs
Source : Free Siddur Project, adapted

Adir hu, yivei baito b’karov. Bimheirah, bimheirah, b’yamainu b’karov. El b’nai, El b’nai, b’nai baitcha b’karov.


Bachur hu, gadol hu, dagul hu, yivei baito b’karov. Bimheirah, bimheirah, b’yamainu b’karov. El b’nai, El b’nai, b’nai baitcha b’karov.


Hadur hu, vatik hu, zakai hu, chasid hu, yivei baito b’karov. Bimheirah, bimheirah, b’yamainu b’karov. El b’nai, El b’nai, b’nai baitcha b’karov.


Tahor hu, yachid hu, kabir hu, lamud hu, melech hu yivei baito b’karov. Bimheirah, bimheirah, b’yamainu b’karov. El b’nai, El b’nai, b’nai baitcha b’karov.


Nora hu, sagiv hu, izuz hu, podeh hu, tzadik hu, yivei baito b’karov. Bimheirah, bimheirah, b’yamainu b’karov. El b’nai, El b’nai, b’nai baitcha b’karov.


Kadosh hu, rachum hu, shadai hu, takif hu yivei baito b’karov. Bimheirah, bimheirah, b’yamainu b’karov. El b’nai, El b’nai, b’nai baitcha b’karov.

Songs
Source : The Jewish Secular Community Passover Hagada

Lo yi-sa- goy el goy cher-ev

Lo yil-m' du od mil-cha-ma.  (repeat 6 times)

And every one,

'Neath their vine and fig tree

Shall live in peace and unafraid  (repeat 2 times)

And into plowshares

Beat their swords,

Nations shall learn war no more.  (repeat 2 times)

And every one,

'Neath their vine and fig tree

Shall live in peace and unafraid. (2 times)

Songs
Source : Foundation For Family Education, Inc.

One day king Pharaoh awoke in his bed,
There were frogs in his bed and frogs on his head.
Frogs on his nose and frogs on his toes.
Frogs here, frogs there,
Frogs were jumping everywhere.

Songs
Source : Free Siddur Project, adapted

Chad gadya, chad gadya.


D’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata shunra v’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata chalba v’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata chutra v’hika l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata nura v’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata maya v’chava l’nura,

d’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata tora v’shatah l’maya,

d’chava l’nura,

d’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah, 

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata hashocheit v’shachat l’tora,

d’shata l’maya,

d’chava l’nura,

d’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata malach hamavet v’shachat l’shocheit,

d’shachat l’tora,

d’shata l’maya,

d’chava l’nura,

d’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata Hakodesh Baruch Hu v’shachat l’malach hamavet,

d’shachat l’shocheit,

d’shachat l’tora,

d’shata l’maya,

d’chava l’nura,

d’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.

Songs
Source : http://www.sacred-texts.com/jud/uh/uh21.htm

An only kid! An only kid

My father bought for two zuzim 

Chad gadya, Chad gadya

Then came the cat and ate the kid

My father bought For two zuzim.

Chad gadya, Chad gadya

Then came the dog And bit the cat

That ate the kid

My father bought For two zuzim.

Chad gadya, Chad gadya

Then came the stick and beat the dog

That bit the cat that ate the kid

My father bought For two zuzim.

Chad gadya, Chad gadya

 Then came the fire and burned the stick

That beat the dog That bit the cat

That ate the kid

My father boughtFor two zuzim.

Chad gadya, Chad gadya

 Then came the water and quenched the fire

That burned the stick That beat the dog

That bit the cat That ate the kid

My father bought For two zuzim.

Chad gadya, Chad gadya

 Then came the ox and drank the water

That quenched the fire That burned the stick

That beat the dog That bit the cat

That ate the kid

My father boughtFor two zuzim.

Chad gadya, Chad gadya

8. Then came the butcher And killed the ox . . . 

9 Then came the angel of deathAnd slew the butcher . . 

10. Then came the Holy One, blest be He!And destroyed the angel of death . . 

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