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Introduction
Source : ritualwell.org
Candlelighting from Ritualwell

Blessing for Lighting Holiday Candles

Barukh Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech ha-Olam asher kid'shanu b'mitzvotav v'tzivanu l'hadlik neir shel (Shabbatv'shel)Yom Tov.

You are Blessed, O God, Spirit of the World, who makes us holy with mitzvot and commands us to kindle the light of (Shabbat and of) the festival day.

Next we recite, as we do each time we experience a new ritual or event, the Shehechiyanu:

Barukh Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech ha-Olam shehekheyanu v'kiy'manu v'higianu laz'man hazeh.

You are Blessed, Our God, Spirit of the World, who keeps us in life, who sustains us and who enables us to reach this season.

Introduction
Bless the children https://www.youtube.com/embed/618IKgQ2wys

Introduction

BLESS THE CHILDREN – FROM Fiddler on the Roof

E- A E-7 A May the Lord protect and defend you.

E- A E-7 A May God always shield you from shame.

E- A E-7 A7 D B7 May you come to be in Yisrael a shining name.

E- A E-7 A May you be like Ruth and like Ephrayim.

E- A E-7 A May you be deserving of praise.

E- A E-7 A D Strengthen them, O Lord, and teach them of our people's ways.

D C D May God bless you, and grant you long life

(C D May the Lord fulfill our Pesach prayer for you)

D C B7 May God keep you and shield you from strife.

(C B7 May God in God?s wisdom always care for you. )

E- A E-7 A May the Lord protect and defend you.

May God always shield you from shame.

E- A E- A Favor us, O Lord, Favor us, O Lord,

E- A E- A With happiness and peace. With happiness and peace.

C B7 E- A E-7 A O hear our Pesach prayer. A------men.

Introduction
Family Passover

From Rabbi Mordecai Kaplan’s Reconstructionist “New Haggadah,” published in 1941:

“On this night, long ago, our forefathers hearkened to the call of freedom. Tonight, that call rings out again, sounding its glorious challenge, commanding us to champion the call of all the oppressed and downtrodden.” 

Introduction
uptown funk https://www.youtube.com/embed/7Q7Jo7FkLH4

Introduction

We don't know how long this will last. They are a very festive people. –Elaine Benes

AN INTRODUCTION

About three thousand years ago, ancient Israelites fused a shepherds’ spring celebration of the birthing of lambs and a farmers’ spring celebration of the sprouting of barley into a spring celebration of their liberation from slavery and the downfall of a tyrant.

About two thousand years ago, the Jewish people reshaped that celebration into a Seder, a story and meal that could be eaten and told at home. The Passover story and celebration entered the memory stream of Christianity through the teachings of Jesus in the Last Supper, which seems to have been a Passover Seder. Still later, Islam welcomed Moses as a prophet.

In 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King was planning to take part in a Passover Seder with the family of Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel, who marched and prayed and struggled alongside him against racism an militarism in America. But ten days before the Seder, Dr. King was murdered.

“Prayer is meaningless unless it is subversive, unless it seeks to overthrow and to ruin the pyramids of callousness, hatred, opportunism, falsehoods. The liturgical movement must become a revolutionary movement, seeking to overthrow the forces that continue to destroy the promise, the hope, the vision.” -Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel, 1970

Passover allows us a chance to connect with each other and with ourselves, and to help us remember all the ways we enslave ourselves when we lapse into automatic, familiar thought patterns.

We enslave ourselves when we remain in  Mitzrayim,  the narrow place of confusion and disconnection with our own and others' essential nature. As human beings we all want to be happy and avoid suffering. In the Jewish tradition, ritual is used to bring us to an awareness of the present, and to connect us with our past. ( Contributed by Andrew Marantz )

[RABBI'S OPENING MONOLOGUE IN 'ANGELS OF AMERICA' ABOUT THE DEATH OF SARAH IRONSON]

This good and righteous woman... she was not a person, but a whole kind of a person - the ones that crossed the ocean that brought with us to America, the villages of Russia and Lithuania. And how we struggled! And how we fought! For the family... for the Jewish home! Descendants of this immigrant woman, you do not grow up in America - you and your children, and their children with their goyische names. You do not live in America - no such a place exists. Your clay is the clay of some litvak shtetl, and your air is the air of the steppes, because she carried that Old World on her back, across the ocean, in a boat! And she put it down on Grand Concourse Avenue... on Flatbush. You can never make that crossing that she made, for such great voyages in this world do not any more exist. But every day of your lives, the miles - that voyage from that place to this one - you cross. Every day! You understand me? In you, that journey... is ( Contributed by Marlene Edelstein )

"LOVE POEM,"BY WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS

Sweep the house clean,

hang fresh curtains in the windows

put on a new dress and come with me!

The elm is scattering its little loaves

of sweet smells from a white sky!

Who shall hear of us in the time to come?

Let him say there was a burst of fragrance

from black branches. ( Contributed byRobin Marantz Henig & Jeff Henig)

THE ORDER OF THE EVENING

Our Passover meal is called a seder , which means “order” in Hebrew, because we go through 14 specific steps as we retell the story of our ancestors’ liberation from slavery in Egypt.

Some people like to begin their seder by reciting or singing the names of the 14 steps – this will help you keep track of how far away the main course is!

Kiddush (the blessing over wine) | kadeish |קַדֵּשׁ

Ritual hand-washing in preparation for the seder | urchatz |וּרְחַץ

Dipping a green vegetable in salt water| karpas |כַּרְפַּס

Breaking the middle matzah | yachatz |יַחַץ

Telling the story of Passover | magid |מַגִּיד

Ritual hand-washing in preparation for the meal | rachtza |רָחְצָה

The blessing over the meal and matzah | motzi matzah |מוֹצִיא מַצָּה

Dipping the bitter herb in sweet charoset | maror |מָרוֹר

Eating a sandwich of matzah and bitter herb | koreich |כּוֹרֵךְ

Eating the meal! | shulchan oreich |שֻׁלְחָן עוֹרֵךְ

Finding and eating the Afikomen | tzafoon |צָפוּן

Saying grace after the meal and inviting Elijah the Prophet | bareich |בָּרֵךְ

Singing songs that praise God | hallel |הַלֵּל

Ending the seder and thinking about the future | nirtzah |נִרְצָה

Introduction

In the Temple Days the spiritual pilgrimage reached its climax at the 15 stairs leading up to the Holy of Holies. On these steps the musicians of the tribe of Levi played and sang Shir HaMa'alot, the 'Song of the Steps.' Reaching a spiritually worthwhile destination requires a process, an effort to achieve new heights. One cannot expect to sense the power of the seder without strenuous preparations beforehand. We are grateful tonight for the preparation that has come before, not just today, or this week, but the generations who have paved the way for us to be here today. Let's take a moment now, to share what we are grateful for today.

Introduction

Subject: Knighted by the Queen

A British Jew is waiting in line to be knighted by the Queen. He is to kneel in front of her and recite a sentence in Latin when she taps him on the shoulders with her sword. However, when his turn comes, he panics in the excitement of the moment and forgets the Latin. Then, thinking fast, he recites the only other sentence he knows in a foreign language, which he remembers from the Passover seder:

“Ma nishtana ha layla ha zeh mi kol ha laylot."


Puzzled, Her Majesty turns to her advisor and whispers, “Why is this knight different from all other knights?"

Kadesh
Source : Deborah Putnoi Art
First Cup of Wine

Kadesh
Source : Mix

It’s been a crazy week. The world with all its worries and bothers is still clamoring for your attention. The first step is to forget all that. Leave it behind. Enter into a timeless space, where you, your great-grandparents and Moses   all coincide.

The beginning of all journeys is separation. You’ve got to leave somewhere to go somewhere else. It is also the first step towards freedom: You ignore the voice of Pharaoh inside that mocks you, saying, “Who are you to begin such a journey?” You just get up and walk out.

This is the first meaning of the word, “Kadesh” -- to  transcend   the mundane world. Then comes the second meaning: Once you’ve set yourself free from your material worries, you can return and  sanctify   them. That is when true spiritual freedom begins, when you introduce a higher purpose into all those things you do. 

Kiddush (the blessing over wine) |  kadeish  | קַדֵּשׁ  

All Jewish celebrations, from holidays to weddings, include wine as a symbol of our joy – not to mention a practical way to increase that joy. The seder starts with wine and then gives us three more opportunities to refill our cup and drink.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who chose us from all peoples and languages, and sanctified us with commandments, and lovingly gave to us special times for happiness, holidays and this time of celebrating the Holiday of Matzah, the time of liberation, reading our sacred stories, and remembering the Exodus from Egypt. For you chose us and sanctified us among all peoples. And you have given us joyful holidays. We praise God, who sanctifies the people of Israel and the holidays.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם,  שֶׁהֶחֱיָנוּ וְקִיְּמָנוּ וְהִגִּיעָנוּ לַזְּמַן הַזֶּה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, she-hechiyanu v’key’manu v’higiyanu lazman hazeh.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who has kept us alive, raised us up, and brought us to this happy moment.

Drink the first glass of wine!

Urchatz
Source : Original
Urchatz

Urchatz

Water is refreshing, cleansing, and clear, so it’s easy to understand why so many cultures and religions use water for symbolic purification. We will wash our hands twice during our seder: now, with no blessing, to get us ready for the rituals to come; and then again later, we’ll wash again with a blessing, preparing us for the meal, which Judaism thinks of as a ritual in itself.

Karpas
Source : Deborah Putnoi Art
Karpas Image

Karpas
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

Passover, like many of our holidays, combines the celebration of an event from our Jewish memory with a recognition of the cycles of nature. As we remember the liberation from Egypt, we also recognize the stirrings of spring and rebirth happening in the world around us. The symbols on our table bring together elements of both kinds of celebration.

We now take a vegetable, representing our joy at the dawning of spring after our long, cold winter. Most families use a green vegetable, such as parsley or celery, but some families from Eastern Europe have a tradition of using a boiled potato since greens were hard to come by at Passover time. Whatever symbol of spring and sustenance we’re using, we now dip it into salt water, a symbol of the tears our ancestors shed as slaves. Before we eat it, we recite a short blessing:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הָאֲדָמָה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree ha-adama.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruits of the earth.

We look forward to spring and the reawakening of flowers and greenery. They haven’t been lost, just buried beneath the snow, getting ready for reappearance just when we most needed them.

-

We all have aspects of ourselves that sometimes get buried under the stresses of our busy lives. What has this winter taught us? What elements of our own lives do we hope to revive this spring?

Yachatz
Source : Design by Haggadot.com
Yachatz

Yachatz
Source : Barry Louis Polisar "Telling the Story: A Passover Haggadah Explained"

On Passover, we have three matzot on the table; the third matzoh is the “bread of affliction” reminding us of our enslavement in Egypt. We now take the middle of the three matzot and break it in two. By breaking “bread” we signify hospitality and invite all who are hungry to join us. The smaller piece of matzoh is replaced between the other two matzot. The larger piece is wrapped in a napkin — symbolic of our ancestors wrapping their dough in their garments when they departed Egypt — and set aside as the “afikomen” to be eaten after the meal. Together we say the words which join us with our people and with all who are in need.

All recite these words:

Behold the Matzoh, bread of poverty and affliction which our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt. Let all who are hungry come and eat. Let all who are needy share the hope of this Passover celebration. Next year may all men and women be free.

The wine glasses are refilled

Maggid - Beginning

Raise the tray with the matzot and say:

הָא לַחְמָא עַנְיָא דִי אֲכָלוּ אַבְהָתָנָא בְּאַרְעָא דְמִצְרָיִם. כָּל דִכְפִין יֵיתֵי וְיֵיכֹל, כָּל דִצְרִיךְ יֵיתֵי וְיִפְסַח. הָשַׁתָּא הָכָא, לְשָׁנָה הַבָּאָה בְּאַרְעָא דְיִשְׂרָאֵל. הָשַׁתָּא עַבְדֵי, לְשָׁנָה הַבָּאָה בְּנֵי חוֹרִין.

Ha lachma anya dee achalu avhatana b'ara d'meetzrayeem. Kol deechfeen yeitei v'yeichol, kol deetzreech yeitei v'yeefsach. Hashata hacha, l'shanah haba-ah b'ara d'yisra-el. Hashata avdei, l'shanah haba-ah b'nei choreen.

This is the bread of affliction, which our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt. Let all who are hungry come and eat. Let all who are in need, come and share the Pesach meal. This year, we are here. Next year, in the land of Israel. This year, we are slaves. Next year, we will be free.

Refill the wine cups, but don’t drink yet.

Maggid - Beginning

WHAT CAN these words mean?

We are slaves because yesterday our people were in slavery, and memory makes yesterday real for us.

We are slaves because today there are still people in chains around the world and no one can be truly free while others are in chains.

We are slaves because freedom means more than broken chains. Where there is poverty and hunger and homelessness, there is no freedom; where there is prejudice and bigotry and discrimination, there is no freedom; where there is violence and torture and war, there is no freedom.

If these things be so, who among us can say that he or she is free?

(adapted from Leonard Fein, founder of MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger, 1985 in  The Family Participation Haggadah )

-- Four Questions
-- Four Questions
Source : JewishBoston.com

The formal telling of the story of Passover is framed as a discussion with lots of questions and answers. The tradition that the youngest person asks the questions reflects the centrality of involving everyone in the seder. The rabbis who created the set format for the seder gave us the Four Questions to help break the ice in case no one had their own questions. Asking questions is a core tradition in Jewish life. If everyone at your seder is around the same age, perhaps the person with the least seder experience can ask them – or everyone can sing them all together.

מַה נִּשְׁתַּנָּה הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה מִכָּל הַלֵּילות

Ma nishtana halaila hazeh mikol haleilot?

Why is this night different from all other nights?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכלין חָמֵץ וּמַצָּה  הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה כֻּלּוֹ מצה  

Shebichol haleilot anu ochlin chameitz u-matzah. Halaila hazeh kulo matzah.

On all other nights we eat both leavened bread and matzah.
Tonight we only eat matzah.

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכְלִין שְׁאָר יְרָקוֹת הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה מָרוֹר

Shebichol haleilot anu ochlin shi’ar yirakot haleila hazeh maror.

On all other nights we eat all kinds of vegetables,
but tonight we eat bitter herbs.

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אֵין אָֽנוּ מַטְבִּילִין אֲפִילוּ פַּֽעַם אחָת  הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה שְׁתֵּי פְעמים

Shebichol haleilot ain anu matbilin afilu pa-am echat. Halaila hazeh shtei fi-amim.

On all other nights we aren’t expected to dip our vegetables one time.
Tonight we do it twice.

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכְלִין בֵּין יוֹשְׁבִין וּבֵין מְסֻבִּין.  :הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה כֻּלָּֽנוּ מְסֻבין

Shebichol haleilot anu ochlin bein yoshvin uvein m’subin. Halaila hazeh kulanu m’subin.

On all other nights we eat either sitting normally or reclining.
Tonight we recline.

-- Four Children
Source : http://www.jr.co.il/humor/pass01.txt

The Ballad of the Four Sons (to the tune of "Clementine")

Said the father to his children, "At the seder you will dine, You will eat your fill of matzoh, you will drink four cups of wine."

Now this father had no daughters, but his sons they numbered four.

One was wise and one was wicked, one was simple and a bore.

And the fourth was sweet and winsome, he was young and he was small.

While his brothers asked the questions he could scarcely speak at all.

Said the wise one to his father, "Would you please explain the laws? Of the customs of the seder, will you please explain the cause?"

And the father proudly answered, "As our fathers ate in speed, Ate the paschal lamb 'ere midnight, and from slavery were freed."

So we follow their example, and 'ere midnight must complete All the seder and we should not, after 12 remain to eat.

Then did sneer the son so wicked, "What does all this mean to you?"

And the father's voice was bitter, as his grief and anger grew. "If you yourself don't consider, a son of Israel, Then for you this has no meaning, you could be a slave as well."

Then the simple son said simply, "What is this," and quietly The good father told his offspring, "We were freed from slavery."

But the youngest son was silent, for he could not ask at all. His bright eyes were bright with wonder as his father told him all.

My dear children, heed the lesson and remember ever more What the father told his children told his sons that numbered four.

-- Four Children
Source : ajws.org.
At Passover each year, we read the story of our ancestors’ pursuit of liberation from oppression. When confronting this history, how do we answer our children when they ask us how to pursue justice in our time?

WHAT DOES THE ACTIVIST CHILD ASK?

“The Torah tells me, ‘Justice, justice you shall pursue,’ but how can I pursue justice?”Empower him always to seek pathways to advocate for the vulnerable. As Proverbs teaches, “Speak up for the mute, for the rights of the unfortunate. Speak up, judge righteously, champion the poor and the needy.”

WHAT DOES THE SKEPTICAL CHILD ASK?

“How can I solve problems of such enormity?” Encourage her by explaining that she need not solve the problems, she must only do what she is capable of doing.   As we read in Pirke Avot, “It is not your responsibility to complete the work, but neither are you free to desist from it.”

WHAT DOES THE INDIFFERENT CHILD SAY?

“It’s not my responsibility.”Persuade him that responsibility cannot be shirked. As Abraham Joshua Heschel writes, “The opposite of good is not evil, the opposite of good is indifference. In a free society where terrible wrongs exist, some are guilty, but all are responsible.”

AND THE UNINFORMED CHILD WHO DOES NOT KNOW HOW TO ASK...

Prompt her to see herself as an inheritor of our people’s legacy.  As it says in Deuteronomy, “You must befriend the stranger, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt.”At this season of liberation, join us in working for the liberation of all people. Let us respond to our children’s questions with action and justice. 

-- Four Children
Source : Boston Jewish Community

Do you see yourself in any of these children? At times we all approach different situations like each of these children. How do we relate to each of them?

-- Exodus Story
Source : http://www.bricktestament.com/exodus/
Exodus story in LEGO

Sefer Shemot illustrated through LEGOs
-- Exodus Story
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

Our story starts in ancient times, with Abraham, the first person to have the idea that maybe all those little statues his contemporaries worshiped as gods were just statues. The idea of one God, invisible and all-powerful, inspired him to leave his family and begin a new people in Canaan, the land that would one day bear his grandson Jacob’s adopted name, Israel.

God had made a promise to Abraham that his family would become a great nation, but this promise came with a frightening vision of the troubles along the way: “Your descendants will dwell for a time in a land that is not their own, and they will be enslaved and afflicted for four hundred years; however, I will punish the nation that enslaved them, and afterwards they shall leave with great wealth."

Raise the glass of wine and say:

וְהִיא שֶׁעָמְדָה לַאֲבוֹתֵֽינוּ וְלָֽנוּ

V’hi she-amda l’avoteinu v’lanu.

This promise has sustained our ancestors and us.

For not only one enemy has risen against us to annihilate us, but in every generation there are those who rise against us. But God saves us from those who seek to harm us.

The glass of wine is put down.

In the years our ancestors lived in Egypt, our numbers grew, and soon the family of Jacob became the People of Israel. Pharaoh and the leaders of Egypt grew alarmed by this great nation growing within their borders, so they enslaved us. We were forced to perform hard labor, perhaps even building pyramids. The Egyptians feared that even as slaves, the Israelites might grow strong and rebel. So Pharaoh decreed that Israelite baby boys should be drowned, to prevent the Israelites from overthrowing those who had enslaved them.

But God heard the cries of the Israelites. And God brought us out of Egypt with a strong hand and outstretched arm, with great awe, miraculous signs and wonders. God brought us out not by angel or messenger, but through God’s own intervention. 

-- Exodus Story
-- Exodus Story
Joseph https://www.youtube.com/embed/va6QtO9UYCw

-- Exodus Story

Round Robin Reading:

Many Jews begin the story of Passover by recounting the story of Joseph. How Joseph’s older brothers sold him as a slave to Midianite merchants on their way to Egypt. In Egypt, Joseph interpreted the dreams of the Pharaoh, gained respectability, power and wealth for himself and encouraged Hebrews to migrate to Egypt.

After Joseph’s death subsequent rulers changed their policies, regarded the Hebrews as foreigners, and feared the rapid growth in their number as a threat to the security of government. The pharaohs reduced the Hebrews to slavery, creating oppression and immense suffering among them. However, the most familiar story of Passover commences several hundred years after the death of Joseph. The traditional story of Passover begins with the birth of Moses, the son of Amram and Yocheved.

At the time Moses was born, the pharaoh, in fear of continued increased growth in the Hebrew slave population, ordered the death of all male Hebrew babies. At birth, Moses was hidden by his older sister, Miriam, and his older brother, Aaron. However when it was apparent that Moses would soon be killed, he was placed in a small basket and hidden among the reeds in the shallow waters of the Nile. Moses was soon found by the Pharoah’s daughter who took him in, and adopted him as her own. Miriam, seeing the pharaoh’s daughter find Moses, suggested to the pharaoh’s daughter that she get a Hebrew woman to nurse and rear him. The Hebrew woman selected to raise Moses was none other than his real mother, Yocheved.

Although the Book of Exodus is silent concerning the boyhood of Moses, the career of Moses generally falls into three periods of 40 years each. The first period was the years of training and preparation in Egypt. The second period was spent in the land of Midian. The third period was the return of Moses to Egypt and the freeing of the Jews from Egyptian bondage and bringing them to the land God promised.

When Moses was 40 years old, he saw an Egyptian beating a slave. In anger, Moses slew the Egyptian and was forced to flee to the wilderness of Midian, an area in the Sinai Peninsula, desolate and barren. In Midian, Moses became a shepherd, married Tzipporah, the daughter of Yitro, the priest of Midian, and had two sons.

For 40 years Moses lived the quiet life of a shepherd, learning the ways of the desert tribes, the sources of food and water and becoming familiar with the land through which he would later lead the Hebrews in their flight of freedom from bondage. The years in the wilderness of Midian were brought to an end in an experience near Mt. Horeb.

While tending his flock, Moses saw a bush burning with fire, but was puzzled to discover that it was not being consumed. It was at this holy place of the burning bush where God first spoke to Moses telling him to return to Egypt and to deliver his people from bondage. With these words, Moses left Midian to return to Egypt.

On his return to Egypt, Moses found that the Hebrews had lost consciousness of their race, and their confidence had been nearly destroyed by the many years of servitude. Moses, with the help of Aaron, immediately began to build up the Hebrews’ morale and to persuade them that they could, and must, leave Egypt.

Even though Moses was eventually able to persuade the Hebrews to leave Egypt, he was still faced with the problems of persuading the pharaoh to allow them to leave. Once Moses established his leadership among the Hebrews, he then appeared before pharaoh, seeking his consent for the Hebrews to leave Egypt. Pharaoh not only refused, but he ordered the taskmasters to increase the work requirement of the Hebrew slaves.

In order to overcome the resistance of the pharaoh, God, through Moses, delivered ten plagues to the people of Egypt. With the coming of each plague, the pharaoh gave his consent for the Hebrews to leave; however, when the plague was stayed, the pharaoh changed his mind until a more severe pestilence was sent.

(Spill out of the cup one drop of wine while saying each of the ten plagues)

Question for discussion: Why do we spill our a drop of wine at each plague?

-- Exodus Story
Prince of Egypt https://www.youtube.com/embed/Rp5VsqVOu5s

-- Exodus Story
moses as a baby in the river https://www.youtube.com/embed/92ygYJw9CSE

-- Exodus Story
by Jenny
Source : http://www.adatshalom.net/holidays/pesachsongs.html

Listen King Pharoah (Shirley Cohen)

Oh listen, oh listen Oh listen King Pharoah!

Oh listen, oh listen Please let my people go. 

They want to go away,

They work too hard all day.

King Pharoah, King Pharoah,

What do you say?

 "No, No, No. I will not let them go."

" No, no, no, he will not let them go."

-- Ten Plagues
Source : http://animal-kid.com/ and http://earlychildhoodlibrarian.blogspot.com
Frog Song

One morning when Pharaoh awoke in his bed [pantomine stretching]
There were frogs on his bed and frogs on his head [hands outstretched, on head]
Frogs on his nose and frogs on his toes [nose, toes]
Frogs here [one hand]
Frogs there [other hand]
Frogs were jumping everywhere. [jump all over]

-- Ten Plagues
Source : The Wandering is Over

As we rejoice at our deliverance from slavery, we acknowledge that our freedom was hard-earned. We regret that our freedom came at the cost of the Egyptians’ suffering, for we are all human beings made in the image of God. We pour out a drop of wine for each of the plagues as we recite them.

Blood | dam | דָּם

Frogs | tzfardeiya | צְפַרְדֵּֽעַ

Lice | kinim | כִּנִּים

Beasts | arov | עָרוֹב

Cattle disease | dever | דֶּֽבֶר

Boils | sh’chin | שְׁחִין

Hail | barad | בָּרָד

Locusts | arbeh | אַרְבֶּה

Darkness | choshech | חֹֽשֶׁךְ

Death of the Firstborn | makat b’chorot | מַכַּת בְּכוֹרוֹת

-- Ten Plagues
Plagues (prince of Egypt) https://www.youtube.com/embed/Bcg5rN-jlaw

-- Ten Plagues
part the red sea https://www.youtube.com/embed/OqCTq3EeDcY

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

The plagues and our subsequent redemption from Egypt are but one example of the care God has shown for us in our history. Had God but done any one of these kindnesses, it would have been enough – dayeinu.

אִלּוּ הוֹצִיאָֽנוּ מִמִּצְרַֽיִם, דַּיֵּנוּ

Ilu hotzi- hotzianu, Hotzianu mi-mitzrayim Hotzianu mi-mitzrayim, Dayeinu

If God had only taken us out of Egypt, that would have been enough!

אִלּוּ נָתַן לָֽנוּ אֶת־הַתּוֹרָה, דַּיֵּנוּ

Ilu natan natan lanu, natan lanu et ha-Torah, Natan lanu et ha-Torah , Dayeinu

If God had only given us the Torah, that would have been enough.

 The complete lyrics to Dayeinu tell the entire story of the Exodus from Egypt as a series of miracles God performed for us. (See the Additional Readings if you want to read or sing them all.)

Dayeinu also reminds us that each of our lives is the cumulative result of many blessings, small and large. 

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
doyen https://www.youtube.com/embed/CZgDNPGZ9Sg

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

We have now told the story of Passover…but wait! We’re not quite done. There are still some symbols on our seder plate we haven’t talked about yet. Rabban Gamliel would say that whoever didn’t explain the shank bone, matzah, and marror (or bitter herbs) hasn’t done Passover justice.

The shank bone represents the Pesach, the special lamb sacrifice made in the days of the Temple for the Passover holiday. It is called the pesach, from the Hebrew word meaning “to pass over,” because God passed over the houses of our ancestors in Egypt when visiting plagues upon our oppressors.

The matzah reminds us that when our ancestors were finally free to leave Egypt, there was no time to pack or prepare. Our ancestors grabbed whatever dough was made and set out on their journey, letting their dough bake into matzah as they fled.

The bitter herbs provide a visceral reminder of the bitterness of slavery, the life of hard labor our ancestors experienced in Egypt.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Susannah Heschel
The Orange

Six items traditionally adorn the Seder plate.  Some have roots in ancient Egypt.  Some have roots in the turning of the seasons from later influences in the harvest.  Long after Egypt, we lived among the Persians whose New Year falls on the spring equinox.  Persians place severn items on a special cloth, including the egg of fertility and greens to celebrate.  It is hard to discern which customs we borrowed from our neighbors and which they adapted from us.  

The newest symbol on the Seder plate is the Orange.  In our own days, the scholar Susannah Heschel instituted this custom as a means of inclusion.  Just as the orange has segments and seeds, so do our people.  

In the 1980's, Susannah Heschel was invited to lecture at Oberlin College in Ohio.  "While on campus, I came across a Haggadah written by students to express feminist concerns.  One ritual they devised was placing a crust of bread on the Seder plate as a sign of solidarity with Jewish lesbians.  They reasoned:  There is as much room for a lesbian in Judaism as there is for a crust of bread on the Seder plate.   But bread on the Seder plate brings an end to Pesach.  It renders everything  chometz, and suggests that being a lesbian is being transgressive, violating Judaism.  

At the next Passover, I placed an orange on our family's Seder plate. I asked everyone to take a segment of the orange, make the blessing over fruit and eat it as a gesture of solidarity with other who are marginalized within the Jewish community.  I felt that an orange was suggestive of something else: The fruitfulness for all Jews when each and everyone one of us are contributing and active members of Jewish life.  In addition, each orange segment had a few seeds that had to be spit out - a gesture repudiating the exclusion within Judaism."

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Original Illustration from Haggadot.com
Old & New Passover Symbols

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : JQ International GLBT Haggadah

The traditional Seder plate contains…             

Bitter Herbs - מָרוֹר

Egg - בֵּיצָה

Parsley - כַּרְפַּס

Greens - יְרָקוֹת

Charoset - חֲרֹסֶת

Shank bone – זְרוֹעַ

When the hardships imposed by the Pharaoh did not slow down the population growth of the Israelites, Pharaoh then decreed that all Israelite males born should be killed. However, the Israelite midwives – Shifra and Puah – who were ordered by Pharaoh to be in charge of this task, feared the wrath of God and made sure that this did not happen. The Pharaoh then ordered his people to throw every male child born to an Israelite in the Nile River. Pharaoh was afraid that Israelite males would grow up to become fighters against his regime. Pharaoh spared Israelite girls because he doubted they would become fighters against his regime, and he thought they would marry Egyptian men and adopt Egyptian values.

But they did not! Baruch Ha’shem…

As human beings today, we reflect with great distance on the hardship of our ancient ancestors but with great commitment we spend a significant amount of energy retelling and remembering their suffering and story of perseverance annually. As we make great efforts to celebrate and commemorate, we also turn and look at our recent history and the stories that surround our collective struggle to bring equality and respect to all people regardless of race, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion and any other divisible way we segment ourselves in our modern lives.

The GLBT community has made great strides in the last half century to receive recognition, acceptance and respect as human beings and within the Jewish community great attempts have been made to further inclusion efforts within the community on spiritual and cultural fronts. We sit here today to celebrate, commemorate and further commit ourselves to making all people welcome and respected here at this table and everywhere we can in our everyday lives.

As GLBT community members, allies, friends and family of the GLBT community, our second Seder Plate symbolically represents our lives, our struggles and our progress here and now.

Our GLBT Seder plate contains…

Orange - תַּפּוּז

Coconut - קוֹקוֹס

Sour Vegetables - חֲמוּצִים

Fruit Salad - סָלַט פֵּרוֹת

Sticks and Stones - זֶרֶדִים וְאֶבֶנִים

Flowers – פְּרָחִים

 

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : JQ International, Photo Courtesy of the Jewish Journal
The GLBT Seder Plate

The JQ GLBT seder plate includes some special symbolic items including:

  • An Orangewhich carries the seeds of rebirth and represents the diversity of the Jewish community as we increase inclusion.
  • A Coconutfor the LGBT still in the closet and their struggle in coming out
  • Sour Vegetablesfor the flavor of hatred and bigotry
  • Fruit Saladfor our collective potential and recognition
  • Flowers, Sticks and Stonesfor the path all of us as LGBT and Allies are on as we move through life and play our role in the development of our culture and commemoration of our history.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

Reader: Miriam’s Cup. Filled with water, it evokes the miracles of past and present. It compliments Elijah’s Cup, which is filled with wine to represent our hope for redemption.

Reader: A Midrash teaches us that a miraculous well accompanied the Children of Israel throughout their journey in the desert, providing them with water. This well was given by God to Miriam, the prophetess, to honor her bravery and devotion to the Jewish people. Both Miriam and her well were spiritual oases in the desert, sources of sustenance and healing. Her words of comfort gave the Children of Israel the faith and confidence to overcome the hardships of the Exodus.

Reader: We fill Miriam's cup with water to honor her role in ensuring the survival of the Jewish people. Like Miriam, Jewish women in all generations have been essential for the continuity of our people. As keepers of traditions in the home, women passed down songs and stories, rituals and recipes, from mother to daughter, from generation to generation.

Reader: When Miriam dies, the Children of Israel are immediately without water in the dessert. It is as if nature mourns along with the people.

Reader: Let us each fill the cup of Miriam with water from our own glasses, drawing from the strength and wisdom of our heritage.

As the cup is passed, we pool our resources, saying your Hebrew name. Some people use Miriam’s Cup as
an opportunity to pray for healing or to express gratitude for everyday blessings (like water!)

ALL: "You abound in blessings, God, creator of the universe, Who sustains us with living water. May we, like the children of Israel leaving Egypt, be guarded and nurtured and kept alive in the wilderness, and may You give us wisdom to understand that the journey itself holds the promise of redemption. AMEN." (Susan Schnur)

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

בְּכָל־דּוֹר וָדוֹר חַיָּב אָדָם לִרְאוֹת אֶת־עַצְמוֹ, כְּאִלּוּ הוּא יָצָא מִמִּצְרָֽיִם

B’chol dor vador chayav adam lirot et-atzmo, k’ilu hu yatzav mimitzrayim.

In every generation, everyone is obligated to see themselves as though they personally left Egypt.

The seder reminds us that it was not only our ancestors whom God redeemed; God redeemed us too along with them. That’s why the Torah says “God brought us out from there in order to lead us to and give us the land promised to our ancestors.”

---

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who redeemed us and our ancestors from Egypt, enabling us to reach this night and eat matzah and bitter herbs. May we continue to reach future holidays in peace and happiness.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the second glass of wine!

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : (from Miriam's Cup: Passover Seder)

B'TZEIT YISRAEIL
Traditional melody
Lyrics from Psalm 114:1-4

[Chorus (2x)]
B'tzeit Yis-ra-eil mi-Mitz-ra-yim
Beit Ya-a-kov mei-am lo-eiz

Ha-y'ta (2x) Y'hu-da l'kod-sho Yis-ra-eil mam-sh'lo-tav
Ha-yam (2x) ra-a va-ya-nos
Ha-Yar-dein yi-sov l'a-chor
[Repeat Chorus]

He-ha-rim rak'du ch'ei-lim g'va-ot kiv-nei tzon (2x)
[Repeat Chorus]

When Israel went out of Egypt, when the house of Jacob emerged from a babel of tongues, Judah became God's dwelling place, Israel, God's dominion. The sea looked and fled. the Jordan turned back. The mountains danced like lambs, the hills like young sheep.

Rachtzah
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

As we now transition from the formal telling of the Passover story to the celebratory meal, we once again wash our hands to prepare ourselves. In Judaism, a good meal together with friends and family is itself a sacred act, so we prepare for it just as we prepared for our holiday ritual, recalling the way ancient priests once prepared for service in the Temple.

Some people distinguish between washing to prepare for prayer and washing to prepare for food by changing the way they pour water on their hands. For washing before food, pour water three times on your right hand and then three times on your left hand.

After you have poured the water over your hands, recite this short blessing.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו, וְצִוָּנוּ  עַל נְטִילַת יָדָֽיִם

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al n’tilat yadayim.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to wash our hands.

Motzi-Matzah
Source : JewishBoston.com

The blessing over the meal and matzah | motzi matzah | מוֹצִיא מַצָּה

The familiar hamotzi blessing marks the formal start of the meal. Because we are using matzah instead of bread, we add a blessing celebrating this mitzvah.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, הַמּוֹצִיא לֶֽחֶם מִן הָאָֽרֶץ

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, hamotzi lechem min ha-aretz.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who brings bread from the land.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתַָיו וְצִוָּֽנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מַצָּה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat matzah.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to eat matzah.

Distribute and eat the top and middle matzah for everyone to eat.

Motzi-Matzah
20 things to do with matzah https://www.youtube.com/embed/xMSEFCQCKPo

Maror
Source : Lisa Baptiste & Laura Horowitz

Why do we eat maror?

Tradition says that this bitter herb is to remind us of the bitterness of our slavery.

We force ourselves to taste pain so that we may more readily value pleasure.

How big a piece of maror do I have to eat to fulfill my obligation?

And what if I"ve known enough pain this year already?

And what if I eat the whole root and my tongue catches on fire and my ears burn? Then will I know slavery?

All take a taste of maror on a piece of matzah, then we'll say together:

ברוּךְ אַתָּה יְיַָ אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָּֽנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מרוֹר:

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat maror.

Blessed are you, Eternal our God, Ruler of the universe, who has sanctified us with your commandments, and commanded us to eat bitter herbs.

Koreich
Source : Leah Rosenthal in http://elmad.pardes.org/2016/04/the-pardes-companion-to-the-haggadah/
After performing most of the central mitzvot of the evening (telling the story of the Exodus eating matza and maror, etc.) and just before we are about to enjoy the festive holiday meal, the haggadah structures a moment in which we symbolically repeat the practice of Hillel the Elder who would “wrap” his portion of the paschal offering with matza and maror and eat it as a type of sandwich, in literal fulfillment of the verse “it shall be eaten on matzot and maror”. We too prepare a combination of matza and maror (and haroset) and eat in remembrance of this practice and of the Pesach tradition during the time when the Temple still stood.

Let us pause a moment to consider the character of Hillel, a central and formative personality within the pantheon of Rabbinic figures, and to consider why, perhaps, the haggadah asks us to spend a moment recreating Hillel’s personal practice of eating the Pesach sacrifice.

Hillel, founder of the great and influential Beit Hillel, is well known for his personal qualities of tolerance, humility and pursuit of peace. Many of the tales of Hillel and his teachings reflect this characterization. This is expressed in famous citations such as: “Hillel says: Be of the disciples of Aaron, loving peace and pursuing peace, loving your fellow creatures and drawing them near to the law.” The quality of being a rodef shalom (pursuer of peace) requires the ability to recognize the value of different perspectives and the skill of unifying conflicting truths into a harmonious whole. It requires the recognition that single individuals perceive only a portion of the complete truth. Hillel says: “If I am not for myself, who is for me? And when I am for myself, what am I? And if not now, when?"

The Rabbis of the Talmudic world joined Hillel in this understanding, promoting this view and ruling that Halakha (Jewish law) should follow Beit Hillel as “…they were kindly and modest, they studied their own rulings and those of Beit Shammai (Hillel’s halakhic opponent), and were even “...so [humble] as to mention the actions of Beit Shammai before their own." Appropriately, the haggadah depicts Hillel as requiring the consumption of the Pesach sacrifice the food of redemption, through an act of combining − the korekh. Only the harmonious merging of a variety of components produces the true redemptive experience

Leah Rosenthal teaches Talmud

Koreich
Source : http://www.beliefnet.com/Faiths/Judaism/2009/03/Unique-Passover-Traditions.aspx?p=2, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/04/08/to

In Cuba, Jews are poor and can't access all of the fruits needed to make Charoset, so they use matzah, honey, cinnamon, and wine instead. In Gibraltar, a British overseas territory on the coast of Spain, they put brick dust in Charoset to resemble the mortar used during slavery. In India, Charoset contains raisins, dates, and sesame paste. In Spain, they put dates, apricots, pistachios, pine nuts, and coconuts in the Charoset.

Shulchan Oreich
Source : JewishBoston.com

Eating the meal! | shulchan oreich | שֻׁלְחָן עוֹרֵךְ

Enjoy! But don’t forget when you’re done we’ve got a little more seder to go, including the final two cups of wine!

Tzafun
Source : JewishBoston.com

Finding and eating the Afikomen | tzafoon | צָפוּן

The playfulness of finding the afikomen reminds us that we balance our solemn memories of slavery with a joyous celebration of freedom. As we eat the afikomen, our last taste of matzah for the evening, we are grateful for moments of silliness and happiness in our lives.

Tzafun
afikomen https://www.youtube.com/embed/mxXuey5aJHQ

Bareich
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

Refill everyone’s wine glass.

We now say grace after the meal, thanking God for the food we’ve eaten. On Passover, this becomes something like an extended toast to God, culminating with drinking our third glass of wine for the evening:

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, whose goodness sustains the world. You are the origin of love and compassion, the source of bread for all. Thanks to You, we need never lack for food; You provide food enough for everyone. We praise God, source of food for everyone.

As it says in the Torah: When you have eaten and are satisfied, give praise to your God who has given you this good earth. We praise God for the earth and for its sustenance.

Renew our spiritual center in our time. We praise God, who centers us.

May the source of peace grant peace to us, to the Jewish people, and to the entire world. Amen.

The Third Glass of Wine

The blessing over the meal is immediately followed by another blessing over the wine:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the third glass of wine!

Bareich

Eliyahu and Miriam

We open the door and invite Eliyahu and Miriam into our homes. To show how truly free we are, we send our youngest to open the door. 

Elijah the prophet - may we create a world where everyone experiences redemption and freedom, growth and possibility. Let all who are hungry be fed, let all who are bereaved be comforted, let all who suffer find release.

Miriam the prophet - may we support a world in which our resources are shared widely, where water scarcity is turned into abundance, where we do not turn away from anyone in need.

אֵלִיָהוּ הַנָבִיא, אֵלִיָהוּ הַתִּשְׁבִּי
אֵלִיָהוּ אֵלִיָהוּאֵלִיָהוּהַגִלְעָדִי
בִּמְהֵרָה בימינויָבוֹא אֵלֵינוּ
עִם מָשִׁיחַ בֶּן דָוִד -עִם מָשִׁיחַ בֶּן דָוִד

Eliyahu Hanavi, Eliyahu Hatishbi,
Eliyahu Eliyahu EliyahuHagiladi,
Bimherah beyamenu Yavo Elenu
Im Mashiach Ben David.

Elijah the Prophet, Elijahthe Tishbite,
Elijah the Giladite,
Soon may he bring us redemption.

מִרִיַם הַנְבִיאה עז וזִמְרָה בְיָדָה
מִרִיַם תִרְקד אִתָנוּ לְהגדיל זמרת עולם
מִרִיַם תִרְקד אִתָנוּ לְתַקֵן אֶת הֵעולַם
בִמְהֵרַה בְיָמֵנוּ הִיא תְבִיאֵנוּ
אֶל מֵי הַיְשוּעָה, אֶל מֵי הַיְשוּאָה

Miriam haneviyah oz vezimra beyada,
Miriam tirkod itanu lehagdil zimrat olam
Miriam tirkod itanu letakein et haolam
Bimherah beyamenu hee teviyenu
El mey hayeshu'a, el mey hayeshu'a

Miriam the prophet, strength and song in her hand
Miriam, dance with usto increase the song of the world.
Miriam, dance with us to repair the world
Soon may she bring us to the waters of redemption

(Hebrew lyrics by R'Leila Gal Berner)

Hallel
Source : JewishBoston.com

Singing songs that praise God | hallel | הַלֵּל

This is the time set aside for singing. Some of us might sing traditional prayers from the Book of Psalms. Others take this moment for favorites like Chad Gadya & Who Knows One, which you can find in the appendix. To celebrate the theme of freedom, we might sing songs from the civil rights movement. Or perhaps your crazy Uncle Frank has some parody lyrics about Passover to the tunes from a musical. We’re at least three glasses of wine into the night, so just roll with it.

Fourth Glass of Wine

As we come to the end of the seder, we drink one more glass of wine. With this final cup, we give thanks for the experience of celebrating Passover together, for the traditions that help inform our daily lives and guide our actions and aspirations.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the fourth and final glass of wine! 

Nirtzah
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

Nirtzah  marks the conclusion of the seder. Our bellies are full, we have had several glasses of wine, we have told stories and sung songs, and now it is time for the evening to come to a close. At the end of the seder, we honor the tradition of declaring, “Next year in Jerusalem!”

For some people, the recitation of this phrase expresses the anticipation of rebuilding the Temple in Jerusalem and the return of the Messiah. For others, it is an affirmation of hope and of connectedness with  Klal Yisrael, the whole of the Jewish community. Still others yearn for peace in Israel and for all those living in the Diaspora.

Though it comes at the end of the seder, this moment also marks a beginning. We are beginning the next season with a renewed awareness of the freedoms we enjoy and the obstacles we must still confront. We are looking forward to the time that we gather together again. Having retold stories of the Jewish people, recalled historic movements of liberation, and reflected on the struggles people still face for freedom and equality, we are ready to embark on a year that we hope will bring positive change in the world and freedom to people everywhere.

In  The Leader's Guide to the Family Participation Haggadah: A Different Night, Rabbi David Hartman writes: “Passover is the night for reckless dreams; for visions about what a human being can be, what society can be, what people can be, what history may become.”

What can  we  do to fulfill our reckless dreams? What will be our legacy for future generations?

Our seder is over, according to Jewish tradition and law. As we had the pleasure to gather for a seder this year, we hope to once again have the opportunity in the years to come. We pray that God brings health and healing to Israel and all the people of the world, especially those impacted by natural tragedy and war. As we say…

לְשָׁנָה הַבָּאָה בִּירוּשָׁלָֽיִם

L’shana haba-ah biy’rushalayim

NEXT YEAR IN JERUSALEM!

Songs
Source : Time of Israel
Chag Gad Ya Emoji Style

Songs

חַד גַּדְיָא,חַד גַּדְיָא
דְּזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי, חַד גַּדְיָא,חַד גַּדְיָא.

וְאָתָא שׁוּנְרָא וְאַָכְלָה לְגַדְיָא, דְּזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי, חַד גַּדְיָא,חַד גַּדְיָא.

וְאָתָא כַלְבָּא וְנָשַׁךְ לְשׁוּנְרָא, דְּאַָכְלָה לְגַדְיָא, דְּזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי, חַד גַּדְיָא,חַד גַּדְיָא.

וְאָתָא חוּטְרָא והִכָּה לְכַלְבָּא, דְּנָשַׁךְ לְשׁוּנְרָא, דְּאַָכְלָה לְגַדְיָא, דְּזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי, חַד גַּדְיָא,חַד גַּדְיָא.

וְאָתָא נוּרָא וְשָׂרַף לְחוּטְרָא, דְּהִכָּה לְכַלְבָּא, דְּנָשַׁךְ לְשׁוּנְרָא, דְּאַָכְלָה לְגַדְיָא, דְּזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי, חַד גַּדְיָא, חַד גַּדְיָא.

וְאָתָא מַיָא וְכָבָה לְנוּרָא, דְּשָׂרַף לְחוּטְרָא, דְּהִכָּה לְכַלְבָּא, דְּנָשַׁךְ לְשׁוּנְרָא, דְּאַָכְלָה לְגַדְיָא, דְּזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי, חַד גַּדְיָא,חַד גַּדְיָא.

וְאָתָא תוֹרָא וְשָׁתָה לְמַיָא, דְּכָבָה לְנוּרָא, דְּשָׂרַף לְחוּטְרָא, דְּהִכָּה לְכַלְבָּא, דְּנָשַׁךְ לְשׁוּנְרָא, דְּאַָכְלָה לְגַדְיָא, דְּזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי, חַד גַּדְיָא,חַד גַּדְיָא.

וְאָתָא הַשׁוֹחֵט וְשָׁחַט לְתוֹרָא, דְּשָּׁתָה לְמַיָא, דְּכָבָה לְנוּרָא, דְּשָׂרַף לְחוּטְרָא, דְּהִכָּה לְכַלְבָּא, דְּנָשַׁךְ לְשׁוּנְרָא, דְּאַָכְלָה לְגַדְיָא, דְּזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי, חַד גַּדְיָא,חַד גַּדְיָא.

וְאָתָא מַלְאָךְ הַמָּוֶת וְשָׁחַט לְשׁוֹחֵט, דְּשָׁחַט לְתוֹרָא, דְּשָּׁתָה לְמַיָא, דְּכָבָה לְנוּרָא, דְּשָׂרַף לְחוּטְרָא, דְּהִכָּה לְכַלְבָּא, דְּנָשַׁךְ לְשׁוּנְרָא, דְּאַָכְלָה לְגַדְיָא, דְּזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי, חַד גַּדְיָא, חַד גַּדְיָא.

וְאָתָא הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא וְשָׁחַט לְמַלְאַךְ הַמָּוֶת, דְּשָׁחַט לְשׁוֹחֵט, דְּשָׁחַט לְתוֹרָא, דְּשָּׁתָה לְמַיָא, דְּכָבָה לְנוּרָא, דְּשָׂרַף לְחוּטְרָא, דְּהִכָּה לְכַלְבָּא, דְּנָשַׁךְ לְשׁוּנְרָא, דְּאַָכְלָה לְגַדְיָא,
דְּזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי, חַד גַּדְיָא,חַד גַּדְיָא.

Translation:

One little goat, one little goat that my father bought for two zuzim.
A cat came and ate the goat that my father bought for two zuzim. One little goat, one little goat.
A dog came and bit the cat that ate the goat that my father bought for two zuzim. One little goat, one little goat.
A stick came and hit the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat that my father bought for two zuzim. One little goat, one little goat.
A fire came and burned the stick that bit the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat that my father bought for two zuzim. One little goat, one little goat.
Water​ came and put out the fire that burned the stick that bit the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat that my father bought for two zuzim. One little goat, one little goat.
An ox came and drank the water that put out the fire that burned the stick that bit the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat that my father bought for two zuzim. One little goat, one little goat.
A butcher came and slaughter​​​​​​ed the ox that drank the water that put out the fire that burned the stick that bit the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat that my father bought for two zuzim. One little goat, one little goat.
The angel of death came and slaughter​​​​​​ed the butcher who slaughter​​​​​​ed the ox that drank the water that put out the fire that burned the stick that bit the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat that my father bought for two zuzim. One little goat, one little goat.
Then the Holy One, Blessed be He, came and slaughter​​​​​​ed the angel of death who slaughter​​​​​​ed the butcher who slaughter​​​​​​ed the ox that drank the water that put out the fire that burned the stick that bit the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat that my father bought for two zuzim. One little goat, one little goat.

Trans​lation by Eve Levavi.

Transliteration:

Chad gadya, chad gadya.

D’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,chad gadya, chad gadya.

V’ata shunra v’achlah l’gadya,d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,chad gadya, chad gadya.

V’ata chalba v’nashach l’shunrah,d’achlah l’gadya,d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,chad gadya, chad gadya.

V’ata chutra v’hika l’chalba,d’nashach l’shunrah,d’achlah l’gadya,d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,chad gadya, chad gadya.

V’ata nura v’saraf l’chutra,d’hikah l’chalba,d’nashach l’shunrah,d’achlah l’gadya,d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,chad gadya, chad gadya.

V’ata maya v’chava l’nura,d’saraf l’chutra,d’hikah l’chalba,d’nashach l’shunrah,d’achlah l’gadya,d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,chad gadya, chad gadya.

V’ata tora v’shatah l’maya,d’chava l’nura,d’saraf l’chutra,d’hikah l’chalba,d’nashach l’shunrah,d’achlah l’gadya,d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,chad gadya, chad gadya.

V’ata hashocheit v’shachat l’tora,d’shata l’maya,d’chava l’nura,d’saraf l’chutra,d’hikah l’chalba,d’nashach l’shunrah,d’achlah l’gadya,d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,chad gadya, chad gadya.

V’ata malach hamavet v’shachat l’shocheit,d’shachat l’tora,d’shata l’maya,d’chava l’nura,d’saraf l’chutra,d’hikah l’chalba,d’nashach l’shunrah,d’achlah l’gadya,d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,chad gadya, chad gadya.

V’ata Hakodesh Baruch Hu v’shachat l’malach hamavet,d’shachat l’shocheit,d’shachat l’tora,d’shata l’maya,d’chava l’nura,d’saraf l’chutra,d’hikah l’chalba,d’nashach l’shunrah,d’achlah l’gadya,d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,chad gadya, chad gadya.

Songs

אַדִּיר הוּא אַדִּיר הוּא, יִבְנֶה בֵּיתוֹ בְּקָרוֹב. בִּמְהֵרָה, בִּמְהֵרָה, בְּיָמֵינוּ בְּקָרוֹב
אֵל בְּנֵה, אֵל בְּנֵה, בְּנֵה בֵּיתְךָ בְּקָרוֹב 
בָּחוּר הוּא, גָּדוֹל הוּא, דָּגוּל הוּא, יִבְנֶה בֵּיתוֹ בְּקָרוֹב בִּמְהֵרָה,בִּמְהֵרָה, בְּיָמֵינוּ בְּקָרוֹב
אֵל בְּנֵה, אֵל בְּנֵה, בְּנֵה בֵּיתְךָ בְּקָרוֹב
הָדוּר הוּא, וָתִיק הוּא, זַכַּאי הוּא, חָסִיד הוּא, יִבְנֶה בֵּיתוֹ בְּקָרוֹב. בִּמְהֵרָה,בִּמְהֵרָה, בְּיָמֵינוּ בְּקָרוֹב
אֵל בְּנֵה, אֵל בְּנֵה, בְּנֵה בֵּיתְךָ בְּקָרוֹב
טָהוֹר הוּא, יָחִיד הוּא, כַּבִּיר הוּא, לָמוּד הוּא, מֶלֶךְ הוּא, יִבְנֶה בֵּיתוֹ בְּקָרוֹב. בִּמְהֵרָה,בִּמְהֵרָה, בְּיָמֵינוּ בְּקָרוֹב
אֵל בְּנֵה, אֵל בְּנֵה, בְּנֵה בֵּיתְךָ בְּקָרוֹב
נוֹרָא הוּא, סַגִּיב הוּא, עִזּוּז הוּא, פּוֹדֶה הוּא, צַדִיק הוּא, יִבְנֶה בֵּיתוֹ בְּקָרוֹב. בִּמְהֵרָה,בִּמְהֵרָה, בְּיָמֵינוּ בְּקָרוֹב
אֵל בְּנֵה, אֵל בְּנֵה, בְּנֵה בֵּיתְךָ בְּקָרוֹב
קָּדוֹשׁ הוּא, רַחוּם הוּא, שַׁדַּי הוּא, תַּקִּיף הוּא יִבְנֶה בֵּיתוֹ בְּקָרוֹב. בִּמְהֵרָה,בִּמְהֵרָה, בְּיָמֵינוּ בְּקָרוֹב
אֵל בְּנֵה, אֵל בְּנֵה, בְּנֵה בֵּיתְךָ בְּקָרוֹב.

Adir hu, yivei baito b’karov. Bimheirah, bimheirah, b’yamainu b’karov.
El b’nai, El b’nai, b’nai baitcha b’karov.
Bachur hu, gadol hu, dagul hu, yivei baito b’karov. Bimheirah, bimheirah, b’yamainu b’karov.
El b’nai, El b’nai, b’nai baitcha b’karov.
Hadur hu, vatik hu, zakai hu, chasid hu, yivei baito b’karov. Bimheirah, bimheirah, b’yamainu b’karov.
El b’nai, El b’nai, b’nai baitcha b’karov.
Tahor hu, yachid hu, kabir hu, lamud hu, melech hu yivei baito b’karov. Bimheirah, bimheirah, b’yamainu b’karov.
El b’nai, El b’nai, b’nai baitcha b’karov.
Nora hu, sagiv hu, izuz hu, podeh hu, tzadik hu, yivei baito b’karov. Bimheirah, bimheirah, b’yamainu b’karov.
El b’nai, El b’nai, b’nai baitcha b’karov.
Kadosh hu, rachum hu, shadai hu, takif hu yivei baito b’karov. Bimheirah, bimheirah, b’yamainu b’karov.
El b’nai, El b’nai, b’nai baitcha b’karov.

אֶחָד מִי יוֹדֵעַ אֶחָד מִי יוֹדֵעַ? אֶחָד אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ. אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ

שְׁנַיִם מִי יוֹדֵעַ? שְׁנַיִם אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ. שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ

שְׁלשָׁה מִי יוֹדֵעַ? שְׁלשָׁה אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ

אַרְבַּע מִי יוֹדֵעַ? אַרְבַּע אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: אַרְבַּע אִמָהוֹת, שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ

חֲמִשָׁה מִי יוֹדֵעַ? חֲמִשָׁה אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: חֲמִשָׁה חוּמְשֵׁי תוֹרָה, אַרְבַּע אִמָהוֹת, שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ

שִׁשָּׁה מִי יוֹדֵעַ? שִׁשָּׁה אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: שִׁשָּׁה סִדְרֵי מִשְׁנָה, חֲמִשָׁה חוּמְשֵׁי תוֹרָה, אַרְבַּע אִמָהוֹת, שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ

שִׁבְעָה מִי יוֹדֵעַ? שִׁבְעָה אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: שִׁבְעָה יְמֵי שַׁבָּתָא, שִׁשָּׁה סִדְרֵי מִשְׁנָה, חֲמִשָׁה חוּמְשֵׁי תוֹרָה, אַרְבַּע אִמָהוֹת, שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ

שְׁמוֹנָה מִי יוֹדֵעַ? שְׁמוֹנָה אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: שְׁמוֹנָ יְמֵי מִילָה, שִׁבְעָה יְמֵי שַׁבָּתָא, שִׁשָּׁה סִדְרֵי מִשְׁנָה, חֲמִשָׁה חוּמְשֵׁי תוֹרָה, אַרְבַּע אִמָהוֹת, שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ

 תִּשְׁעָה מִי יוֹדֵעַ? תִּשְׁעָה אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: תִּשְׁעָה יַרְחֵי לֵדָה, שְׁמוֹנָה יְמֵי מִילָה, שִׁבְעָה יְמֵי שַׁבָּתָא, שִׁשָּׁה סִדְרֵי מִשְׁנָה, חֲמִשָׁה חוּמְשֵׁי תוֹרָה, אַרְבַּע אִמָהוֹת, שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ

עֲשָׂרָה מִי יוֹדֵעַ? עֲשָׂרָה אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: עֲשָׂרָה דִבְּרַיָא, תִּשְׁעָה יַרְחֵי לֵדָה, שְׁמוֹנָה יְמֵי מִילָה, שִׁבְעָה יְמֵי שַׁבָּתָא, שִׁשָּׁה סִדְרֵי מִשְׁנָה, חֲמִשָׁה חוּמְשֵׁי תוֹרָה, אַרְבַּע אִמָהוֹת, שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ

אַחַד עָשָׂר מִי יוֹדֵעַ? אַחַד עָשָׂר אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: אַחַד עָשָׂר כּוֹכְבַיָּא, עֲשָׂרָה דִבְּרַיָא, תִּשְׁעָה יַרְחֵי לֵדָה, שְׁמוֹנָה יְמֵי מִילָה, שִׁבְעָה יְמֵי שַׁבָּתָא, שִׁשָּׁה סִדְרֵי מִשְׁנָה, חֲמִשָׁה חוּמְשֵׁי תוֹרָה, אַרְבַּע אִמָהוֹת, שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ

 שְׁנֵים עָשָׂר מִי יוֹדֵעַ? שְׁנֵים עָשָׂר אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: שְׁנֵים עָשָׂר שִׁבְטַיָא, אַחַד עָשָׂר כּוֹכְבַיָּא, עֲשָׂרָה דִבְּרַיָא, תִּשְׁעָה יַרְחֵי לֵדָה, שְׁמוֹנָה יְמֵי מִילָה, שִׁבְעָה יְמֵישַׁבָּתָא, שִׁשָּׁה סִדְרֵי מִשְׁנָה, חֲמִשָׁה חוּמְשֵׁי תוֹרָה, אַרְבַּע אִמָהוֹת, שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ

 שְׁלשָׁה עָשָׂר מִי יוֹדֵעַ? שְׁלשָׁה עָשָׂר אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: שְׁלשָׁה עָשָׂר מִדַּיָא, שְׁנֵים עָשָׂר שִׁבְטַיָא, אַחַד עָשָׂר כּוֹכְבַיָּא, עֲשָׂרָה דִבְּרַיָא, תִּשְׁעָה יַרְחֵי לֵדָה, שְׁמוֹנָה יְמֵי מִילָה, שִׁבְעָה יְמֵי שַׁבָּתָא, שִׁשָּׁה סִדְרֵי מִשְׁנָה, חֲמִשָׁה חוּמְשֵׁי תוֹרָה, אַרְבַּע אִמָהוֹת, שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ

Echad mi yode’a? Echad ani yode’a: echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Shnayim mi yode’a? Shnayim ani yode’a: shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Shloshah mi yode’a? Shloshah ani yode’a: shloshah avot, shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Arba mi yode’a? Arba ani yode’a: arba imahot, shloshah avot, shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Chamishah mi yode’a? Chamishah ani yode’a: chamishah chumshei Torah, arba imahot, shloshah avot, shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Shishah mi yode’a? Shishah ani yode’a: shishah sidrei mishnah, chamishah chumshei Torah, arba imahot, shloshah avot, shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Shiv’ah mi yode’a? Shiv’ah ani yode’a: shiv’ah yimei shabbata, shishah sidrei mishnah, chamishah chumshei Torah, arba imahot, shloshah avot, shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Shmonah mi yode’a? Shmonah ani yode’a: shmonah yimei milah, shiv’ah yimei shabbata, shishah sidrei mishnah, chamishah chumshei Torah, arba imahot, shloshah avot, shnailuchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Tishah mi yode’a? Tishah ani yode’a: tishah yarchai laidah, shmonah yimei milah, shiv’ah yimei shabbata, shishah sidrei mishnah, chamishah chumshei Torah, arba imahot, shloshah avot, shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Asarah mi yode’a? Asarah ani yode’a: asarah dibraiya, tishah yarchai laidah, shmonah yimei milah, shiv’ah yimei shabbata, shishah sidrei mishnah, chamishah chumshei Torah, arba imahot, shloshah avot, shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Echad asar mi yode’a? Echad asar ani yode’a: echad asar kochvaya, asarah dibraiya, tishah yarchai laidah, shmonah yimei milah, shiv’ah yimei shabbata, shishah sidrei mishnah, chamishah chumshei Torah, arba imahot, shloshah avot, shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Shnaim asar mi yode’a? Shnaim asar ani yode’a: shnaim asar shivtaiya, echad asar kochvaya, asarah dibraiya, tishah yarchai laidah, shmonah yimei milah, shiv’ah yimei shabbata, shishah sidrei mishnah, chamishah chumshei Torah, arba imahot, shloshah avot, shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Shloshah asar mi yode’a? Shloshah asar ani yode’a: shloshah asar midaiya, shnaim asar shivtaiya, echad asar kochvaya, asarah dibraiya, tishah yarchai laidah, shmonah yimei milah, shiv’ah yimei shabbata, shishah sidrei mishnah, chamishah chumshei Torah, arba imahot, shloshah avot, shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Thirteen are the ways of God
Twelve are the tribes
Eleven are the stars in Joseph's dream
Ten are the commandments
Nine are the months of pregnancy
Eight are the days before Brit Milah
Seven is the day of Shabbat
Six are the books of the Mishnah
Five are the books of Torah
Four are the mothers
Three are the fathers
Two are the tablets
One is our God in the heaven and the earth

Songs
Source : http://www.jr.co.il/humor/pass01.txt

Take Me Out To The Seder (To the tune of , of course, "Take Me Out to the Ballgame!")

Take me out to the Seder Take me out with the crowd.

Feed me on matzah and chicken legs, I don't care for the hard-boiled eggs.

And its root, root, root for Elijah That he will soon reappear.

And let's hope, hope, hope that we'll meet Once again next year!

Take me out to the Seder Take me out with the crowd.

Read the Haggadah And don't skip a word. Please hold your talking, We want to be heard.

And lets, root, root, root for the leader That he will finish his spiel So we can nosh, nosh, nosh and by-gosh Let's eat the meal!!!

Songs

We shall overcome, we shall overcome,
We shall overcome someday.
Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe,
We shall overcome someday.

The truth will make us free, the truth will make us free,
The truth will make us free someday,
Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe,
We shall overcome someday.

We’ll walk hand in hand, we’ll walk hand in hand,
We’ll walk hand in hand someday.
Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe,
We shall overcome someday.

We are not afraid, we are not afraid,
We are not afraid today.
Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe,
We shall overcome someday.

The truth will make us free, the truth will make us free,
The truth will make us free someday,
Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe,
We shall overcome someday.

We shall overcome, we shall overcome,
We shall overcome someday.
Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe,
We shall overcome someday.

Songs

Bang, bang, bang Hold your hammer low
Bang, bang, bang Give a heavy blow
For it's work, work, work Every day and every night,
For it's work, work, work When it's dark and when it's light.
Dig, dig, dig Get your shovel deep
Dig, dig, dig There's no time for sleep
For it's work, work, work Every day and every night
For it's work, work, work When it's dark and when it's light.

Songs
Rube Goldberg https://www.youtube.com/embed/baQfqoZrEvI

Songs

One love! One heart!
Let's get together and feel all right.
Hear the children cryin' (One love!)
Hear the children cryin' (One heart!),
Sayin' give thanks and praise to the Lord and I will feel all right,
Sayin' let's get together and feel all right.

Let them all pass all their dirty remarks (One love!)
There is one question I'd really love to ask (One heart!)
Is there a place for the hopeless sinners,
Who has hurt all mankind just to save his own beliefs?

One love! What about the one heart? One heart!
What about, people? Let's get together and feel all right
As it was in the beginning (One love!)
So shall it be in the end (One heart!),
All right! Give thanks and praise to the Lord and I will feel all right,
Let's get together and feel all right, one more thing!

Let's get together to fight this Holy Armagiddyon (One love!),
So when the Man comes there will be no, no doom (One song!).
Have pity on those whose chances grows t'inner;
There ain't no hiding place from the Father of Creation.

Sayin', One love! What about the one heart? (One heart!)
What about the ? Let's get together and feel all right.
I'm pleadin' to mankind! (One love!)
Oh, Lord! (One heart) Whoa!

Give thanks and praise to the Lord and I will feel all right,
Let's get together and feel all right.
Give thanks and praise to the Lord and I will feel all right,
Let's get together and feel all right.


Read more: Bob Marley - One Love / People Get Ready Lyrics | MetroLyrics 

Songs

There's a land that I see where the children are free
And I say it ain't far to this land from where we are
Take my hand, come with me, where the children are free
Come with me, take my hand, and we'll live

In a land where the river runs free
In a land through the green country
In a land to a shining sea
And you and me are free to be you and me

I see a land bright and clear, and the time's comin' near
When we'll live in this land, you and me, hand in hand
Take my hand, come along, lend your voice to my song
Come along, take my hand, sing a song

For a land where the river runs free
For a land through the green country
For a land to a shining sea
For a land where the horses run free
And you and me are free to be you and me

Every boy in this land grows to be his own man
In this land, every girl grows to be her own woman
Take my hand, come with me where the children are free
Come with me, take my hand, and we'll run

To a land where the river runs free
To a land through the green country
To a land to a shining sea
To a land where the horses run free
To a land where the children are free
And you and me are free to be
And you and me are free to be
And you and me are free to be you and me

Songs

There's No Seder Like our Seder

(By Rabbi Dan Liben,"There's no Business like Show Business")

There's no Seder like our Seder,

There's no Seder I know.

Everything about it is Halachic

Nothing that the Torah won't allow.

Listen how we read the whole Haggadah

‘It's all in Hebrew

'Cause we know how.

There's no Seder like our Seder,

We’ll tell you our tale:

Moses took the people out into the heat

They baked the matzah

While on their feet

Now isn't that a story

That just can't be beat?

Let's go on with the show

Songs

My Favorite Things

 [Sung to the tune of "These are a few of my favorite things"]

Cleaning and cooking and so many dishes

Out with the hametz, no pasta, no knishes

Fish that's gefilted, horseradish that stings

These are a few of our Passover things.

 Matzoh and karpas and chopped up haroset

 Shankbones and Kiddish and Yiddish neuroses

 Tante who kvetches and uncle who sings

 These are a few of our Passover things.

 Motzi and maror and trouble with Pharoahs

 Famines and locusts and slaves with wheelbarrows

 Matzoh balls floating and eggshell that cling

 These are a few of our Passover things.

 When the plagues strike

 When the lice bite

 When we're feeling sad

 We simply remember our Passover things

 And then we don't feel so bad.

 There's No Seder Like our Seder

 (sung to the tune of "There's no Business like Show business")

 There's no seder like our seder,

 There's no seder I know.

 Everything about it is Halachic

 nothing that the Torah won't allow.

 Listen how we read the whole Haggadah

 It's all in Hebrew

 'Cause we know how.

 There's no Seder like our seder,

 We tell a tale that is swell:

 Moses took the people out into the heat

 They baked the matzoh

 While on their feet

 Now isn't that a story

 That just can't be beat?

 Let's go on with the show!

 Take Us Out of Egypt

 (sung to the tune of "Take me out to the ball game")

 Take us out of Egypt

 Free us from slavery

 Bake us some matzoh in a haste

 Don't worry 'bout flavor--

 Give no thought to taste.

 Oh it's rush, rush, rush, to the Red Sea

If we don't cross it's a shame.

 For it's ten plagues,

 Down and you're out

 At the Pesach history game.

Take me out to the Seder

Take me out to the crowd.

Feed me some matzah and kosher wine,

We’ll wine and dine and we’ll have a good time.

For we’ll root for Moshe Rabbeinu

And our crossing through the Red Sea.

For it’s one, two, okay four cups of wine,

We rejoice that we are free!

The Ballad of the Four Sons

 (to the tune of "Clementine")

 Said the father to his children, "At the seder you will dine,

 You will eat your fill of matzoh, you will drink four cups of

 wine."

 Now this father had no daughters, but his sons they numbered four.

 One was wise and one was wicked, one was simple and a bore.

 And the fourth was sweet and winsome, he was young and he was

 small.

 While his brothers asked the questions he could scarcely speak at

 all.

 Said the wise one to his father, "Would you please explain the

 laws?

 Of the customs of the seder, will you please explain the cause?"

 And the father proudly answered, "As our fathers ate in speed,

 Ate the paschal lamb 'ere midnight, and from slavery were freed."

 So we follow their example, and 'ere midnight must complete

 All the seder and we should not, after 12 remain to eat.

 Then did sneer the son so wicked, "What does all this mean to you?"

 And the father's voice was bitter, as his grief and anger grew.

 "If you yourself don't consider, a son of Israel,

 Then for you this has no meaning, you could be a slave as well."

 Then the simple son said simply, "What is this," and quietly

 The good father told his offspring, "We were freed from slavery."

 But the youngest son was silent, for he could not ask at all.

 His bright eyes were bright with wonder as his father told him all.

 My dear children, heed the lesson and remember ever more

 What the father told his children told his sons that numbered four.

Gilligan’s Island

Recline right back and you’ll hear a tale,

A tale of a fateful trip

That started many years ago in old, ancient Egypt.

The Jews were forced to work as slaves,

They suffered that ordeal;

We celebrate their Exodus with a three hour meal,

A three hour meal!

The Pharaoh was an evil dude,

His wrath would not repent

If not for the effort of the fearless Jews,

We’d all be keeping lent,

Yes, we’d all be keeping lent!

They landed in the desert after parting the Red Sea,

With Moses, and Aaron too, each Israelite and his wife,

A movie star, the Professor and Miriam…

Here on Passover night!

Songs

Recline right back and you'll hear a tale, a tale of a fateful trip

that started many years ago in old, ancient Egypt

The Jews were forced to work as slaves, they suffered that ordeal

We celebrate their Exodus with a three hour meal, a three hour meal!

The Pharoah was an evil dude, his wrath would not replent

If not for the effort of the fearless Jews... we'd all be keeping Lent (2x)

They landed in the desert after parting the Red Sea

With Moses, and Aaron too, each Israelite and his wife

A movie star, the Professor, and Miriam... here on Passover night! 

Songs
Source : http://www.jewishrobot.com/2005/04/seda-club.html?m=1

Parody of 50 Cent's "In da Club"

Lyrics



GO, GO, GO, GO, GO, GO

Go ShaBot, its your Pesach
We're gonna' seder like it's your Pesach,
We're sippin' Manischewitz like it's your Pesach
And you know we got the ten plagues for your Pesach!

Chorus
We're at the Seda' Club, give all your bread a shove,
cuz we got a lot o' matzah that we got to get rid of
I gotta drink a lotta' wine, the kind I really love,
So come an' drink it up, if you got a kiddish cup

Let's hear the ten plagues, yo!

DAM
Blood in the river, back off n*gga'
Don't you f*ck with 50 Cent I'll pull the trigga'

TZ'FARDEA
The freaky leaky frogs hoppin out of bogs, they
better back off quick or I'll release the f*ckin' dogs

KINIM
That's lice, ain't nice, ain't nice,
That's right I said it twice and now you gonna' pay the price

AROV
A beast, at our feast, we ain't got yeast
Gonna chill wit 50 Cent to say the very least

DEVER
Pestilence, call an ambulance,
You better make it quick cuz I don wanna take a chance

SH'CHIN
Damn, bitch, you got a lotta boils, better get the baby oils
and we get busy like the freaky moyhels

BARAD
Hail, never fail, gonna get some tail,
Gonna check the mail an drink a 40 ounce of ale

ARBEH
The locust, they focused, they wanna choke us,
They gonna' roll us up and light our ass to smoke us

CHOSHECH
Man its dark, motherf*ckin narc I'm in the park
got my philly blunt and lightin' up the spark

MAKAS B'CHOROS
Look out first-born, gonna' get the horn
Slay you, cap yo ass juss like I'm poppin' corn

(Chorus)

Songs

‘Twas the Night Before Pesach

By Marc Levy

‘Twas the night before Pesach, and all through the house

not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse.

The mice were too hungry to squeak or to scurry;

the chametz had all been cleaned up in a hurry.

The table was laid with the silver and china,

the linen was spotless, the crystal was shine-a.

Charoset and horseradish, set in their dish,

And fifty-six balls of gefilte-fized fish.

The wine had been poured in the glasses with care,

in hopes that tomorrow Elijah'd be there.

The whole house was immaculate, clean as you please,

As we lay digesting our dinner - Chinese.

The children were nestled all snug in their beds,

While visions of matzoh balls danced in their heads.

And Mom in her shmata and I in my cap

had just settled down for a long Pesach nap,

But one minute later, sleep came to a halt

when my wife woke me screaming "Oy vey! Oy gevalt!"

For out on the lawn there arose a great clatter;

I sprang from my bed to see what was the matter.

I looked out the window and saw quite a scene.

Blinking my eyes, I said, “Is this a dream?”

For there in the driveway, bathed in moonlight,

Was a miniature Moses, and eight tiny Israelites.

Right up to my door this strange caravan came.

They were schlepping a sleigh, and Moish called them by name:

“Hey Shloimy!” he shouted, “Hey Sammy and Sadie!

Let’s hustle!” he ordered, “we’re running quite latey!”

As I drew in my head, and was turning around,

Moses let himself into my house, with a bound.

He was dressed rather poorly, and covered with schmutz,

With Israeli sandals on both of his foots.

This Moses looked tired, like he’d traveled quite far.

He was huffing and puffing; he smoked a cigar.

But he seemed rather merry, and did a small waltz,

And he shook, when he laughed, like a bowl full of schmaltz.

It was clear what he wanted; on his goal he was homing:

He went straight to the table, and stole the afikomen!

Then turning around at a fairly brisk clip,

he grabbed Elijah’s wineglass, and drank down a sip.

Then he sprang to his sleigh, shouted, “Let’s move it, Harry!

We’ve got to keep moving, we’ve no time to tarry”!

But I heard him exclaim, ere he drove out of sight,

“Ziesen Pesach to all, and to all a good night”!

© Marc Levy 2002