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Introduction
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

Introduction

The seder officially begins with a physical act: lighting the candles.  In Jewish tradition, lighting candles and saying a blessing over them marks a time of transition, from the day that is ending to the one that is beginning, from ordinary time to sacred time.  Lighting the candles is an important part of our Passover celebration because their flickering light reminds us of the importance of keeping the fragile flame of freedom alive in the world.

Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu melech ha'olam asher kid'shanu b'mitzvotav, v'tzivanu l'hadlik ner shel Yom Tov.

Blessed are You, Adonai our God, Ruler of the Universe, who has sanctified us with laws and commanded us to light the festival lights.

As we light the festival candles, we acknowledge that as they brighten our Passover table, good thoughts, good words, and good deeds brighten our days.

Introduction
Source : Original Illustration from Haggadot.com

Introduction

To everything there is a season and a time. Today is a time for many feelings. Today we weep as we recount the suffering of our ancestors and we laugh at their deliverance. We mourn the innocent victims of cruelty and persecution, but our hears dance with price in their valiant struggle for liberty. Today we tell again the story of the Exodus from Egypt, but we are silent with wonder at the events. Today is a time to look backward, so that we can look forward. Today we tell the story of freedom.

Introduction

Be Our Guest! Be Our Guest!

Put our seder to the test!

All you have to do is come on in

And we’ll provide the rest.

Here’s some wine in a cup!

Just recline and drink it up!

It will be your favorite flavor

If it’s Concord grape you favor!

Life is sweet!  Life is good!

When you’re in our neighborhood!

And when you are here

Elijah we are blessed!

Just park your golden chariot

You don’t need a Marriott!

Be our Guest!  Be our Guest! Be our Guest!

Introduction

The Seder Plate

We place a Seder Plate at our table as a reminder to discuss certain aspects of the Passover story. Each item has its own significance.

Maror – The bitter herb. This symbolizes the harshness of lives of the Jews in Egypt.

Charoset – A delicious mix of sweet wine, apples, cinnamon and nuts that resembles the mortar used as bricks of the many buildings the Jewish slaves built in Egypt

Karpas – A green vegetable, usually parsley, is a reminder of the green sprouting up all around us during spring and is used to dip into the saltwater

Zeroah – A roasted lamb or shank bone symbolizing the sacrifice made at the great temple on Passover (The Paschal Lamb)

Beitzah – The egg symbolizes a different holiday offering that was brought to the temple. Since eggs are the first item offered to a mourner after a funeral, some say it also evokes a sense of mourning for the destruction of the temple.

Orange - The orange on the seder plate has come to symbolize full inclusion in modern day Judaism: not only for women, but also for people with disabilities, intermarried couples, and the LGBT Community.

Matzah

Matzah is the unleavened bread we eat to remember that when the jews fled Egypt, they didn’t even have time to let the dough rise on their bread. We commemorate this by removing all bread and bread products from our home during Passover.

Elijah’s Cup

The fifth ceremonial cup of wine poured during the Seder. It is left untouched in honor of Elijah, who, according to tradition, will arrive one day as an unknown guest to herald the advent of the Messiah. During the Seder dinner, biblical verses are read while the door is briefly opened to welcome Elijah. In this way the Seder dinner not only commemorates the historical redemption from Egyptian bondage of the Jewish people but also calls to mind their future redemption when Elijah and the Messiah shall appear.

Miriam’s Cup

Another relatively new Passover tradition is that of Miriam’s cup. The cup is filled with water and placed next to Elijah’s cup. Miriam was the sister of Moses and a prophetess in her own right. After the exodus when the Israelites are wandering through the desert, just as Hashem gave them Manna to eat, legend says that a well of water followed Miriam and it was called ‘Miriam’s Well’. The tradition of Miriam’s cup is meant to honor Miriam’s role in the story of the Jewish people and the spirit of all women, who nurture their families just as Miriam helped sustain the Israelites.

Introduction
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

Introduction
Source : RAC

Come, let us gather as one, bound together by love and the shared hope that all Jews, and all people, will one day live free and in peace. Together, let us recall the story of Passover, relived time and again by Jews throughout the world. As we move through the Seder, reaffirming our belief in a faith so rich in history and life, may we take into our hearts the memory of all who have and continue to enrich our lives and remember those who still suffer the pain of war, oppression, tyranny, and prejudice.

- The Chaikin Family

Introduction

Parents recite the following blessing over their children at the start of the Passover meal:

יְבָרֶכְךָ אֲדוֹנָי וְיִשְׁמְרֶךָ
יָאֵר אֲדוֹנָי פָּנָיו אֵלֶיךָ וִיחֻנֶּךָּ
יִשָּׂא אֲדוֹנָי פָּנָיו אֵלֶיךָ וְיָשֵׂם לְךָ שָׁלוֹם

Yevarechecha Adonai ve-yishmereicha
Ya-er Adonai panav eilecha ve-ichunecha
Yissa Adonai panav eilecha ve-yasem lecha shalom

child-blessing-pic.jpg?itok=v48dVdto

May God bless you and watch over you.
May God's face shin upon you and be gracious to you.
May God's face be lifted up to you and grant you peace.

Introduction

"Prayer is meaningless unless it is subversive, unless it seeks to overthrow and to ruin the pyramids of callousness, hatred, opportunism, falsehoods. The liturgical movement must become a revolutionary movement, seeking to overthrow the forces that continue to destroy the promise, the hope, the vision."

—Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel, 1970

Introduction
Source : Love and Justice In Times of War Haggadah
Baruch atah Adonai, eloheinu Melekh ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tsivanu lirdof tzedek

Brucha Yah Shechinah, eloheinu Malkat ha-olam, asher kid’shatnu b’mitzvotayha vitzivatnu lirdof tzedek

Blessed is the Source, who shows us paths to holiness, and commands us to pursue justice. 

Introduction
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

Introduction
Source : Abraham Joshua Heschel Quote, Design by Haggadot.com

Introduction
Source : http://www.truah.org/documents/Prayer-for-Human-Rights-Day_0.pdf

A Prayer for Human Rights 

Rabbi Brant Rosen


Ruach Kol Chai - Spirit of All that Lives: Help us.

Help us to uphold the values that are so central to whom we are: human beings created B'tzelem Elohim- in the image of God. Help us to recognize that the inherent dignity of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world. The inherent dignity and the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family are the foundations of freedom, justice and peace in the world. May we find the strength to protect and plead the cause of the stranger among us, to ensure just treatment for all who dwell in our land.

Guide us.

Guide us toward one law. One justice. One human standard of behavior toward all. Move us away from the equivocation that honors the divine image in some but not in others. Let us forever affirm that the justice we purport to hold dear is nothing but a sham if it does not uphold the value of K'vod Habriot - basic human dignity for all who dwell in our midst.

Forgive us.

Forgive us for the inhumane manner in which we too often treat the other. We know, or should, that when it comes to crimes against humanity, some of us may be guilty, but all of us are responsible. Grant us kapparah - atonement for the misdeeds of exclusion we invariably commit against the most vulnerable members of society: the unwanted, the unhoused, the uninsured, the undocumented.

Strengthen us.

Strengthen us to find the wherewithal to shine your light into the dark places of our world. Give us ability to uncover those who are hidden from view, locked away, forgotten. Let us never forget that nothing is hidden and no one lost from before you. Embolden us in the knowledge that neshamot - human souls are neither disposable nor replaceable; that we can never, try as we might, lock away the humanity of another.

Remind us.

Remind us of our duty to create a just society right here, right now, in our day. Give us the vision of purpose to guard against the complacency of the comfortable - and the resolve in knowing that we cannot put off the cause of justice and freedom for another day. Remind us that the time is now. Now is the moment to create your kingdom here on earth.

Ken Yehi Ratzon. May it be your will. And may it be ours. And let us say, Amen.

Introduction

All:  We have to keep in mind at all times that we are not fighting for integration, nor are we fighting for separation.  We are fighting for recognition as human beings.  We are fighting for the right to live as free human beings in this society.  In fact we are fighting for rights that are even greater than civil rights and that is human rights.  

Malcolm speaks

Introduction

We have come together this evening for many reasons. We are here because Spring is all around, the earth is reborn, and it is a good time to celebrate with family and friends. We are here because we are Jews and friends of Jews. We are here to honor the Jewish nation's deep historic roots and it's old important memories.

We are here to remember the old story of liberation of the ancient Hebrews from slavery in Egypt- a great struggle for freedom and dignity. We are here because the struggle for human freedom never stops. We are here to remember all people- Jews and non-Jews- who continue to struggle for their freedom.

Introduction
Source : http://holidays.juda.com/passover-songs.shtml

There's no seder like our seder,

There's no seder I know.

Everything about it is halachic

Nothing that the Torah won't allow.

Listen how we read the whole Haggadah

It's all in Hebrew 'Cause we know how.

There's no Seder like our seder,

We tell a tale that is swell:

Moses took the people out into the heat

They baked the matzah

While on their feet

Now isn't that a story That just can't be beat?

Let's go on with the show!

Introduction

Freedom gives us the power to choose how to live our lives,

which foods to eat,

which clothes to wear, 

which schools to attend, 

which friends to make.

Thousands of years ago, the Jewish people didn't know that joyous feeling we call freedom.  They were slaves in Egypt crying out to be free.

Imagine a narrow prison cell, so tiny that our stretched out arms touch the sides, and we have to sit huddled up, knees bent, in a tight ball.  That's how slavery feels.

The seder is the story of the Israelites' journey from slavery to freedom.  Everything we do on Passover reminds us of that awesome journey that began in the darkness of Egypt in the middle of the night and ended in a land that people had never seen, the land God had promised them, the land of Israel.

On Passover, we look forward to walking again on that road to freedom as if we ourselves were there.

Introduction

THE ABCs OF PASSOVER

LAUREN KRUEGER AND MATTHEW DAVID BROZIK

          A is for April, when Passover’s here!
          (Unless it’s in some other month of the year.)

B is for Boils, Beasts, Blackout, and Blood.
Dinner conversation never had it so good!

C is for Challah — egg bread: you can’t beat it!
And during this holiday, nor can you eat it.

D is for Drinking: four full cups of wine.
Required — a mitzvah! (Or grape juice, it’s fine.)

E is for Egypt, land the Jews fled.
Then shook the Egyptians in the Sea that is Red.

F is for Fish, “gefilte” it’s called,
Carp and pike, both thoroughly mauled.

 is for Gathering, that’s what we do!
The more, the moanier, when you’re a Jew.

H is for Hebrew, language Semitic.
“I’m saying it wrong? Everybody’s a critic!”

I is for Israel, the land we hold dear.
But no rush to go; there’s always next year!

J is for Jewish — that is, not a goy.
You know, like that nice Star-of-Bethlehem boy.

 is for Kosher, fit for consumption.
Or, put another way: “okay to eat,” according to basic laws derived from two of the five books of the Torah — Leviticus and Deuteronomy; but the details and practical applications of those laws were transmitted over centuries through oral law (eventually codified in the Mishnah and Talmud) and later elaborated upon in rabbinical literature… and the rationale for most of which is nowhere to be found.

L is for Lamb, star meat of the meal.
So tender! So juicy! Oh, wait… no — that’s veal.

M is for Matzo, a crispy delight.
(Yet fifty-one weeks of the year: out of sight.)

N is for Neighbors, like-minded feasters.
Unless they’re the kind who celebrate Easters.

O’s for Oppression, cruel subjugation.
Was that any way to treat God’s Chosen Nation?

P is for Pharaohs, harsh ancient rulers,
Who nearly deprived mankind of wholesale jewelers.

Q is for Questions, of which there are four:
“Why us?” 
“Is it over?” 
“When’s dinner?” 
“There’s more?!”

R’s for the holiday highlight: the reading.
I’m kidding! We’re Jews. It’s all about eating.

S is for Seder, from Hebrew for “order.”
Each one takes as long as the journey to Mordor.

T’s for Tradition. (I’m sure that you knew it!)
“Because your great-grandmother did it,” you do it.

U’s for Unleavened, describing the food,
But also, in consequence, everyone’s mood.

V is for Visitors. Pull up a chair!
Thinking of slipping out early? Don’t you dare.

WWisdom, the words of the sages.
But seriously, guys. How many more pages?

X as in Exodus, book of the Torah.
But turn back for saucy reports from Gomorrah.

Y is for Yeast, fungus forbidden!
How fast can you find where the Wonder Bread’s hidden?

Z is for Zzzzz, but no one is snoring.
The story’s not new, but it’s never boring.

So there it is: Passover, letter by letter.
(And not even Moses himself could do better.)

- - -

Kadesh
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

Kadesh

Please join me in the blessing over the wine:

Blessed art thou who has created the fruit of the vine.

Barech atah adonai, elohanu melach haolam, borei pree hagafen.

Let us drink our in a toast to Freedom!

To Freedom!!!

Kadesh
Source : Hamilton

99250343dc2b24acbe96eff4d62f0e7f.1000x563x1.jpg?itok=66fND9BhRaise a glass to freedom  /  Something they can never take away  /  No matter what they tell you

Kadesh
Source : Yehudah Webster & Leo Ferguson, http://jfrej.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/JFREJ_BLM_Haggadah_Extended.pdf

When drinking the four cups and eating the matzah, we lean on our left side to accentuate the fact that we are free people. In ancient times only free people had the luxury of reclining while eating. We ask that this year you consider what it means to recline when so many are not yet free from oppression. This is not a simple question, and so there is no simple answer. In solidarity, you may choose not to recline. Or perhaps we can rest tonight in order to let go of the weight of our fears — our fear of others; of being visible as Jews; of committing to work outside of what is familiar and comfortable — so that we may lean into struggle tomorrow. 

Kadesh

Hiney ma tov u’ma nayim shevet achim gam yachad

Hiney ma tov u’ma nayim shevet achim gam yachad

Hiney ma tov u’ma nayim shevet achim gam yachad

How good and pleasant it is sisters, brothers, all of us, to be together.

Kadesh
Source : http://holidays.juda.com/passover-songs.shtml

Take Us out of Egypt (sung to the tune of Take me out to the ball game")

Take us out of Egpyt

Free us from slavery

Bake us some matzah in a haste

Don't worry 'bout flavor--Give no thought to taste.

Oh it's rush, rush, rush, to the Red Sea

If we don't cross it's a shame

For it's ten plagues, Down and you're out

At the Pessah history game.

Kadesh
Source : Original Illustration from Haggadot.com

Urchatz
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

Urchatz
Source : Velveteen Rabbi's Haggadah, the Religious Action Center's Earth Justice Haggadah, and the SCJC

This symbolic washing of the hands recalls the story of Miriam's Well. Legend tells us that this well followed Miriam, sister of Moses, through the desert, sustaining the Jews in their wanderings. Filled with mayim chayim, waters of life, the well was a source of strength and renewal to all who drew from it. One drink from its waters was said to alert the heart, mind and soul, and make the meaning of Torah become alive.

In Hebrew, urchatz means “washing” or “cleansing.” In Aramaic, sister language to Hebrew, urchatz means “trusting.” As we wash each others’ hands, let us rejoice in this act of trust, while remembering the lack of trust between those in Flint, California and Cochabamba and those who supply and control their access to mayim chayim - living waters.

Pass the bowl & pitcher around the table, pouring a few drops of water onto your neighbor’s hands. Alternately, symbolize the uplifting of cleansed hands by raising hands into the air. 

Optional chant for handwashing: 

פֶלֶג אֱלֹהִים מָלֵא מַיִם / מַיִם חַיִּים 

Peleg elohim, malei mayyim /Mayyim chayyim

Fountain of God, full of water /waters of life!

—Rabbi Shefa Gold

Karpas
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

Karpas
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

Karpas
Source : Rabbi Geela Rayzel Raphael, Five Interfaith Passover Readings You Can Add to Your Haggadah
Karpas (parsley that is dipped in salt water during the seder) kavannah (spiritual focus)--time for spring awakening, new directions--renewal and bursting forth of new ideas.

We take this time to honor others who travel with us from other faiths and cultural traditions. We acknowledge the fact that they bring a new perspective to our lives and a legacy of their own that enriches ours. We are grateful for the growth that we have experienced because they are in our lives.

As a plant bursts forth with new energy to bloom, so too we recognize that at this time of Jewish history we are blossoming in different ways. As the garden needs tending, so, too, do our relationships with spouses, in-laws and families of other traditions. Weeding out all that is not necessary and loving, we make room for fresh insight and respect. Welcome those who sit around this table for the first time or the twentieth, bringing new understanding to our discussion.

Karpas

Passover, like many of our holidays, combines the celebration of an event from our Jewish memory with a recognition of the cycles of nature. As we remember the liberation from Egypt, we also recognize the stirrings of spring and rebirth happening in the world around us. The symbols on our table bring together elements of both kinds of celebration.

We now take a vegetable, representing our joy at the dawning of spring after our long, cold winter. Most families use a green vegetable, such as parsley or celery, but some families from Eastern Europe have a tradition of using a boiled potato since greens were hard to come by at Passover time. Whatever symbol of spring and sustenance we’re using, we now dip it into salt water, a symbol of the tears our ancestors shed as slaves. Before we eat it, we recite a short blessing:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הָאֲדָמָה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree ha-adama.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruits of the earth.

We look forward to spring and the reawakening of flowers and greenery. They haven’t been lost, just buried beneath the snow, getting ready for reappearance just when we most needed them.

Karpas
Source : Original Illustration from Haggadot.com

Yachatz
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

Yachatz

While holding up the three pieces matzo:

This is the bread of affliction which our ancestors ate in Egypt.  Let all who are hungry come in and eat, let all who are need come and share this food.

The middle piece is broken and wrapped:

This is the Afikomen which is the Greek word for dessert.  Because the taste of matzo should remain with us at the end of the meal, I am hiding it and whomever finds it will return it for a prize.

Yachatz
Source : Original Illustration from Haggadot.com

Yachatz

Give me the liberty to know, to utter and to argue freely according to conscience and above all liberation.

Maggid - Beginning
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

Maggid - Beginning
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

Pour the second glass of wine for everyone.

The Haggadah doesn’t tell the story of Passover in a linear fashion. We don’t hear of Moses being found by the daughter of Pharaoh – actually, we don’t hear much of Moses at all. Instead, we get an impressionistic collection of songs, images, and stories of both the Exodus from Egypt and from Passover celebrations through the centuries. Some say that minimizing the role of Moses keeps us focused on the miracles God performed for us. Others insist that we keep the focus on the role that every member of the community has in bringing about positive change.

Maggid - Beginning

All:  The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppress.  Frederick Douglas

Maggid - Beginning

The Israelites in Egypt by Max and Isaac Messinger 5774.

-- Four Questions
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

-- Four Questions

The four questions are asked every year, and we are meant to pretend not to know the answers. The point of these questions is to inspire you to ask more questions. Tonight you should question everything. The youngest person at the table is meant to read them, but usually we all sing them together.

מַה נִּשְּׁתַּנָה הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה מִכָּל הַלֵּילוֹת
שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָנוּ אוֹכְלִין חָמֵץ וּמַצָּה,

-הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה כּוּלוֹ מַצָּה.
שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָנוּ אוֹכְלִין שְׁאָר יְרָקוֹת,

- הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה מָרוֹר.
שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אֵין אֶנוּ מַטְבִּילִין אֲפִילוּ פַּעַם אֶחָת,

- הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה שְׁתֵּי פְעָמִים.
שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָנוּ אוֹכְלִין בֵּין יוֹשְׁבִין וּבֵין מְסֻבִּין,

- הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה כֻּלָנו מְסֻבִּין

Ma nishtanah halailah hazeh mikol haleilot?

Sheb’khol haleilot anu okhlin hametz umatzoh; halailah hazeh, kuloh matzoh.

Sheb’khol haleilot anu okhlin sh’ar y’rakot; halailah hazeh, maror.

Sheb’khol haleilot ein anu matbilin afilu pa’am ehat; halailah hazeh, shtei f’amim.

Sheb’khol haleilot anu okhlin bein yoshvin uvein m’subin; halailah hazeh, kulanu m’subin.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Why is this night different from all other nights?

On all other nights we eat leavened products and matzoh. Why on this night do we eat only matzoh?

On all other nights we eat all vegetables. Why on this night do we eat only bitter herbs?

On all other nights, we don’t dip our food even once. Why on this night do we dip twice?

On all other nights we eat sitting or reclining. Why on this night do we only recline?

-- Four Questions
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

-- Four Questions

On all other nights we may eat bread or matzah, but on this night we eat only matzah?  

     When our ancestors left Egypt they didn't have time to let yeast make the dough rise so they baked bread without  yeast. We eat only matzah this night to remember their haste to escape bondage.

On all other nights we eat all kinds of herbs, but on this night we eat only bitter herbs?

     We eat bitter herbs to remind us that bondage is a source of bitterness that makes life harsh as it was with our forefathers.

On all other nights we do not dip even once, but on this night we dip twice?

     First we dip into the tears of sorrow from bondage with the greens of life to remind us of the hopes and joys of freedom. Then we dip into the bitter memory of service in bondage with the fruit of new life to remind us of the hope of rewarding service with purpose in the presence of God.

On all other nights we eat sitting or reclining, but on this night we recline?

     Our ancestors could not recline at the original Passover in Egypt but, through the grace and power of a loving God, they were then redeemed and delivered from bondage. We recline at ease to remind ourselves to relax and remember that freedom is established through loving kindness and the hand of God.

-- Four Questions
by E C
Source : Shared by Kohenet Ilana Joy Streit at http://www.ritualwell.org/ritual/ma-nishtana-what-needs-change

What needs to change so the world as it is can wake up? 

What needs to change so the world as it is can love us?

What needs to change right now so we can breathe? 

What needs to change so our sisters and brothers can be as free as we are? 

And what needs to change so that we can be free too? 

What needs to change in our voices, our postures, our pacing? 

What needs to change in howwe try to change our bodies? 

What needs to change in our newspapers and in our budgets? 

What needs to change in our language and in our bedrooms? 

What needs to change in how we look in the mirror? 

...

What needs to change so that I have a voice and you have ears? 

I know what needs to change and you know what needs to change and we will be the change.

-- Four Questions
Source : Hillel Quote, Design from Haggadot.com

-- Four Questions

All:  In the meantime I must uphold my ideals for perhaps the time will come when I shall be able to carry them out.  Anne Frank

-- Four Questions

Everything that is really great and inspiring is created by the individual who can labor in freedom.

-- Four Questions
Source : Temple Israel of Boston

To be read following the chanting of the Four Questions.

1. The Torah demands, “Justice, justice shall you pursue!” (Deut 16:20). What are the obstacles to fulfilling this commandment in the context of criminal justice?

2. The Sage Hillel taught: “That which is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow” (BT Shabbat 31a). At the heart of our Passover story is the remembrance of being slaves in Egypt. How do we internalize this narrative of “imprisonment” and express it in our own public lives?

3. In Genesis we read that God created human beings, “b’tzelem Elohim, in God’s image.” How does institutionalized racism undermine this teaching? Do you feel obliged to assign this teaching to all human beings, including those who have committed heinous crimes?

4. The Talmud teaches, “The person who destroys one life, it is as though that person has destroyed the whole world; and the person who saves one life, it is as though that person has saved the whole world” (JT Sanhedrin 4:1). It is naive to overlook the societal necessity of a working criminal justice system. Imagine a criminal justice system that fulfills the supreme Jewish value of saving lives: What does it “look like”?

-- Four Questions
Source : Moishe House Munich

English

What makes this night different from all [other] nights?

1) On all nights we need not dip even once, on this night we do so twice?

2) On all nights we eat chametz or matzah, and on this night only matzah?

3) On all nights we eat any kind of vegetables, and on this night maror?

4) On all nights we eat sitting upright or reclining, and on this night we all recline?

Hebrew

Mah nishtanah halyla hazeh mikol halaylot

1) She'bechol halaylot ain anu matbilin afilu pa'am echat, halyla hazeh shtei pe'amim?

2) She'bechol halaylot anu ochlim chametz o matza, halyla hazeh kulo maztah?

3) She'bechol halaylot anu ochlim she'ar yerakot, halyla hazeh maror?

4) She'bechol halaylot anu ochlim bain yoshvin bain mesubin, halyla hazeh kulanu mesubin?

Spanish

¿Qué hace diferente a esta noche de todas las [demás] noches?

1) En todas las noches no precisamos sumergir ni siquiera una vez, ¡y en esta noche lo hacemos dos veces?

2) En todas las noches comemos jametz o matzá, ¡en esta noche solamente matzá?

3) En todas las noches comemos cualquier clase de verdura, ¡esta noche maror?

4) En todas las noches comemos sentados erguidos o reclinados, ¡esta noche todos nos reclinamos!

German

Was unterscheidet diese Nacht von allen anderen Nächten?

In allen anderen Nächten brauchen wir nicht ein einziges Mal einzutunken, in dieser Nacht zweimal?

In allen anderen Nächten können wir Gesäuertes und Ungesäuertes essen, in dieser Nacht nur Ungesäuertes?

In allen anderen Nächten können wir verschiedene Kräuter essen, in dieser Nacht nur bittere Kräuter?

In allen anderen Nächten essen wir sitzend oder angelehnt, in dieser Nacht sitzen wir alle angelehnt?

Russian

Уем отличается эта ночь от других ночей?
Во все другие ночи мы едим либо хомец, либо мацу в эту ночьтоль ко мацу;
Во все другие ночи мы едим разную зелень, а в эту ночь-лтшь горькую;
Во все другие ночи мы ни разу не обмакиваем /пищу/, а в эту ночь-дважды;
Во все другие ночи мы едим сидяили возлегая, а в эту ночь-возлегая.

-- Four Questions
Source : Moishe House Munich

English

What makes this night different from all [other] nights?

1) On all nights we need not dip even once, on this night we do so twice?

2) On all nights we eat chametz or matzah, and on this night only matzah?

3) On all nights we eat any kind of vegetables, and on this night maror?

4) On all nights we eat sitting upright or reclining, and on this night we all recline?

Hebrew

Mah nishtanah halyla hazeh mikol halaylot

1) She'bechol halaylot ain anu matbilin afilu pa'am echat, halyla hazeh shtei pe'amim?

2) She'bechol halaylot anu ochlim chametz o matza, halyla hazeh kulo maztah?

3) She'bechol halaylot anu ochlim she'ar yerakot, halyla hazeh maror?

4) She'bechol halaylot anu ochlim bain yoshvin bain mesubin, halyla hazeh kulanu mesubin?

Spanish

¿Qué hace diferente a esta noche de todas las [demás] noches?

1) En todas las noches no precisamos sumergir ni siquiera una vez, ¡y en esta noche lo hacemos dos veces?

2) En todas las noches comemos jametz o matzá, ¡en esta noche solamente matzá?

3) En todas las noches comemos cualquier clase de verdura, ¡esta noche maror?

4) En todas las noches comemos sentados erguidos o reclinados, ¡esta noche todos nos reclinamos!

German

Was unterscheidet diese Nacht von allen anderen Nächten?

In allen anderen Nächten brauchen wir nicht ein einziges Mal einzutunken, in dieser Nacht zweimal?

In allen anderen Nächten können wir Gesäuertes und Ungesäuertes essen, in dieser Nacht nur Ungesäuertes?

In allen anderen Nächten können wir verschiedene Kräuter essen, in dieser Nacht nur bittere Kräuter?

In allen anderen Nächten essen wir sitzend oder angelehnt, in dieser Nacht sitzen wir alle angelehnt?

Russian

Уем отличается эта ночь от других ночей?
Во все другие ночи мы едим либо хомец, либо мацу в эту ночьтоль ко мацу;
Во все другие ночи мы едим разную зелень, а в эту ночь-лтшь горькую;
Во все другие ночи мы ни разу не обмакиваем /пищу/, а в эту ночь-дважды;
Во все другие ночи мы едим сидяили возлегая, а в эту ночь-возлегая.

-- Four Questions

We are closer to God when we are asking questions than when we think we have the answers.

-- Four Questions

Spouse or Child:

“Why is this night different from all other nights?

Why on all nights, do we need not dip even once, but on this night we do so twice!

Why on all nights do we eat chametz or matzah, but on this night only matzah.

Why on all nights do we eat any kind of vegetables, but on this night maror!

Why on all nights do we eat sitting upright or reclining, but on this night we all recline!”

Host:

“We eat only matzah because our ancestors could not wait for their breads to rise when they were fleeing slavery in Egypt, and so they were flat when they came out of the oven.

We eat only maror, a bitter herb, to remind us of the bitterness of slavery that our ancestors endured while in Egypt.

The first dip, vegetables in salt water, symbolizes the replacing of our tears with gratitude, and the second dip, maror in charoset, symbolizes the sweetening of our burden of bitterness and suffering.

We recline at the seder table because in ancient times, a person that reclined at a meal was a free person, while slaves and servants stood."

-- Four Questions

Mah Nishtana halayla hazeh mikol haleylot? Mikol haleylot?
Sheb-ch-ol haleylot anu o-ch-lim ch-ametz umatzah,
Ch-ametz umatzah.
Halaylah hazeh, halaylah hazeh kulo matzah.
Halaylah hazeh, halaylah hazeh kulo matzah.

Sheb-ch-ol haleylot anu o-ch-lim she-ar yerakot.
She-ar yerakot.
Halayla hazeh, halayla hazeh maror.
Halayla hazeh, halayla hazeh maror

Sheb-ch-ol haleylot eyn anu matbilin afilu pa-am e-ch-at.
Afilu pa-am e-ch-at.
Halayla hazeh, halayla hazeh sh'tae p'amim.
Halayla hazeh, halayla hazeh sh'tae p'amim.

Sheb-ch-ol haleylot anu o-ch-lim beyn yoshvin uveyn mesubin.
Beyn yoshvin uveyn mesubin.
Halayla hazeh, halayla hazeh kulanu mesubin.
Halayla hazeh, halayla hazeh kulanu mesubin


Translation: The Four Questions

That on other nights we eat leavened bread or matzah, on this night we eat matzah

That on other nights we eat other greens, on this night we eat bitter herbs.

That on other nights we do not dip even once, on this night we dip twice.

That on other nights we eat sitting or reclining, on this night we all recline.

-- Four Questions
-- Four Children
In recounting our story, let us consider that we tell it to four children, one wise, one simple, one wicked and one innocent.

The wise child asks: How can I learn more about our people?  To that child you shall direct our wealth of literature so that they may seek out this knowledge for themself.

The simple child asks: What is this all about?  To that child you shall say simply , because we had faith we were redeemed from slavery.

The wicked child asks: What good is this to you?  To that child you shall say, do not exclude yourself by saying "to you" but say instead "to us", for only together can we succeed.

The innocent child does not know how to ask.  For this child you shall tell them that we were taken out of Egypt so that we could be free.

Say to all of the children, that you may know who you are, get wisdom, get understanding and it shall preserve you, love it and it shall keep you.

-- Four Children
I would like to ask that we begin to dream about and plan for a different world.  A fairer world.  A world of happier men and happier women who are truer to themselves.  And this is how to start: we must raise our daughters differently.  We must also raise our sons differently.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

-- Four Children

Life is like a mountain railroad

With an engineer that's brave

We must make the run successful

From the cradle to the grave.

-- Four Children
Source : http://holidays.juda.com/passover-songs.shtml

The Ballad of the Four Sons
(to the tune of "Clementine")

wriiten by Ben Aronin in 1948

Said the father to his children,

"At the seder you will dine,

You will eat your fill of matzah,

You will drink four cups of wine."

Now this father had no daughters,

But his sons they numbered four.

One was wise and one was wicked,

One was simple and a bore.

And the fourth was sweet and winsome,

he was young and he was small.

While his brothers asked the questions

he could scarcely speak at all.

Said the wise one to his father

"Would you please explain the laws?

Of the customs of the seder

Will you please explain the cause?"

And the father proudly answered,

"As our fathers ate in speed,

Ate the paschal lamb 'ere midnight

And from slavery were freed."

So we follow their example

And 'ere midnight must complete

All the seder and we should not

After 12 remain to eat.

Then did sneer the son so wicked

"What does all this mean to you?"

And the father's voice was bitter

As his grief and anger grew.

"If you yourself don't consider

As son of Israel,

Then for you this has no meaning

You could be a slave as well."

Then the simple son said simply

"What is this," and quietly

The good father told his offspring

"We were freed from slavery."

But the youngest son was silent

For he could not ask at all.

His bright eyes were bright with wonder

As his father told him all.

My dear children, heed the lesson

and remember evermore

What the father told his children

Told his sons that numbered four.

-- Four Children

Everything that is really great and inspiring is created by the individual who can labor in freedom.

-- Exodus Story
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

-- Exodus Story

Leader: Let us retell our story now as we have learned it from biblical history.

Reader:  We lived in Egypt and the Pharaoh was gracious to us.

Reader:  But after some years a new Pharaoh arose who bound us into slavery and laid hard labor on us.

Reader:  The Pharaoh was afraid that we might multiply and rise up against him so he ordered that every newborn son of ours be cast into the Nile.

Reader:  One such child was hidden by his mother in a basket concealed in the bulrushes of the Nile.  He was found by an Egyptian prince who adopted him and named him Moses and raised him in the royal palace.

Reader:  One day when Moses was a grown man he saw an Egyptian beating a slave.  He set upon the Egyptian and killed him.  He then fled into the wilderness where he lived the life of a shepherd.

Reader:  And one day, he saw a bush that was burning but was not consumed by its own fire and he heard a voice that commanded him:  “Go down Moses, to Egypt to those who suffer,” said the voice.

Reader:  Tell them you will deliver them from their oppressors.  You will transform them from slaves into free men and you will lead them away from Egypt to a new land.

Go Down Moses

                                          When Israel was in Egypt land

Let my people go

Oppressed so hard they could not stand

Let my people go

Go down Moses, way down in Egypt land

Tell old Pharaoh, let my people go

When Moses took them from their toil

Let my people go.

He led them all to freedom’s soil

Let my people go

Go down Moses

Way down in Egypt land

Tell old Pharaoh

To let my people go.

Reader:  Moses went to the Pharaoh, but the Pharaoh refused to part with his slaves.  And because of that it is said the Egyptians suffered ten plagues.

Reader:  Their water was polluted, their land was overrun with frogs and wild beasts and vermin and insects, their grain was eaten by locusts, their bodies were infected with boils.  A storm of hailstones feel upon them and darkness was upon the land both night and day.

Reader:   The people of Egypt became fearful, but the Pharaoh would not release the slaves until the last plague, the death of the first born son in every Egyptian household.  This he could not endure and he told Moses to take the slaves out of Egypt.

Reader:  For forty years we wandered in the desert before coming to the land that had been promised.  More than five thousand years have elapsed since then.

Reader:  Years of feasting, years of famine, years of peace and years of war, years of freedom, years of oppression

Reader:  We have wandered over the face of the earth and everywhere we go we bring our love of freedom and the Ten Commandments.

-- Exodus Story

Oh listen, oh listen, oh listen King Pharaoh.  

Oh listen, oh listen, Please let my people go.  

They want to go away,

They work so hard all day,

King Pharaoh, King Pharaoh,

What do you say?  

No, No, No

I will not let them go.  

No, No, No,

I will not let them go.  

-- Exodus Story
Source : Abraham Lincoln Quote, Design by Haggadot.com

-- Exodus Story
Source : Center for Jewish History Archives

Photo by Center for Jewish History, NYC on Flickr

-- Exodus Story

Pay attention, children, because I want to tell you a true story about your ancient ancestors, our Hebrew god, and a little boy named Moshe. Moshe was a very special boy. Moshe was born to Hebrew slaves, and lived in Egypt, where there was an evil Pharoah. Pharoah declared all little boys must be killed! Moshe’s family did not want him to die! They made a little grass reed boat for him, and set him to float on the Nile River.

While they watched him float away, Pharoah’s daughter saw the little boat, and pulled Moshe out of the water and adopted him. She even asked Moshe’s mommy and sister Miriam to help take care of him.

-- Exodus Story
Source : BrickBible

-- Exodus Story
Source : http://www.bricktestament.com/exodus/

Sefer Shemot illustrated through LEGOs
-- Exodus Story

Behind them, the army of Pharaoh followed them into the water, but Yahweh knocked the wheels off their chariots to slow them and only then did Yahweh let the walls of the sea come down, trapping the whole army of Pharaoh and drowning them in an instant. The Hebrew slaves were FREE!!!

-- Exodus Story
Source : Abraham Joshua Heschel Quote, Design by Haggadot.com

-- Exodus Story
Source : @eileenmachine

-- Exodus Story
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

-- Exodus Story
by HIAS
Source : HIAS Seder Supplement

To use at the beginning of the Maggid, the telling of the Passover story.

The heart of the Passover Seder is the Maggid, meaning storytelling. Maggid comes from the same root as Haggadah, which means telling. The Maggid tells the story of the Jewish people’s exodus from slavery in Egypt. During the Maggid, we say the words, “ (Arami oved avi). ” This phrase is sometimes translated as “My father was a wandering Aramean” and other times as “An Aramean sought to destroy my father.” Somewhere between the two translations lies the essence of the Jewish experience: a rootless people who have fled persecution time and time again.

At this point in the Seder walk with your guests to your front door and place a pair of shoes on your doorstep and read together:

“As we recite the words ‘Arami oved avi,’ we acknowledge that we have stood in the shoes of the refugee. Today, as we celebrate our freedom, we commit ourselves to continuing to stand with contemporary refugees. In honor of this commitment, we place a pair of shoes on our doorstep of this home to acknowledge that none of us is free until all of us are free and to pledge to stand in support of welcoming those who do not yet have a place to call home.”

Invite family and friends to join you by placing a pair of shoes on their doorstep as well. Encourage them this Passover to support welcoming the world’s refugees and stand up against the xenophobia and hatred being levied against these most vulnerable people. You might also direct them to the HIAS website for ways they can amplify their support.

from the HIAS Seder Supplement http://www.hias.org/passover2016-supplement

-- Exodus Story
-- Exodus Story

It took a while, but every last Hebrew man, woman, child, and the mixed multitude who came with them had crossed the Red Sea.

-- Exodus Story
Source : PJ Library

The first Passover happened long ago in the far-away country of Egypt. A mean and powerful king, called Pharaoh, ruled Egypt. Worried that the Jewish people would one day fight against him, Pharaoh decided that these people must become his slaves. As slaves, the Jewish people worked very hard. Every day, from morning until night, they hammered, dug, and carried heavy bricks. They built palaces and cities and worked without rest. The Jewish people hated being slaves. They cried and asked God for help. God chose a man named Moses to lead the Jewish people.

Moses went to Pharaoh and said, “God is not happy with the way you treat the Jewish people. He wants you to let the Jewish people leave Egypt and go into the desert, where they will be free.” But Pharaoh stamped his foot and shouted, “No, I will never let the Jewish people go!” Moses warned, “If you do not listen to God, many terrible things, called plagues, will come to your land.”  But Pharaoh would not listen, and so the plagues arrived. First, the water turned to blood. Next, frogs and, later, wild animals ran in and out of homes. Balls of hail fell from the sky and bugs, called locusts, ate all of the Egyptians’ food.

Each time a new plague began, Pharaoh would cry, “Moses, I’ll let the Jewish people go. Just stop this horrible plague!” Yet no sooner would God take away the plague than Pharaoh would shout: “No, I’ve changed my mind. The Jews must stay!” So God sent more plagues. Finally, as the tenth plague arrived, Pharaoh ordered the Jews to leave Egypt.

Fearful that Pharaoh might again change his mind, the Jewish people packed quickly. They had no time to prepare food and no time to allow their dough to rise into puffy bread. They had only enough time to make a flat, cracker-like bread called matzah. They hastily tied the matzah to their backs and ran from their homes.

The people had not travelled far before Pharaoh commanded his army to chase after them and bring them back to Egypt. The Jews dashed forward, but stopped when they reached a large sea. The sea was too big to swim across. Frightened that Pharaoh’s men would soon reach them, the people prayed to God, and a miracle occurred. The sea opened up. Two walls of water stood in front of them and a dry, sandy path stretched between the walls. The Jews ran across. Just as they reached the other side, the walls of water fell and the path disappeared. The sea now separated the Jews from the land of Egypt. They were free!

Each year at Passover, we eat special foods, sing songs, tell stories, and participate in a seder – a special meal designed to help us remember this miraculous journey from slavery to freedom.

-- Exodus Story

When Israel was in Egypt’s land
Let my people go;
Oppressed so hard they could not stand,
Let my people go!

Chorus:
Go down, Moses,
Way down in Egypt’s land;
Tell ol’ Pharaoh,
Let my people go!

Thus saith the Lord, bold Moses said,
Let my people go;
If not I’ll smite your first born dead;
Let my people go!

Chorus

No more shall they in bondage toil
Let my people go;
Let them come out with Egypt’s spoil
Let my people go!

Chorus

We need not always weep and mourn
Let my people go;
And wear these slavery chains forlorn
Let my people go!

Chorus

When they had reached the other shore,
Let my people go;
They sang a song of triumph o'er.
Let my people go!

-- Exodus Story

He told Moses to tell the people to sacrifice a perfect lamb, and to put the lamb’s blood on the doorposts and on the top of the door. Then they were to cook the lamb and eat their food ready to leave, for they would be delivered that next day!

-- Exodus Story

At first our forefathers worshiped idols, but then the Omnipresent brought us near to divine service, as it is written: "Joshua said to all the people: so says the Lord God of Israel--your fathers have always lived beyond the Euphrates River, Terah the father of Abraham and Nahor; they worshipped other gods. I took your father Abraham from the other side of the river and led him through all the land of Canaan. I multiplied his family and gave him Isaac. To Isaac I gave Jacob and Esau; to Esau I gave Mount Seir to inherit, however Jacob and his children went down to Egypt."

Jacob and his children had arrived in Egypt to be close to Joseph; he was second in command to King Pharaoh, and with his ingenuity had saved the people of Egypt, and by extension those from neighboring countries, from death by famine. Jacob and his children were settled in the city of Goshen and prospered wonderfully--their numbers grew and grew.

-- Exodus Story

Pharaoh was beaten. He told Moshe to take the people and GO! They had to leave so quickly that they didn’t have time to let their bread rise, and instead they grabbed everything they could and ran away. Stopping only to get Joseph’s bones, they travelled through the wilderness. Yahweh sent a cloud by day, and a pillar of fire by night. Finally, they reached the beach of Nuaba, on the Gulf of Aqaba at the Red Sea. But they realized Pharoah had chased them with his army and chariots and was going to kill them all!! Oh, no!

-- Ten Plagues
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

-- Ten Plagues
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

As we rejoice at our deliverance from slavery, we acknowledge that our freedom was hard-earned. We regret that our freedom came at the cost of the Egyptians’ suffering, for we are all human beings made in the image of God. We pour out a drop of wine for each of the plagues as we recite them.

Dip a finger or a spoon into your wine glass for a drop for each plague.

These are the ten plagues which God brought down on the Egyptians:

Blood | dam | דָּם

Frogs | tzfardeiya |  צְפַרְדֵּֽעַ

Lice | kinim | כִּנִּים

Beasts | arov | עָרוֹב

Cattle disease | dever | דֶּֽבֶר

Boils | sh’chin | שְׁחִין

Hail | barad | בָּרָד

Locusts | arbeh | אַרְבֶּה

Darkness | choshech | חֹֽשֶׁךְ

Death of the Firstborn | makat b’chorot | מַכַּת בְּכוֹרוֹת

The Egyptians needed ten plagues because after each one they were able to come up with excuses and explanations rather than change their behavior. Could we be making the same mistakes? Make up your own list. What are the plagues in your life? What are the plagues in our world today? What behaviors do we need to change to fix them? 

-- Ten Plagues
-- Ten Plagues
Source : jason bennett

the miracle of this plague was that animals who normally live in different places and keep away from each other join together to fight the Egyptians.  

-- Ten Plagues
Source : jason bennett

all the animals that the Egyptians owned died but any sick or weak animal that belonged to a Jew became healthy and strong.

-- Ten Plagues
Source : jason bennett

Moshe threw up 4 handfuls of soot into the sky and all the Egyptians suffered painful boils all over their bodies

-- Ten Plagues
-- Ten Plagues
Source : http://www.thebricktestament.com/exodus/the_third_plague/ex08_17b.jpg


-- Ten Plagues
Source : blogs.indiewire.com

-- Ten Plagues

One morning when Pharaoh woke up in his bed 
There were frogs on his bed and frogs on his head 
Frogs on his nose and frogs on his toes
Frogs here
Frogs there
Frogs were jumping everywhere.

-- Ten Plagues
Source : JWA / Jewish Boston - The Wandering Is Over Haggadah; Including Women's Voices

The traditional Haggadah lists ten plagues that afflicted the Egyptians. We live in a very different world, but Passover is a good time to remember that, even after our liberation from slavery in Egypt, there are still many challenges for us to meet. Here are ten “modern plagues”:

Inequity - Access to affordable housing, quality healthcare, nutritious food, good schools, and higher education is far from equal. The disparity between rich and poor is growing, and opportunities for upward mobility are limited.

Entitlement - Too many people consider themselves entitled to material comfort, economic security, and other privileges of middle-class life without hard work.

Fear - Fear of “the other” produces and reinforces xenophobia, anti-immigrant sentiment, antisemitism, homophobia, and transphobia.

Greed - Profits are a higher priority than the safety of workers or the health of the environment. The top one percent of the American population controls 42% of the country’s financial wealth, while corporations send jobs off-shore and American workers’ right to organize and bargain collectively is threatened.

Distraction - In this age of constant connectedness, we are easily distracted by an unending barrage of information, much of it meaningless, with no way to discern what is important.

Distortion of reality - The media constructs and society accepts unrealistic expectations, leading to eating disorders and an unhealthy obsession with appearance for both men and women.

Unawareness - It is easy to be unaware of the consequences our consumer choices have for the environment and for workers at home and abroad. Do we know where or how our clothes are made? Where or how our food is produced? The working conditions? The impact on the environment?

Discrimination - While we celebrate our liberation from bondage in Egypt, too many people still suffer from discrimination. For example, blacks in the United States are imprisoned at more than five times the rate of whites, and Hispanics are locked up at nearly double the white rate. Women earn 77 cents for every dollar earned by a man. At 61 cents to the dollar, the disparity is even more shocking in Jewish communal organization.

Silence - Every year, 4.8 million cases of domestic violence against American women are reported. We do not talk about things that are disturbing, such as rape, sex trafficking, child abuse, domestic violence, and elder abuse, even though they happen every day in our own communities.

Feeling overwhelmed and disempowered - When faced with these modern “plagues,” how often do we doubt or question our own ability to make a difference? How often do we feel paralyzed because we do not know what to do to bring about change?

-- Ten Plagues
Source : Jews United for Justice

To persuade Pharaoh to let the Hebrew slaves go free, God brought ten plagues on the people of Egypt. In a traditional seder, we remove a drop of wine or juice from our glasses as we name each ancient plague, symbolizing that even as we celebrate our liberation, our joy is reduced by the suffering of the Egyptians. Tonight we remove a drop from our full cups after we read the names of ten Black lives lost to police violence:

Sean Bell

Kendrek McDade

Walter Scott

Rekia Boyd

Eric Garner

John Crawford III

Kimani Grey

Aiyana Stanley Jones

Tamir Rice

Michael Brown

-- Ten Plagues
-- Ten Plagues
-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

Let us drink our second cup of wine to Wisdom and Understanding.

To Wisdom and Understanding!

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

Dayenu means “it would have sufficed” or “we would have been satisfied.” Perhaps “grateful” would be a better translation. Dayenu is the song of our gratitude. A Jewish philosopher was once asked, “what is the opposite of hopelessness?” And he said, “Dayenu,” the ability to be thankful for what we have received, for what we are. The first prayer that a Jew is expected to recite upon waking expresses hir gratitude for being alive. This holds for all generations, and surely ours. For each of us, every day should be an act of grace, every hour a miraculous offering.

In many Sephardi and Mizrahi communities, the singing of Dayenu is accompanied by beating each other with leeks or scallions. Using bunches of scallions or leeks, Seder participants beat each other (lightly) on the back and shoulders to symbolize the taskmasters whip.

אִלּוּ הוֹצִיאָנוּ מִמִּצְרָיִם

דַּיֵּנוּ

אִלּוּ נָתַן לָנוּ אֶת הַשַּׁבָּת

דַּיֵּנוּ

אִלּוּ נָתַן לָנוּ אֶת הַתּוֹרָה

דַּיֵּנוּ

Ilu hotzi hotzianu hotzianu mi’mitzrayim Hotzianu mi’mitzrayim dayenu

(If you had only brought us out of Mitzrayim – Dayenu!)

Dai-dai-yenu, Dai-dai-yenu, Dai-dai-yenu Dai-yenu, Dai-yenu!

Ilu natan natan lanu natan lanu et ha'shabbat Natan lanu et ha'shabbat dayenu

(If you had only given us Shabbat – Dayenu!)

Dai-dai-yenu, Dai-dai-yenu, Dai-dai-yenu Dai-yenu, Dai-yenu! Ilu natan natan lanu natan lanu et ha'torah Natan lanu et ha'torah dayenu

(If you had only given us the Torah – Dayenu!)

Dai-dai-yenu, Dai-dai-yenu, Dai-dai-yenu Dai-yenu, Dai-yenu

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Orginial

We are grateful that we are together on this night as a family ~ Dayenu

We are grateful that we are together to share this moment ~ Dayenu

We are grateful that we are together, alive and healthy ~ Dayenu

We are grateful that we are able to eat together ~ Dayenu

We are grateful that we have a light shining upon us ~ Dayenu

We are grateful for everything and everyone that we have ~ Dayenu

We are grateful for all that has touched our lives ~Dayenu

We are grateful that our ancestors never gave up home, and to them we drink the second glass of wine together ~ Dayenu

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Abraham Joshua Heschel, Design by Haggadot.com

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
no one leaves home unless home is the mouth of a shark.

you only run for the border when you see the whole city running as well.

no one would leave home unless home chased you, fire under feet, hot blood in your belly.

it's not something you ever thought about doing, and so when you did - you carried the anthem under your breath, waiting until the airport toilet to tear up the passport and swallow, each mouthful of paper making it clear that you would not be going back. you have to understand, no one puts their children in a boat unless the water is safer than the land.

who would choose to spend days and nights in the stomach of a truck unless the miles travelled meant something more than journey.

and if you survive and you are greeted on the other side with go home blacks, refugees dirty immigrants, asylum seekers sucking our country dry of milk, dark, with their hands out smell strange, savage - look what they've done to their own countries, what will they do to ours?

for now, forget about pride your survival is more important. i want to go home, but home is the mouth of a shark home is the barrel of the gun and no one would leave home unless home chased you to the shore unless home tells you to leave what you could not behind, even if it was human. no one leaves home until home is a damp voice in your ear saying leave, run now, i don't know what i've become.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
by J F

The Second Cup of the delicious Dagobah Drink

בָּרוּךְ אתה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ העוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר גְּאָלָנוּ וְגָּאַל אֶת אֲבוֹתֵינוּ מִמִּצְרַים , וְהִגִּיעָנוּ לַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה לֶאֱכָל בּוֹ מַצָּה וּמָרוֹר. כֵּן יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ וֵאלֹהֵי אֲבוֹתֵינוּ יַגִּיעֵנוּ לְמוֹעֲדִים וְלִרְגָלִים אֲחֵרִים הַבָּאִים לִקְרָאתֵנוּ לְשָׁלוֹם, שְׂמֵחִים בְּבִנְיַן עִירֶךָ וְשָׂשִׂים בַּעֲבוֹדָתֶךָ. וְנֹאכַל שָׁם מִן הַזְּבָחִים וּמִן הַפְּסָחִים אֲשֶׁר יַגִּיעַ דָּמָם עַל קִיר מִזְבַּחֲךָ לְרָצוֹן, וְנוֹדֶה לְךָ שִׁיר חָדָש עַל גְּאֻלָּתֵנוּ ועַל פְּדוּת נַפְשֵׁנוּ. בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי גָּאַל יִשְׂרָאֵל.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָפֶן.

Baruch atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha’olam, asher g’alanu v’ga’al et avoteinu mimitzrayim, v’higianu lalaylah hazeh le’echol bo matzah umaror. Kein Adonai Eloheinu vEilohei avoteinu yagi’einu l’mo’adim v’lirgalim acheirim haba’im likrateinu l’shalom, s’meichim b’vinyan irecha v’sasim ba’avodatecha. V’nochal sham min hazvachim umin hapsachim asher yagia damam al kir mizbachacha l’ratzon, v’nodeh l’cha shir chadash al g’ulateinu v’al p’dut nafsheinu. Baruch Atah Adonai, ga’al Yisrael.

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech haolam, borei p’ri hagafen.

Praised are you, Adonai, our God, sovereign of the universe, who has redeemed us and our fathers from Egypt and enabled us to reach this night that we may eat matzo and marror. Lord our God and God of our fathers, enable us to reach also the forthcoming holidays and festivals in peace, rejoicing in the rebuilding of Zion your city, and joyful at your service. There we shall eat of the offerings and Passover sacrifices which will be acceptably placed upon your altar. We shall sing a new hymn of praise to you for our redemption and for our liberation. Praised are you, Adonai, who has redeemed Israel.

Praised are you, Adonai, our God, sovereign of the universe, who has created the fruit of the vine.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
A Cup to our Teachers: To those we have known and those whose work has inspired us, and made space for our lives. We are grateful to you who did and said things for the first time, who claimed and reclaimed our traditions, who forged new tools. Thank you to the teachers around us of all ages-- the people we encounter everyday--who live out their values in small and simple ways, and who are our most regular and loving reminders of the world we are creating together. (Love and Justice Haggadah)

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We thank a higher power, shaper and maker, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the second glass of wine!

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Original Illustration from Haggadot.com

Scallions Aren’t Just For Eating: There is a Persian custom of hitting each other with scallions during Dayenu. The scallions represent the whips of our oppressors. Although this may seem a little morbid, young and old alike have a wonderful time violating social norms and slamming each other with green onions. - Rachel Kobrin, My JewishLearning.com

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Original Illustration from Haggadot.com

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Original Illustration from Haggadot.com

Rachtzah
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

Rachtzah

What a blessing to have friends at our table with whom to share this meal.

Motzi-Matzah
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

Motzi-Matzah
Source : http://www.manischewitz.com/assets/jahm/ads/scroll_1888.php

Motzi-Matzah

Some inspiration!

Motzi-Matzah
Source : OurJewishCommunity.org

Matzah is both a reminder of our past and a symbol of our future. It was first used to celebrate the spring festival when our farming ancestors threw out their sour dough — the leavening — and baked unleavened bread to welcome the New Year.

Later the Matzah became associated with the Exodus from Egypt. As the Torah says, “And they baked unleavened bread from the dough which they brought out of Egypt. There was not sufficient time to allow it to rise, for they were fleeing Egypt and could not wait.” Matzah recalls the slavery of our ancestors, their triumph over tyranny.

In our own generation, Matzah has become a symbol of hope, urging us to speak for those who do not yet know freedom. We who celebrate Passover commit ourselves to the continuing struggle against oppression. We become the voices for those locked within prison cells, for those exiled from their homes, their families, their communities. We who know freedom are the guardians of their ideas.

(Eat Matzah)

Motzi-Matzah

What a blessing to live in a world in which grass in the field can turn into bread.

What a blessing to come from a culture that has such a rich story to tell, so full of symbols, like these matzot.

Motzi-Matzah
Source : JewishBoston.com

The blessing over the meal and matzah | motzi matzah | מוֹצִיא מַצָּה

The familiar hamotzi blessing marks the formal start of the meal. Because we are using matzah instead of bread, we add a blessing celebrating this mitzvah.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, הַמּוֹצִיא לֶֽחֶם מִן הָאָֽרֶץ

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, hamotzi lechem min ha-aretz.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who brings bread from the land.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתַָיו וְצִוָּֽנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מַצָּה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat matzah.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to eat matzah.

Distribute and eat the top and middle matzah for everyone to eat.

Motzi-Matzah
Q: What do you call someone who  derives pleasure from the bread of  affliction?

A: A matzochist.

Maror
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

Maror
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

We have now told the story of Passover…but wait! We’re not quite done. There are still some symbols on our seder plate we haven’t talked about yet. Rabban Gamliel would say that whoever didn’t explain the shank bone, matzah, and marror (or bitter herbs) hasn’t done Passover justice.

The shank bone represents the Pesach, the special lamb sacrifice made in the days of the Temple for the Passover holiday. It is called the pesach, from the Hebrew word meaning “to pass over,” because God passed over the houses of our ancestors in Egypt when visiting plagues upon our oppressors.

The matzah reminds us that when our ancestors were finally free to leave Egypt, there was no time to pack or prepare. Our ancestors grabbed whatever dough was made and set out on their journey, letting their dough bake into matzah as they fled.

The bitter herbs provide a visceral reminder of the bitterness of slavery, the life of hard labor our ancestors experienced in Egypt.

Maror
Source : JewishBoston.com

Dipping the bitter herb in sweet charoset | maror  |מָרוֹר   

  In creating a holiday about the joy of freedom, we turn the story of our bitter history into a sweet celebration. We recognize this by dipping our bitter herbs into the sweet charoset. We don’t totally eradicate the taste of the bitter with the taste of the sweet… but doesn’t the sweet mean more when it’s layered over the bitterness?

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָּֽנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מרוֹר

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat maror.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to eat bitter herbs.

Maror
Source : The Workmen's Circle Seder for a Better World, An Activist's Hagodeh

"We were always, in the depths of our hearts, completely free men and women. We were slaves on the outside, but free men and women in soul and spirit."

-Rabbi Judah Loew, The Maharal of Prague (1525-1609)

Maror
Source : Original Illustration from Haggadot.com

Koreich
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

Koreich
Source : JewishBoston.com

Eating a sandwich of matzah and bitter herb | koreich | כּוֹרֵךְ

When the Temple stood in Jerusalem, the biggest ritual of them all was eating the lamb offered as the pesach or Passover sacrifice. The great sage Hillel would put the meat in a sandwich made of matzah, along with some of the bitter herbs. While we do not make sacrifices any more – and, in fact, some Jews have a custom of purposely avoiding lamb during the seder so that it is not mistaken as a sacrifice – we honor this custom by eating a sandwich of the remaining matzah and bitter herbs. Some people will also include charoset in the sandwich to remind us that God’s kindness helped relieve the bitterness of slavery.

Koreich

"Michelle and I send our warmest greetings to all those celebrating Passover in the United States, in the State of Israel, and throughout the world.

Tonight, for the seventh year, I’ll hold a Seder in the White House, and we’ll join millions of Jewish families as we retell one of humanity’s great stories of liberation (...). 

The story of the Exodus (...) has inspired countless generations over the years.  It inspired Jewish families to hold fast to their faith, even during times of terrible persecution.  It inspired young Civil Rights leaders as they marched across an Alabama bridge in search of their own Promised Land, half a century ago.

And it continues to inspire us today.  Tonight, my family will read the passage of the Haggadah that declares we must see ourselves as though we personally were liberated from Egypt.  The Exodus reminds us that progress has always come slow and the future has always been uncertain, but it also reminds there is always reason for hope.

Like the Israelites who Moses led out of slavery long ago, it is up to us to never lose faith in the better day that lies ahead.  In our own country, we can continue our march toward a more perfect union.  Around the world, we can seek to extend the miracles of freedom and peace, prosperity and security, to more of God’s creation.  And together, we can continue the hard but awesome work of tikkun olam, and do our part to repair the world. From my family to yours, Chag Sameach.

(Statement from the President on Passover, White House, April 2015). 

Shulchan Oreich
Source : JewishBoston.com

Eating the meal! | shulchan oreich | שֻׁלְחָן עוֹרֵךְ Enjoy! But don’t forget when you’re done we’ve got a little more seder to go, including the final two cups of wine!

Tzafun
Source : JewishBoston.com

Finding and eating the Afikomen | tzafoon | צָפוּן

The playfulness of finding the afikomen reminds us that we balance our solemn memories of slavery with a joyous celebration of freedom. As we eat the afikomen, our last taste of matzah for the evening, we are grateful for moments of silliness and happiness in our lives.

Tzafun

Caption: refugee and French Jewish orphans celebrate Passover together in 1947. Credit: American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee
Tzafun
Tzafun

“So who has found the afikomen?” we ask. The finders hold the napkin-covered matzah tightly in their hands and are determined to bargain. It is a part of our lesson plan—this small rebellion. Each year we teach a new generation to resist bondage, to envision someplace better, to savor freedom, and to take responsibility for the journeys of their lives. And each year with the afikomen ritual, they hold power in their hands, just long enough to say, “yes” or “no” with all eyes on them. With people waiting. “We can’t finish the seder without it.” Just long enough to learn to ask for what they want.

For two thousand years, the Jewish people have been separated from our families and from our nations, though our ancient culture survives and grows. For hundreds of years the book of Genesis has been interpreted as justifying human domination and destruction of the earth, though it tells of the beauty of creation. For decades, Jews and Muslims have been reinforcing the wall between them, though its foundation was laid by colonists and its height is built up to serve foreign military interests. Let us stop fighting each other for someone else’s profit. Let us remember our kinship and learn how each other has grown in the years since we stopped listening. May we humble ourselves before history and before one another, and make the world whole again. (from "Love and Justice in Times of War" Haggadah)

Bareich
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

Bareich

Now let us drink our third cup of wine to Hope.

To Hope!

Hallel
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

Hallel

It is traditional to fill a cup with wine for the Prophet Elijah. Now let fill Elijah’s cup and open our door to him, to symbolize our freedom of worship and hope that he will enter and bring with him the coming of a more perfect world of justice and joy for all mankind.  Will you please open the door?  

Hallel
Source : Original Illustration from Haggadot.com

Hallel
Source : Pesach: A Season of Justice

This new custom celebrates Miriam’s role in the deliverance from slavery and her help throughout the wandering in the wilderness. An empty cup is placed alongside Elijah’s cup. Each attendee at the Seder then pours a bit of his/her water into the cup, symbolizing Miriam’s life-giving well that followed the wandering Israelites. With this new custom, we recognize that women are equally integral to the continued survival of the Jewish community. With a social action lens, we see the pouring of each person’s water as a symbol of everyone’s individual responsibility to respond to issues of social injustice, and that, together, significant actions can take place.

Hallel
Source : Image from NYTimes.com

#ShePersisted

Hallel

Let us drink our fourth cup of wine to Faith.

To Faith!

Hallel
Source : @eileenmachine

Hallel
Source : Telling the Story: A Passover Haggadah Explained

There is a word in Hebrew — Teshuvah — that means return. It is an acknowledgement that there is always a chance for forgiveness, redemption and change. Our traditions teach that Passover is open to all. Everyone is welcome at this table. There is always room. Because no one is ever turned away, there is always an opportunity for a rebirth of spirit.

As a sign of hospitality to all, we open the door to our homes and symbolically invite anyone who wants to join us to come inside.

At this point, the children open the door.

Hallel
Source : adapted from The Refugee Crisis Haggadah by Repair the World

We are going to conclude our dinner tonight with a celebratory toast - a l’chaim.

Rather than filling our own cup tonight, though, and focusing on us as individuals, let’s fill someone else’s cup and recognize that, as a family and group of friends, we have the resources to help each other and those in our community if we are willing to share our resources and collaborate – whether those resources are time, money, skills, or any of the other gifts we bring to one another.

Many of us around the table may already share our resources in different ways - volunteering in our communities, providing pro bono services, donating to charities, or by advocating or lobbying officials. For others we may still be exploring the ways we’re hoping to share our resources and are looking for outlets to do so.

We are now going to fill our 4th cup of wine and I want to invite you to fill someone else’s cup instead of your own. As you fill someone else’s cup, let’s share with each other our answer to the following:

How can I help in changing the world?

Nirtzah
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

Nirtzah
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

Nirtzah  marks the conclusion of the seder. Our bellies are full, we have had several glasses of wine, we have told stories and sung songs, and now it is time for the evening to come to a close. At the end of the seder, we honor the tradition of declaring, “Next year in Jerusalem!”

For some people, the recitation of this phrase expresses the anticipation of rebuilding the Temple in Jerusalem and the return of the Messiah. For others, it is an affirmation of hope and of connectedness with  Klal Yisrael, the whole of the Jewish community. Still others yearn for peace in Israel and for all those living in the Diaspora.

Though it comes at the end of the seder, this moment also marks a beginning. We are beginning the next season with a renewed awareness of the freedoms we enjoy and the obstacles we must still confront. We are looking forward to the time that we gather together again. Having retold stories of the Jewish people, recalled historic movements of liberation, and reflected on the struggles people still face for freedom and equality, we are ready to embark on a year that we hope will bring positive change in the world and freedom to people everywhere.

In  The Leader's Guide to the Family Participation Haggadah: A Different Night, Rabbi David Hartman writes: “Passover is the night for reckless dreams; for visions about what a human being can be, what society can be, what people can be, what history may become.”

What can  we  do to fulfill our reckless dreams? What will be our legacy for future generations?

Our seder is over, according to Jewish tradition and law. As we had the pleasure to gather for a seder this year, we hope to once again have the opportunity in the years to come. We pray that God brings health and healing to Israel and all the people of the world, especially those impacted by natural tragedy and war. As we say…

לְשָׁנָה הַבָּאָה בִּירוּשָׁלָֽיִם

L’shana haba-ah biy’rushalayim

NEXT YEAR IN JERUSALEM!

Nirtzah
And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal." I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood. I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today! I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of "interposition" and "nullification" -- one day right there in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. I have a dream today! I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, and every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight; "and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together."2 This is our hope, and this is the faith that I go back to the South with. With this faith, we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith, we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith, we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day. And this will be the day -- this will be the day when all of God's children will be able to sing with new meaning: My country 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the Pilgrim's pride, From every mountainside, let freedom ring! And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true. And so let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania. Let freedom ring from the snow-capped Rockies of Colorado. Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California. But not only that: Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia. Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee. Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring. And when this happens, and when we allow freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual: Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!
Nirtzah
Source : Rabbi Ruth Abusch-Magder

May we all be released from the narrow places that constrict us. May the slavery and oppression that exists in all corners of the world be ended. May we recall the suffering of the past and be inspired to make the world a better place. Happy Passover, and may we all find the freedom and redemption we need.

Nirtzah
Source : @eileenmachine

I change myself, I change the world.” ― Gloria E. Anzaldúa

"Still I Rise” ― Maya Angelou

Nirtzah
Source : Harold M. Schulweis / Jewish World Watch

Founded in 2004, Jewish World Watch mobilizes against genocide and mass atrocities through education, advocacy and projects serving survivors of acts of inhumanity. JWW currently is working with survivors of conflict in Myanmar (Burma), Syria, Sudan, South Sudan, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
Conclusion

The little man looked at his face and saw himself black

And he cried “why me?”

Then he rubbed and scraped until all the tenderness was gone

And his child who watched him said “Father do not change from me”

And the little man wept and saw himself clean.

Conclusion

Postscript—to those of you who are wondering if Marcos is homosexual, Marcos is a gay person in San Francisco, a black person in south Africa, an Asian person in Europe, a Chicano in San Isidro, an anarchist in Spain, an indigenous person in the streets of San Cristobal, a gang member in Neza, a rocker in the Former Soviet Union, a Jew in Germany, an ombudsman in Sedena, a feminist in a political party, a Communist in the post Cold War, a prisoner in Cintalapa, a pacifist in Bosnia, a Mapuche in the Andes, an artist without a gallery, a guerilla in Mexico at the end of the 20th century, a sexist in the feminist movement, a lone woman in a Metro station at 10 pm, a retired person standing around in el Zocalo, a peasant without land, an underground editor, a non conformist student, a dissident against neo-liberalism, a writer without readers and a Zapatista in southeastern Mexico.

In other words, Marcos is a human being in this world.  Marcos is every untolerated, oppressed, exploited minority that is resisting and saying “Enough already!”  He is every minority who is beginning to speak and every majority that must shut up and listen.  He is every untolerated group searching for a way to speak.  Everything that makes Power and the good consciences of those in power uncomfortable—this is Marcos.

Subcomandante Marcos

Chiapas, Mexico 

Conclusion

The traditional aspiration, "Next Year in Jerusalem," is our people's millennia-old hope for redemption.

Together, this year, may we help to achieve....

Peace in societies torn by war

Freedom from bigotry and oppression

Equality for minorities shunned by prejudice and hatred

Respect for the aspirations and humanity of women and girls

Acceptance for people persecuted for who they are or whom they love

Sustenance for communities living in hunger

A safe harbor for refugees and survivors of violence

And the promise of dignity and human rights for all.

Together we pray: "Next year in a more just world." And through our actions from this Passover to the next, let us make this dream a reality.

Conclusion
Source : Compilation

As our Seder draws to a close, this Haggadah declares a final reminder to you that this Pesach heralds the beginning of a change for each of us. Our eyes are open to the injustices and oppression that fills the world, and the responsibility that our freedom demands of us, and it is now up to each of us how we use this knowledge. Will we choose to forget or will we choose to act? The ball is in your court, and I invite each of you to be partners. Let's change the world together.

Everyone: May slavery give way to freedom. May hate give way to love. May ignorance give way to wisdom. May despair give way to hope. Next year, at this time, may everyone, everywhere, be free!

Conclusion
Source : McSweeny's

REJECTED BEN & JERRY’S PASSOVER FLAVORS

ALEX BERNSTEIN

Why is this ice cream different from all other ice creams?

Bread O’ Affliction! – Sure, we wanted to use real bread, but who has the time?!

Hillel Sandwich – Made from the old Rebbe’s secret recipe! Where’s Elijah when ya need him?!

Burn Bush Burn! – Our spiciest ice cream peppered with Red Hots! You’ll never quite consume it!

Two Plagues Twisted! – Boils and locusts swirled together with a rich Red Sea core!

Gephilte Phish! – Random, minced fish pieces in a fabulous jellied froth!

Let My People Go Eat Ice Cream! – From Yahweh’s mouth to your freezer! Right now!

Karpas-tacular! – It really is!

Son Who Don’t Know How to Ask!– We mixed in not one, not two—but four cups of wine!! You don’t have to be wicked or wise (or simple, even!) to love this combination!

Coffee-Komen! – If the kids find it, YOU get the prize!

Hadgadyattahaveit! – With actual lamb’s blood mixed in—not even the Angel of Death will “pass over” this treat! Yum!

Commentary / Readings

What part of Passover do pirates love the most? The sed arrrrrrr

Why do we have a Haggadah at Passover? So we can seder right words

What's the best cheese to eat on Passover? Matza-rella

Songs
Source : JewishBoston.com

Chad Gadya

חַד גַּדְיָא, חַד גַּדְיָא

דְזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי

חַד גַּדְיָא, חַד גַּדְיָא

Chad gadya, chad gadya

Dizabin abah bitrei zuzei

Chad gadya, chad gadya.

One little goat, one little goat:

Which my father brought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The cat came and ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The dog came and bit the cat

That ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The stick came and beat the dog

That bit the cat that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The fire came and burned the stick

That beat the dog that bit the cat

That ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The water came and extinguished the

Fire that burned the stick

That beat the dog that bit the cat

That ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The ox came and drank the water

That extinguished the fire

That burned the stick that beat the dog That bit the cat that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The butcher came and killed the ox,

That drank the water

That extinguished the fire

That burned the stick that beat the dog That bit the cat that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The angle of death came and slew

The butcher who killed the ox,

That drank the water

That extinguished the fire

That burned the stick that beat the dog That bit the cat that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The Holy One, Blessed Be He came and

Smote the angle of death who slew

The butcher who killed the ox,

That drank the water

That extinguished the fire

That burned the stick that beat the dog That bit the cat that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

Songs
Source : Time of Israel

Songs
Source : Adaptation by Brandi Ullian

Who knows one? I know one!

One is Hashem, one is Hashem, one is Hashem!

In the heaven and the earth, ah, ooh ah ah,

I say ooh, ah, ooh ah ah

Who knows two? I know two!

Two are the tablets that Moses brought,

And one is Hashem, one is Hashem, one is Hashem,

In the heaven and the earth, ah, ooh ah ah,

I say ooh, ah, ooh ah ah

(Repeat with the following:)

Three are the Papas

Four are the Mommas

Five are the books of the Torah (clap)

Six are the books of the Mishna ( written version of the Jewish oral law) (clap)

Seven are the days of the week (clap,clap)

Eight are the days before a Bris (circumcision) (clap)

Nine are the months before a baby is born (clap)

Ten are the commandments (hands in the air for this one!)

Eleven are the stars in Joseph’s dream

Twelve are the tribes of Israel

Thirteen are the ways Hashem is good

Songs

Charoset’s oh-so-sweet!
Maror’s a bitter treat.
It’s on the seder plate (mm-mm).
It’s on the seder plate (mm-mm). Leave Elijah’s cup alone.
The egg and the shank bone,
They’re on the seder plate (mm-mm). On the seder plate (mm-mm).

And I’ll keep proving,
As I do my Jew thing,
It’s like I’ve got Mitzrayim
In my mind, saying it’s gonna be alright.

Middle matzah’s gonna break, break, break, break, break,
The gefilte fish will flake, flake, flake, flake, flake,
But you know I won’t forsake, sake, sake, sake, sake... any bite, any bite. The brisket’s gonna bake, bake, bake, bake, bake,
And my belly’s gonna ache, ache, ache, ache, ache,
But you know I won’t forsake, sake, sake, sake, sake... any bite, any bite.

I know why I recline,
And I drink four cups of wine, On this Jewish holiday (mm-mm). This Jewish holiday (mm-mm). The Hagaddah that we read,
The afikomen that we seek,
On this Jewish holiday (mm-mm). This Jewish holiday (mm-mm).

And I’ll keep proving,
As I do my Jew thing,
It’s like I’ve got Mitzrayim
In my mind, saying it’s gonna be alright.

Middle matzah’s gonna break, break, break, break, break,
The gefilte fish will flake, flake, flake, flake, flake,
But you know I won’t forsake, sake, sake, sake, sake... any bite, any bite. The brisket’s gonna bake, bake, bake, bake, bake,
And my belly’s gonna ache, ache, ache, ache, ache,
But you know I won’t forsake, sake, sake, sake, sake... any bite, any bite. 

Songs

To the tune of , of course, "Take Me Out to the Ballgame!"

Take me out to the Seder, take me out with the crowd.

Read the Haggadah and don't skip a word.

Please hold your talking, we want to be heard.

And lets, root, root, root for the leader, that they will finish their shpiel

So we can nosh, nosh, nosh and by-gosh, let's eat the meal!

Take me out to the Seder, take me out with the crowd.

Feed me on matzah and chicken legs, I don't care for the hard-boiled eggs.

And its root, root, root for Elijah, that he will soon reappear.

And let's hope, hope, hope that we'll meet once again next year!

Songs

My Favorite Things

 [Sung to the tune of "These are a few of my favorite things"]

Cleaning and cooking and so many dishes

Out with the hametz, no pasta, no knishes

Fish that's gefilted, horseradish that stings

These are a few of our Passover things.

 Matzoh and karpas and chopped up haroset

 Shankbones and Kiddish and Yiddish neuroses

 Tante who kvetches and uncle who sings

 These are a few of our Passover things.

 Motzi and maror and trouble with Pharoahs

 Famines and locusts and slaves with wheelbarrows

 Matzoh balls floating and eggshell that cling

 These are a few of our Passover things.

 When the plagues strike

 When the lice bite

 When we're feeling sad

 We simply remember our Passover things

 And then we don't feel so bad.

 There's No Seder Like our Seder

 (sung to the tune of "There's no Business like Show business")

 There's no seder like our seder,

 There's no seder I know.

 Everything about it is Halachic

 nothing that the Torah won't allow.

 Listen how we read the whole Haggadah

 It's all in Hebrew

 'Cause we know how.

 There's no Seder like our seder,

 We tell a tale that is swell:

 Moses took the people out into the heat

 They baked the matzoh

 While on their feet

 Now isn't that a story

 That just can't be beat?

 Let's go on with the show!

 Take Us Out of Egypt

 (sung to the tune of "Take me out to the ball game")

 Take us out of Egypt

 Free us from slavery

 Bake us some matzoh in a haste

 Don't worry 'bout flavor--

 Give no thought to taste.

 Oh it's rush, rush, rush, to the Red Sea

If we don't cross it's a shame.

 For it's ten plagues,

 Down and you're out

 At the Pesach history game.

Take me out to the Seder

Take me out to the crowd.

Feed me some matzah and kosher wine,

We’ll wine and dine and we’ll have a good time.

For we’ll root for Moshe Rabbeinu

And our crossing through the Red Sea.

For it’s one, two, okay four cups of wine,

We rejoice that we are free!

The Ballad of the Four Sons

 (to the tune of "Clementine")

 Said the father to his children, "At the seder you will dine,

 You will eat your fill of matzoh, you will drink four cups of

 wine."

 Now this father had no daughters, but his sons they numbered four.

 One was wise and one was wicked, one was simple and a bore.

 And the fourth was sweet and winsome, he was young and he was

 small.

 While his brothers asked the questions he could scarcely speak at

 all.

 Said the wise one to his father, "Would you please explain the

 laws?

 Of the customs of the seder, will you please explain the cause?"

 And the father proudly answered, "As our fathers ate in speed,

 Ate the paschal lamb 'ere midnight, and from slavery were freed."

 So we follow their example, and 'ere midnight must complete

 All the seder and we should not, after 12 remain to eat.

 Then did sneer the son so wicked, "What does all this mean to you?"

 And the father's voice was bitter, as his grief and anger grew.

 "If you yourself don't consider, a son of Israel,

 Then for you this has no meaning, you could be a slave as well."

 Then the simple son said simply, "What is this," and quietly

 The good father told his offspring, "We were freed from slavery."

 But the youngest son was silent, for he could not ask at all.

 His bright eyes were bright with wonder as his father told him all.

 My dear children, heed the lesson and remember ever more

 What the father told his children told his sons that numbered four.

Gilligan’s Island

Recline right back and you’ll hear a tale,

A tale of a fateful trip

That started many years ago in old, ancient Egypt.

The Jews were forced to work as slaves,

They suffered that ordeal;

We celebrate their Exodus with a three hour meal,

A three hour meal!

The Pharaoh was an evil dude,

His wrath would not repent

If not for the effort of the fearless Jews,

We’d all be keeping lent,

Yes, we’d all be keeping lent!

They landed in the desert after parting the Red Sea,

With Moses, and Aaron too, each Israelite and his wife,

A movie star, the Professor and Miriam…

Here on Passover night!

Songs

We shall overcome, we shall overcome,
We shall overcome someday.
Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe,
We shall overcome someday.

The truth will make us free, the truth will make us free,
The truth will make us free someday,
Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe,
We shall overcome someday.

We’ll walk hand in hand, we’ll walk hand in hand,
We’ll walk hand in hand someday.
Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe,
We shall overcome someday.

We are not afraid, we are not afraid,
We are not afraid today.
Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe,
We shall overcome someday.

The truth will make us free, the truth will make us free,
The truth will make us free someday,
Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe,
We shall overcome someday.

We shall overcome, we shall overcome,
We shall overcome someday.
Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe,
We shall overcome someday.

Songs
Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses (to the tune of "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious")

Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses The story of the Passover our Seder meal discloses Reminds us that the life of slaves was not a bed of roses Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses

Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ai Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ai

The Jews were bound in Egypt and were feeling rather low So Moses went to Pharaoh and said “Let my people go.” Pharoah said “Be gone with you,” which wasn’t very nice So God commenced a run of plagues including frogs and lice.

Oh, Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses The story of the Passover our Seder meal discloses We will eat gefilte fish, though some will hold their noses Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses

Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ai Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ai

The plagues were unrelenting and included hail and boils Not to mention dreadful fates for Egypt's boys and goils. Pharaoh he surrendered, then with slightly soggy feet The Jews walked to their freedom and that’s it, come on, let’s eat!

Oh, Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses The story of the Passover our Seder meal discloses Finish the Haggadah before anybody dozes Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses

Songs

עֹשֶׂה שָׁלום בִמְרומָיו, הוא יַעֲשֶׂה שָׁלום עָלֵינו וְעַל כָל. יִשְׂראַל. וְאִמְרו אָמֵן.

O-SEH SHA-LOM BI-M’RO-MAV, HU YA-A-SEH SHA-LOM A-LEI-NU V’AL KOL YIS-RA-EIL V’I-ME-RU, A-MEIN.

Songs

Goodbye, goodbye, Mitzrayim

Mitzrayim, Mitzrayim, goodbye

We’re sick of building the pyramids

Losing our first born kids

So Mitzrayim, goodbye!

To us and our good fortune!

To Moses and to Adonai!

Say adios fo the overseer

We’re getting out of here

So Mitzrayim Goodbye!

God told Moses, There’s a simple message

That the Pharaoh really needs to know.

Take your rod and take your brother Aaron

Tell the Pharaoh, “Let my people go”.

To us and our good fortune!

To Moses and to Adonai!

Say adios to our overseer

We’re getting out of here

So Mitzrayim, goodbye!

Songs
Source : Adaptation by Brandi Ullian

"We Shall Overcome" is a protest song that became a key anthem of the Civil Rights Movement. The original source of "We Shall Overcome" was a gospel hymn entitled "If My Jesus Wills", composed sometime between 1932 and 1942, and copyrighted in 1954 by African-American Baptist choir director, Louise Shropshire. Shropshire was a close friend, civil rights ally and spiritual confidant of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

We Shall Overcome

We shall overcome, we shall overcome,
We shall overcome someday.
Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe,
We shall overcome someday.

We’ll walk hand in hand, we’ll walk hand in hand,
We’ll walk hand in hand someday.
Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe,
We shall overcome someday.

We are not afraid, we are not afraid,
We are not afraid today.
Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe,
We shall overcome someday.

We shall all be free, we shall all be free,
We shall all be free someday,
Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe,
We shall overcome someday.

We shall overcome, we shall overcome,
We shall overcome someday.
Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe,
We shall overcome someday.

Songs
Source : Pete Seeger, http://youtu.be/RJUkOLGLgwg
Songs
Source : Original: Esther D. Kustanowitz

Origin Story: Someone I know kept saying "Gal Gadot," the name of the Israeli actress who plays "Wonder W oman" in the DC Movie Universe. The more she said it, the more my brain kept singing her name to "Chad Gadya," the Aramaic song about the one little goat. And so, this parody version was born, celebrating the narrative spirit of the traditional Passover song with all the plot spoilers of the 2017 film, Wonder Woman, starring Gal Gadot.

While this version of the Chad Gadya has no goats - and really, very little relation to the song Chad Gadya - it can provide a pop culture chuckle at the end of a long seder. Or maybe in the middle, depending on how big your four cups of wine are. Enjoy!

- Esther D. Kustanowitz

Gal Gadot (to the tune of Chad Gadya

Gal Gadoooot, Gal Gadot!

1. Wonder Woman was really exciting, Gal Gadoooot, Gal Gadot!

2. Justice League left a lot to be desired, Wonder Woman was really exciting, Gal Gadoooot, Gal Gadot!

3. Patty Jenkins is a great director, Justice League left a lot to be desired, Wonder Woman was really exciting, Gal Gadoooot, Gal Gadot!

4. She discovers babies, love and ice cream, Patty Jenkins is a great director, Justice League left a lot to be desired, Wonder Woman was really exciting, Gal Gadoooot, Gal Gadot!

5. Diana leaves her mom to go to London, she discovers babies, love and ice cream, Patty Jenkins is a great director, Justice League left a lot to be desired, Wonder Woman was really exciting, Gal Gadoooot, Gal Gadot!

6. Steve Trevor brought war to Themyscira, Diana leaves her mom to go to London, she discovers babies, love and ice cream, Patty Jenkins is a great director, Justice League left a lot to be desired, Wonder Woman was really exciting, Gal Gadoooot, Gal Gadot!

7. David Thewlis is obviously the villain, Steve Trevor brought war to Themyscira, Diana leaves her mom to go to London, she discovers babies, love and ice cream, Patty Jenkins is a great director, Justice League left a lot to be desired, Wonder Woman was really exciting, Gal Gadoooot, Gal Gadot!

8. Antiope's her aunt who didn't make it, David Thewlis is obviously the villain, Steve Trevor brought war to Themyscira, Diana leaves her mom to go to London, she discovers babies, love and ice cream, Patty Jenkins is a great director, Justice League left a lot to be desired, Wonder Woman was really exciting, Gal Gadoooot, Gal Gadot!

9. Diana's made of clay just like a dreidel, Antiope's her aunt who didn't make it, David Thewlis is obviously the villain, Steve Trevor brought war to Themyscira, Diana leaves her mom to go to London, she discovers babies, love and ice cream, Patty Jenkins is a great director, Justice League left a lot to be desired, Wonder Woman was really exciting, Gal Gadoooot, Gal Gadot!

10. Amazons are warriors on an island, Diana's made of clay just like a dreidel, Antiope's her aunt who didn't make it, David Thewlis is obviously the villain, Steve Trevor brought war to Themyscira, Diana leaves her mom to go to London, she discovers babies, love and ice cream, Patty Jenkins is a great director, Justice League left a lot to be desired, Wonder Woman was really exciting, Gal Gadoooot, Gal Gadot!

11. Themyscira is a place of power, Amazons are warriors on an island, Diana's made of clay just like a dreidel, Antiope's her aunt who didn't make it, David Thewlis is obviously the villain, Steve Trevor brought war to Themyscira, Diana leaves her mom to go to London, she discovers babies, love and ice cream, Patty Jenkins is a great director, Justice League left a lot to be desired, Wonder Woman was really exciting, Gal Gadoooot, Gal Gadot!!!

Songs

Do you hear the people sing?
Singing the songs of angry men?
It is the music of the people
Who will not be slaves again!
When the beating of your heart
Echoes the beating of the drums
There is a life about to start
When tomorrow comes!

Will you join in our campaign?
Who will be strong and stand with me?
Somewhere beyond the barricade
Is there a world you long to see?

Then join in the fight
That will give you the right to be free!

Do you hear the people sing?
Singing the songs of angry men?
It is the music of the people

Who will not be slaves again!
When the beating of your heart
Echoes the beating of the drums
There is a life about to start
When tomorrow comes!

Songs

Kol ha’olam kulo gesher tzar me’od, gesher tzar me’od, gesher tzar me’od. Kol ha’olam kulo gesher tzar me’od, gesher tzar me’od. V’ha’ikar v’ha’ikar, lo lifakeid, lo lifakeid klal. V’ha’ikar, v’ha’ikar, lo lifakeid klal.

The whole world is a very narrow bridge. The important thing is not to be afraid.

Songs

to the tune of “Be Our Guest”

Be our guest! Be our guest!

Put our seder to the test!
All you have to do is come on in

And we’ll provide the rest.

Here’s some wine in a cup!

Just recline and drink it up!
It will be your favorite flavor
If it’s Concord grape you favor!

Life is sweet! Life is good!
When you’re in our neighborhood!

And when you are here,
Elijah, we are blessed!

Just park your golden chariot.
You don’t need a Marriot!
Be our guest! Be our guest! Be our guest! 

Songs

(To the tune of , of course, "Take Me Out to the Ballgame!")

Take me out to the Seder
Take me out with the crowd.
Feed me on matzah and chicken legs,
I don't care for the hard-boiled eggs.
And its root, root, root for Elijah
That he will soon reappear.
And let's hope, hope, hope that we'll meet
Once again next year!

Take me out to the Seder
Take me out with the crowd.
Read the Haggadah
And don't skip a word.
Please hold your talking,
We want to be heard.
And lets, root, root, root for the leader
That he will finish his spiel
So we can nosh, nosh, nosh and by-gosh
Let's eat the meal!!!  

Songs

[Sung to the tune of "These are a few of my favorite things"]

Cleaning and cooking and so many dishes
Out with the hametz, no pasta, no knishes
Fish that's gefillted, horseradish that stings
These are a few of our Passover things.

Matzoh and karpas and chopped up haroset
Shankbones and Kiddish and Yiddish neuroses
Tante who kvetches and uncle who sings
These are a few of our Passover things.

Motzi and maror and trouble with Pharoahs
Famines and locusts and slaves with wheelbarrows
Matzoh balls floating and eggshell that cling
These are a few of our Passover things.

When the plagues strike
When the lice bite
When we're feeling sad
We simply remember our Passover things
And then we don't feel so bad.

Songs

Passover Story (The Brady Bunch Tune)

by Mark Kreditor

It's a story, about baby Moses,

who came floating down the river called the Nile

Pharoh's Queen was there just to catch him

and so he stayed a while.

Its a story about Jewish builders

who were tired of building Pyramids.

All of them were slaves just like their Mothers

and just like their kids.

Until one day big Moses talked to Big G.

That's GOD and that spells Moses's God.

He said you just leave and go to Israel

I won't make it hard.

So then Moses asked old Pharoh let my people go.
He said: For Real, no, Moses, never, no.

So the 10 plagues were brought to Pharoh

and he said: Moses go .

Your people can go. Now Moses go.

That's the way Pharoh said now Moses go.

Songs

Just a Tad of Haroset

to the tune of “Just a spoon full of sugar”

Chorus:

Just a tad of haroset helps the bitter herbs go down,

the bitter herbs go down,

the bitter herbs go down.

Just a tad of haroset helps the bitter herbs go down,

In the most disguising way.

Oh, back in Egypt long ago,

The Jews were slaves under Pharaoh

They sweat and toiled and labored

through the day.

So when we gather Pesach night,

We do what we think right.

Maror, we chew,

To feel what they went through. (Chorus)

So after years of slavery

They saw no chance of being free.

Their suffering was the only life they knew.

But baby Moses grew up tall,

And said he’d save them all.

He did, and yet,

We swear we won’t forget.
That . . . Chorus

While the Maror is being passed,

We all refill our water glass,

Preparing for the taste that turns us red.

Although Maror seems full of minuses,

It sure does clear our sinuses.

But what’s to do?

It’s hard to be a Jew!!!

Chorus 

Songs

Sometimes I lay
Under the moon
And thank God I'm breathing
Then I pray
Don't take me soon
'Cause I am here for a reason

Sometimes in my tears I drown
But I never let it get me down
So when negativity surrounds
I know some day it'll all turn around because...

All my life I've been waiting for
I've been praying for
For the people to say
That we don't wanna fight no more
There will be no more wars
And our children will play
One day (x6)

It's not about
Win or lose
'Cause we all lose
When they feed on the souls of the innocent
Blood-drenched pavement
Keep on moving though the waters stay raging

In this maze you can lose your way (your way)
It might drive you crazy but don't let it faze you, no way (no way)

Sometimes in my tears I drown (I drown)
But I never let it get me down (get me down)
So when negativity surrounds (surrounds)
I know some day it'll all turn around because...

All my life I've been waiting for
I've been praying for
For the people to say
That we don't wanna fight no more
There will be no more wars
And our children will play
One day (x6)

One day this all will change
Treat people the same
Stop with the violence
Down with the hate

One day we'll all be free
And proud to be
Under the same sun
Singing songs of freedom like
One day (x6)

All my life I've been waiting for
I've been praying for
For the people to say
That we don't wanna fight no more
There will be no more wars
And our children will play
One day (x6)

Songs

A Whole New World

to the tune of “A Whole New World” from Aladdin

God will show us the way

To a place way out yonder.

Forty years we’ll be wandering

Until we find our dream.

God will give us the land.

God will feed us with manna.

We will see that we can escape

Our lives in Mitzrayim.

A whole new world...

Where we won’t live in slavery.

No one to tell us no,

The Jews can’t go,

Or say we’re only dreaming.

A whole new world...

A place where everyone is free.

A whole new point of view

For every Jew.

Travel to a whole new world with me

Songs

We’ll Cross the Sea

to the tune of “Under the Sea” from The Little Mermaid

You think that we all are stuck here

You think that we have no choice

We work in the sand and muck here

But what if we raise our voice?

Just trust that our God will save us

And we can run far away

Where nobody will enslave us

So come with me, don’t delay!

(Chorus)

We’ll cross the sea

We’ll cross the sea

Life will be better

They will get wetter

Than you and me

Back on this side we’ll slave away

But over there we all can play

So if you dare-o

Run from this pharaoh

We’ll cross the sea

Songs

Pharaoh

 to the tune of Adele’s “Hello”

Pharaoh, it’s me.

I was wondering if after all these

plagues, you’d set us free

To cross over, the Red Sea.

You’ve said that you’d decide to free us,

But you’ve done no freeing.

Pharaoh, can you hear me?

I’m in Egypt building pyramids with

the Jews in slavery

Who live in bondage, not free.

I have given you nine chances, this

is how it’s got to be.

There’s so much history, between us

Here in Mitzrayim.

Pharaoh won’t you let us go?

There’s one more plague I hate to show.

I’ll tell you, the worst one is still yet to come,

Our Adonai has promised to slay

your first son.

Pharaoh you have forced our hand,

There’s only so much we can stand.

I’ll tell you this Pharaoh, there’s no time to lose,

You should know that this last

plague will pass o’er the Jews, that’s

for sure.

Pharaoh, we’re fleeing.

We’ve gone biblical and packed up

all our things in such a hurry.

No time to bake bread.

We will eat our dough unleavened,

forming Matzah sheets instead.

It’s no secret, that all the Jews

Are crossing the Red Sea.

So now we’re on the other side,

We’ve made it safely to Sinai,

I’ll tell you, we’re free now to sing

out G-d’s praise,

Shake our timbrels, eat matzah, and

dance out our days.

Hello from the other side,

Our inner strength won’t be denied.

I’ll tell you, we’ll seek out God’s

Promised Land

Share the story and greatness of

Adonai’s plan, evermore…

Songs

Sweet Kosher Wine to the tune of “Sweet Caroline” by Neil Diamond

Adonai said, “I never will forget you.

I will make Pharaoh set you free.”

Now here we are, drinking the wine we savor

As we recall our slavery.

(Chorus)

Hands…pouring wine,

Reaching out, red for me, white for you.

Sweet kosher wine,

You make seders seem so good

(so good, so good, so good)

We all recline

And we drink you like we should.

Adonai said, “If you can learn to trust me

Then in the end you’ll just be fine.”

Now here we are, all of these long years later

Drinking our favorite seder wine.

(Repeat chorus)

© 2012 Barbara Sarshik

Songs

All These Jews to the tune of “All That Jazz”

Come on, babe, it’s time to say a prayer

WITH ALL THESE JEWS.

Grab some matzah, lean back in your chair

WITH ALL THESE JEWS.

Tell a story from the days of old

When our people could be bought and sold.

Just sit back and let the tale be told

WITH ALL THESE JEWS.

God said, “Moses, take a look around.

AT ALL THESE JEWS.

Go tell Pharaoh that it’s way past time

TO FREE THESE JEWS.”

God showed Moses what he had to do,

Helped the Jews tell Pharaoh “Toodleoo.”

So tonight we’re singing Dayenu

WITH ALL THESE JEWS.

©2003 Barbara Sarshik

Songs

Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses
The story of the Passover our Seder meal discloses
Reminds us that the life of slaves was not a bed of roses
Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses

Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ai
Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ai

The Jews were bound in Egypt and were feeling rather low
So Moses went to Pharaoh and said "Let my people go."
Pharaoh said "Be gone with you," which wasn't very nice
So God commenced a run of plagues including frogs and lice

Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses
The story of the Passover our Seder meal discloses
We will eat gefilte fish, though some will hold their noses
Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses

Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ai
Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ai

The plagues were unrelenting and included hail and boils
Not to mention dreadful fates for Egypt's boys and goils
Pharaoh he surrendered, then with slightly soggy feet
The Jews walked to their freedom and that's it, come on, let's eat

Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses
The story of the Passover our Seder meal discloses
Finish the Haggadah before anybody dozes
Super-kosher Manischewitz, Exodus and Moses

Songs

Hey Jews, don't make it bad

Take a sad song and make it better

Remember to let her into your heart

Then you can start to make it better

Hey Jews, don't be afraid

You were made to go out and get her

The minute you let her under your skin

Then you begin to make it better

And anytime you feel the pain, hey Jews, refrain

Don't carry the world upon your shoulders

For well you know that it's a fool who plays it cool

By making his world a little colder

Nah nah nah nah nah nah nah nah nah

Hey Jews, don't let me down

You have found her, now go and get her

Remember to let her into your heart

Then you can start to make it better

So let it out and let it in, hey Jews, begin

You're waiting for someone to perform with

And don't you know that it's just you, hey Jews, you'll do

The movement you need is on your shoulder

Nah nah nah nah nah nah nah nah nah yeah

Hey Jews, don't make it bad

Take a sad song and make it better

Remember to let her under your skin

Then you'll begin to make it

Better better better better better better, oh

Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jews

Songs



Take me out to the Seder
 Take me out with the crowd.
 Feed me on matzah and chicken legs,
 I don't care for the hard-boiled eggs.
 And its root, root, root for Elijah
 That he will soon reappear.
 And let's hope, hope, hope that we'll meet
 Once again next year!

 Take me out to the Seder
 Take me out with the crowd.
 Read the Haggadah
 And don't skip a word.
 Please hold your talking,
 We want to be heard.
 And lets, root, root, root for the leader
 That he will finish his spiel
 So we can nosh, nosh, nosh and by-gosh
 Let's eat the meal!!!

Songs

~ To the tune of “My Favorite Things”

Dry angel cakes that taste nearly not quite right

Canned macaroons looking good in the right light

Breads which don’t rise and about which we sing

These are a few of our unleavened things

Moon-shaped and jellied, those candies turn real hard

The taste of the cereal, like the boxes we discard

Matzah ball soup, to our stomach it clings

These are a few of our unleavened things.

When the night comes and I eat tons, and I’m feeling fat

I simply remember they’re Pesadik things

And my tummy feels… more flat!

Songs

~ To the tune of “Take Me Out to the Ball Game”

Take us out of Egypt,

Free us from slavery

Bake us some matzah in a haste

Don’t worry about flavor

Give no thought to taste

For it’s rush, rush, rush to the Red Sea

If we don’t cross it’s a shame

For it’s 10 plagues down and you’re out

At the Pesach game!

Songs
Source : The Times They Are A-Changin' lyrics © Bob Dylan Music Co.

The Times They Are A-Changin'

Come gather around people
Wherever you roam
And admit that the waters
Around you have grown
And accept it that soon
You'll be drenched to the bone
And if your breath to you is worth saving
Then you better start swimming or you'll sink like a stone
For the times they are a-changing

Come writers and critics
Who prophesize with your pen
And keep your eyes wide
The chance won't come again
And don't speak too soon
For the wheel's still in spin
And there's no telling who that it's naming
For the loser now will be later to win
Cause the times they are a-changing

Come senators, congressmen
Please heed the call
Don't stand in the doorway
Don't block up the hall
For he that gets hurt
Will be he who has stalled
There's the battle outside raging
It'll soon shake your windows and rattle your walls
For the times they are a-changing

Come mothers and fathers
Throughout the land
And don't criticize
What you can't understand
Your sons and your daughters
Are beyond your command
Your old road is rapidly aging
Please get out of the new one if you can't lend your hand
Cause the times they are a-changing

The line it is drawn
The curse it is cast
The slowest now
Will later be fast
As the present now
Will later be past
The order is rapidly fading
And the first one now will later be last
Cause the times they are a-changing

Songwriters: Bob Dylan

Songs

OH LISTEN, OH LISTEN!

O listen, O listen, O listen King Pharaoh

King Pharaoh, King Pharaoh, please let mypeople go.

They work so hard all day

They do not want to stay

King Pharaoh, King Pharaoh, what do you say?

NO! NO! NO! I WILL NOT LET THEM GO!

NO! NO! NO! I WILL NOT LET THEM GO!

Songs

To the tune of “Shake It Off” by Taylor Swift:

I stay up too late
Got 4 cups on my brain
That’s what people say, nuu-nuuu
That’s what people say, nuu-nuuu

I go on too many rants
But I can’t make any sense
At least that’s what people say, nuu nuuu
That’s what people say, nuu nuuu

But I keep leaning
Can’t stop, won’t stop eating
It’s like I got this freedom
In my mind
Singing, “Dayenu all night.”

‘Cause the seder’s on a plate, plate, plate, plate, plate
Mitzrim gonna hate, hate, hate, hate, hate
Marror, just gonna shake, shake, shake, shake, shake
I shake it off, Shake Marror off

Afikomen gonna break, break, break, break, break
And the matzahs gonna bake, bake, bake, bake, bake
Marror just gonna shake, shake, shake, shake, shake
I shake marror off, I shake it off

I never miss a step
Leaving Egypt was a Shlep
And that’s what they don’t see, mmm-mmm
That’s what they don’t see, mmm-mmm

I’m kiddushing on my own (kiddushing on my own)
I make the rules up as I go (rules up as I go)
And that’s what they don’t know, oy vey
That’s what they don’t know,oy vey

But I keep Leaning
Can’t stop, won’t stop dipping
It’s like I got this freedom
In my mind
Singing, “Dayenu, all night.”
‘Cause the seder’s on a plate, plate, plate, plate, plate
Mitzrim gonna hate, hate, hate, hate, hate
Marror, just gonna shake, shake, shake, shake, shake
I shake it off, I shake Marror off (Oy, Oy)
Afikomen gonna break, break, break, break, break
And the matzahs gonna bake, bake, bake, bake, bake
Marror just gonna shake, shake, shake, shake, shake
I shake marror off, I shake Marror off
Shake Marror off, I shake it off, (marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off,(marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off,(marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off(marror)

Hey, hey, hey
Just think while you’ve been leaning down and out about the Pharoah and the dirty, dirty plagues of the world,
You could’ve been getting down to this sick vort.

My afikoman lost by my new girlfriend
She’s like “Oh, my god!” but I’m just gonna break.
And to the fella over there with the Elijah good hair
Won’t you lean on over, baby? We can shake, shake, shake

Yeah ohhh

‘Cause the seder’s on a plate, plate, plate, plate, plate
Mitzrim gonna hate, hate, hate, hate, hate
Marror, just gonna shake, shake, shake, shake, shake
I shake it off, I shake it off (Oy, Oy)
Afikomen gonna break, break, break, break, break
And the matzahs gonna bake, bake, bake, bake, bake
Marror just gonna shake, shake, shake, shake, shake
I shake marror off, I shake it off (marror)

Shake Marror off, I shake it off,
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off, (marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off, (marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off (marror)

Shake Marror off, I shake it off,
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off,(marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off,(marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off(marror)

Shake Marror off, I shake it off,
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off (you’ve got to),
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off, (marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off(marror)

- See more at: http://www.bangitout.com/seder-songs-2015-shake-marror-off/#sthash.rN7RGqnI.dpuf

Songs
https://www.youtube.com/embed/OFGgbT_VasI

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Songs
Source : http://www.mysongbook.de/msb/songs/i/ifihhamm.html

If I Had A Hammer

(Pete Seeger / Lee Hays)

If I had a hammer I'd hammer in the morning
I'd hammer in the evening all over this land
I'd hammer out danger, I'd hammer out warning
I'd hammer out love between my brothers and my sisters
All over this land

If I had a bell I'd ring it in the morning
I'd ring it in the evening all over this land
I'd ring our danger, I'd ring out warning
I'd ring out love between my brothers and my sisters
All over this land

If I had a song I'd sing it in the morning
I'd sing it in the evening all over this land
I'd sing out danger, I'd sing out warning
I'd sing out love between my sisters and my brothers
All over this land

When I've got a hammer, and I've got a bell
And I've got a song to sing all over this land
It's a hammer of justice, it's a bell of freedom
It's a song about love between my brothers and my sisters
All over this land

Songs

We Say a Little Prayer to You
to the tune of “I Say a Little Prayer For You”

Tonight we are dining.
All of us are reclining.
We say a little prayer to You.

Tonight we are focused
On boils and lice and locusts.
We say a little prayer to You.

(Chorus) Forever and ever
We’ll join on this night
and we will love You.
Together, forever
we’ll sing of Your might.
Oh, how we’ll love You.
Forever and ever
That’s how it must be
Because without You
None of us here would be free!

While children are roamin’
In search of the Afikomen,
We say a little prayer to You.

You gave us l’chaim
Bringing us from Mitzrayim.
We say a little prayer to You.

(Repeat Chorus)

©2000 Barbara Sarshik 

Songs

Mighty Moses

(Sung to "Davy Crocket")

Found by the princess on the shores of the Nile

Brought up Egyptian for a little while

Always remembered that he was a Jew

And to his people, he was always true.

Moses, Mighty Moses!

Leader of the Jewish pioneers.

Came before Pharaoh, many years ago

Said to him, "Pharaoh let my people go!"

For if you don't your people will suffer

And day by day, it's gonna get tougher

Moses, Mighty Moses!

Leader of the Jewish pioneers.

Into the wilderness from Egypt of old,

Came mighty Moses, so brave and so bold.

With outstretched arm and a wave of his hand,

He parted the sea and crossed on dry land.

Moses, Mighty Moses!

Leader of the Jewish pioneers.

He led them on for forty long years,

He bound their wounds and dried their tears

He gave them manna from the Lord's own hand

And pointed the way to the promised land

Moses, Mighty Moses!

Leader of the Jewish pioneers.

Up Mount Sinai Moses did climb,

Left his people for Aaron to mind;

He was not afraid though the thunder did roar

And brought back the commandments  forevermore.

Moses, Mighty Moses!

Leader of the Jewish pioneers.

Songs
Source : Original lyrics by Eliana Light, set to tune of BaShanah Haba'ah

This page includes a video of Eliana Lights singing her "Ba Shanah HaZeh" song (and a pdf of the lyrics) focusing on the issue of child labor in the cocoa fields.  She set it to the tune of Ba Shanah HaBa'ah "because of its hopeful message of a better, more peaceful tomorrow.”  The song was submitted and won first place in Fair Trade Judaica's Passover Seder Song Lyrics Writing contest.

Songs

Take Us Out of Mitzrayim (Sung to the tune of "Take Me Out to the Ball Game")

Take us out of Mitzrayim,

Free us from slavery

Bake us some matzah in a haste

Don't worry 'bout flavor,

Give no thought to taste.

Oh it's rush, rush, rush, to the Red Sea

If we don't cross it's a shame,

For it's ten plagues,

Down and you're out

At the Pesah history game

Songs

Who knows one?

I know one.

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows two?

I know two.

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows two?

I know two.

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows four?

I know four.

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows five?

I know five.

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows six?

I know six.

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows seven?

I know seven.

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows eight?

I know eight.

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows nine?

I know nine.

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows ten?

I know ten.

Ten are the Words from Sinai

Nine are the months of childbirth

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows eleven?

I know eleven.

Eleven are the stars

Ten are the Words from Sinai

Nine are the months of childbirth

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows twelve?

I know twelve.

Twelve are the tribes

Eleven are the stars

Ten are the Words from Sinai

Nine are the months of childbirth

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows thirteen?

I know thirteen

Thirteen are the attributes of God

Twelve are the tribes

Eleven are the stars

Ten are the Words from Sinai

Nine are the months of childbirth

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Songs


Eight Days? A Week?
(to the tune of “Eight Days a Week”)
(Just how long is Passover, anyway?)


Ooh, I need my bread, babe Guess you know it’s true. How long must I wait, babe? What’s your point of view?


Bagels, challah! Bagels, challah! I ain’t got nothing but matzah Eight days? A week?


Some Jews say it’s seven. Some Jews say it’s eight. Just how long is Pesach? How long must I wait?


Bagels, challah! Bagels, challah! I ain’t got nothing but matzah Eight days? A week?

Eight days? A week? Of Peeeeeeeeeeeeesach.
Eight days? A week? It’s long enough to show we care.


Ooh, I need my bread, babe Guess you know it’s true. How long must I wait, babe? What’s your point of view?


Bagels, challah! Bagels, challah! I ain’t got nothing but matzah Eight days? A week?
© 2012 Barbara Sarshik and Leah Pike

Songs

Uptown Funk  Pesach Style

Songs
Source : John Lennon

Imagine there's no heaven
It's easy if you try
No hell below us
Above us only sky
Imagine all the people living for today

Imagine there's no countries
It isn't hard to do
Nothing to kill or die for
And no religion too
Imagine all the people living life in peace, you

You may say I'm a dreamer
But I'm not the only one
I hope some day you'll join us
And the world will be as one

Imagine no possessions
I wonder if you can
No need for greed or hunger
A brotherhood of man
Imagine all the people sharing all the world, you

You may say I'm a dreamer
But I'm not the only one
I hope some day you'll join us
And the world will be as one

Songs

If I Had a Hammer / Pete Seeger

If I had a hammer
I'd hammer in the morning
I'd hammer in the evening
All over this land
I'd hammer out danger
I'd hammer out a warning
I'd hammer out love between my brothers and my sisters
All over this land

If I had a bell
I'd ring it in the morning
I'd ring it in the evening
All over this land
I'd ring out danger
I'd ring out a warning
I'd ring out love between my brothers and my sisters
All over this land

If I had a song
I'd sing it in the morning
I'd sing it in the evening
All over this land
I'd sing out danger
I'd sing out a warning
I'd sing out love between my brothers and my sisters
All over this land

Well I've got a hammer
And I've got a bell
And I've got a song to sing
All over this land
It's the hammer of justice
It's the bell of freedom
It's the song about love between my brothers and my sisters
All over this land

Blowin' In the Wind / Bob Dylan

How many roads must a man walk down
Before you call him a man?
How many seas must a white dove sail
Before she sleeps in the sand?
Yes, 'n' how many times must the cannon balls fly
Before they're forever banned?
The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind
The answer is blowin' in the wind

Yes, 'n' how many years can a mountain exist
Before it's washed to the sea?
Yes, 'n' how many years can some people exist
Before they're allowed to be free?
Yes, 'n' how many times can a man turn his head
And pretend that he just doesn't see?
The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind
The answer is blowin' in the wind

Yes, 'n' how many times must a man look up
Before he can see the sky?
Yes, 'n' how many ears must one man have
Before he can hear people cry?
Yes, 'n' how many deaths will it take till he knows
That too many people have died?
The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind
The answer is blowin' in the wind

We Shall Overcome / Pete Seeger

We shall overcome,
We shall overcome,
We shall overcome, some day.

Oh, deep in my heart,
I do believe
We shall overcome, some day.

We'll walk hand in hand,
We'll walk hand in hand,
We'll walk hand in hand, some day.

Oh, deep in my heart,

We shall live in peace,
We shall live in peace,
We shall live in peace, some day.

Oh, deep in my heart,

We shall all be free,
We shall all be free,
We shall all be free, some day.

Oh, deep in my heart,

We are not afraid,
We are not afraid,
We are not afraid, TODAY

Oh, deep in my heart,

We shall overcome,
We shall overcome,
We shall overcome, some day.

Oh, deep in my heart,
I do believe
We shall overcome, some day.

Songs
Source : Unknown

(Sung to the tune of "My Favorite Things" from The Sound of Music)

cleaning and cooking and so many dishes

out with the hametz no pasta no knishes

fish thats gefillted horseradish that stings

these are a few off our passover things.

 Chorus:

matzah and karpas and chopped up haroset

shankbones and kiddish and yiddish neuroses

tante who kvetches and uncle who sings

these are a few off our passover things.

Chorus:

matzi and marror and trouble with pharahs

famines and locusts and slaves with wheelbaarrows

matzah balls floating and eggshell that clings

these are a few off our passover things.

Chorus:

when the plagues strike

when the lice bite

when were feeling sad

we simply remember our passover things

and then we dont feel so bad.

Songs

Free to Be You and Me               by  The New Seekers

There's a land that I see where the children are free
And I say it ain't far to this land from where we are
Take my hand, come with me, where the children are free
Come with me, take my hand, and we'll live

In a land where the river runs free
In a land through the green country
In a land to a shining sea
And you and me are free to be you and me

I see a land bright and clear, and the time's comin' near
When we'll live in this land, you and me, hand in hand
Take my hand, come along, lend your voice to my song
Come along, take my hand, sing a song

For a land where the river runs free
For a land through the green country
For a land to a shining sea
For a land where the horses run free
And you and me are free to be you and me

Every boy in this land grows to be his own man
In this land, every girl grows to be her own woman
Take my hand, come with me where the children are free
Come with me, take my hand, and we'll run

To a land where the river runs free
To a land through the green country
To a land to a shining sea
To a land where the horses run free
To a land where the children are free
And you and me are free to be
And you and me are free to be
And you and me are free to be you and me

4.2

Songs
Source : http://www.jewishmag.com/jimmenu/passover.htm

The night of Pesach


By Michael Druck © 1992


It was the night of Pesach 
And all through the house 
You couldn't find bread 
In anyone's mouth 
The table was set with karpas and fish 
And maror and wine 
And potato knish 
With Daddy and Mommy 
And poor Uncle Lou 
Grandma and Grandpa 
And Sammy and Sue 
A place was set where nobody sat 
For Elijah the Prophet and a cup that was fat 
With wine and cheer 
For all that came by 
To see our set table 
And thank G-d with a sigh 
How lucky we were to be all at home 
And none of us should feel ever left all alone


First we made kiddush 
Then the washing of hands 
Karpas is next 
Passed 'round the table to Sam 
Dividing the matzoh and telling the tale 
Of the Jews leaving Egypt for Israel 
We passed the maror 
And ate our fish 
And hid the matzoh away with a dish 
And Grandpa stood up and said with a tear 
"We should all be together for Pesach next year!" 
Have a wonderful Pesach 
With joy in your home 
And from me to you 
I will say a SHALOM! 

Songs

Moses Island
(Sung to the tune of Gilligan's Island)

Just recline right back and you'll hear a tale,
a tale of dreadful trip.
That started with ten awful plagues brought onto Egypt,
brought unto Egypt.

The boss he was a Jewish man raised as a Pharaohs son.
Then G-d he did come calling and soon the fun begun,
soon the fun begun.

More blood, such frogs, and all those bugs,
Pharaoh could just barely see.
The Jews were really scoring points and soon they would be free.
and soon they would be free.

They shlepped and shlepped for forty years across a desert land.
He went up to Mt Sinai and a party soon began,
a party soon began.

Moses, the Pharaoh too, Aaron and his wife.
Marianne the skipper too here
on the desert island. 

GreyDivider.jpg

Songs
Source : various

to the tune of “Hey Jude”

Hey, Jews, don’t be afraid.

You were made to Escape Mitzrayim.

In Sinai, the Lord will help you to live

And He will give you all some mayim.

Hey, Jews, it’s time to start.

God will part all The Red Sea waters.

Remember, pack matzah and be real brave.

God’s gonna save your sons and daughters.

The Lord will free you from your pain,

The whip, the chain. Have faith,

and you’ll all be happy later.

Hey, Jews, your tales from days of old will all be told

By all your descendants at their seder.

Da da da da da Da da da da.

Hey, Jews, don’t be afraid.

You were made to

Escape Mitzrayim. I

n Sinai, the Lord will help you to live

And He will give you all some mayim

Mayim, mayim, mayim, mayim, mayim, mayim, wooow!

Da da da da da da da Da da da da

Hey, Jews

Etc.

Songs
Source : Gary Teblum

Beatles Passover Songs

 


He Freed Us

(Sung to the tune of “She Loves You”)

by Gary Teblum

 

He freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah

He freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah

He freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah

 

You think you’re not so free

Well, it was so yesterday-yi-yay

It’s just like you were there

And he told us what to say-yi-yay

 

You know he freed us,

and you know that can’t be bad

Oh yes, he freed us,

and you know we should be glad

 

God said you must act so

As if you were there too

And then God says you’ll know

How we maintain the glue

 

You know he freed us,

and you know that can’t be bad

Oh yes, he freed us,

and you know we should be glad

 

Oh, he freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah

He freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah

 

With a God like that

You know we should be glad

 

You know he freed the Jews

He brought us from that land

As if you were there too

Grab on to his hand

 

You know he freed us,

and you know that can’t be bad

Oh yes, he freed us,

and you know we should be glad

Oo, he freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah

He freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah

 

And with a god like that

You know we should . . . be glad

Yeah, Yeah, Yeah

Yeah, Yeah, Yeah, Yeahhhhh.

----------------------------------------

All My Leaven

(Sung to the tune of “All My Lovin”)

by Gary Teblum

 

Search my house and I’ll find it

Tomorrow I’ll miss it

The feather will help me be true

And a candle as well

Means that then I can sell

And I’ll sell all my leaven to you

 

I’ll find crumbs in the kitchen

The kinder will pitch in

I’ll try not to leave any clue

And then while its away

I’ll eat matzah each day

‘cause I sold all my leaven to you

 

All my leaven, I will sell to you

All my leaven, Rabbi, I’ll be true

 

I’ll find crumbs in the kitchen

The kinder will pitch in

I’ll try not to leave any clue

 

And then while its away

I’ll eat matzah each day

‘cause I sold all my leaven to you

 

All my leaven, I will sell to you

All my leaven, Rabbi, I’ll be true

All my leaven, All my leaven

Woo, all my leaven, I will sell to you

----------------------------------------

 

 

 

Hey, Frogs

(sung to the tune of “Hey Jude”)

by Gary Teblum

 

Hey frogs, please go away

You’re a bad plague that gets no better

Miztrayim is suffering from this plague

If I relent, will it get better?

 

Hey frogs, I’m now afraid

You were put here to make us suffer

Your jumping is getting under my skin

Now I need Moshe to make it better

 

And all the time I feel the pain

Hey frogs refrain

Don’t infest my world and all our households

For well you know, I’d be a fool to play it cool

By keeping the Jews a little longer

Na na na na na na na na na

 

Hey frogs, don’t jump around

Yet when you leave, I’ll get bad weather

Miztrayim is suffering from this plague

If I relent, will it get better?

 

So get on out and get me in

Hey frogs, you win

I’m telling Moshe to take his people

And don't you know that it’s just you

Hey frogs, it’s true

You’re jumping around about my shoulder

Na na na na na na na na na yeah

 

Hey frogs, please go away

You’re a bad plague that gets no better

Miztrayim is suffering from this plague

If I relent, will it get better?

Better, better, better, better, better,

oh Na, na na na na na na na na na na,

hey frogs

Na, na na na na na na na na na na,

hey frogs

Songs
Source : various

to the tune of “All That Jazz”

Come on, babe, it’s time to say a prayer

WITH ALL THESE JEWS.

Grab some matzah, lean back in your chair

WITH ALL THESE JEWS.

Tell a story from the days of old

When our people could be bought and sold.

Just sit back and let the tale be told

WITH ALL THESE JEWS.

God said, “Moses, take a look around.

AT ALL THESE JEWS.

Go tell Pharaoh that it’s way past time

TO FREE THESE JEWS.”

God showed Moses what he had to do,

Helped the Jews tell Pharaoh “Toodleoo.”

So tonight we’re singing Dayenu

WITH ALL

THESE

JEWS.

Songs
Source : me

Master of the Jews to the tune of “Master of the House” from Les Miserables

(sung by the Hebrews)

Master of the Jews, giving us a push.

Sure that God is hiding in a burning bush.

Here another frog, there a little lice.

Thinking Pharaoh’s gonna follow his advice.

If we do as Moses tells us, all of us will surely lose.

Heading to disaster following the Master of the Jews.

Water from a stone, manna from the sky.

Everything he promises is just a lie.

We will all be lost. It will be a mess

Wandering the desert without G.P.S.

Can’t you see the front page headlines? We’ll be on the late night news.

Meeting with disaster following the Master of the Jews.

(sung by the Pharaoh’s daughter)

I used to dream that I would raise a prince,

But gods almighty, have you seen what happened since?

Master of the Jews — just a rotten kid!

Can’t he see we need another pyramid?

Foolish little man, doesn’t Moses know

Pharaoh’s never gonna let the Hebrews go.

What a cruel trick of nature! This is not the son I’d choose.

Once a Hebrew bastard, now he is the Master of the Jews.

(sung by the Hebrews)

Master of the Jews — isn’t that a laugh?

We’d be better worshiping a golden calf.

Telling us to pack, telling us to flee,

Promising that God will end our slavery.

Holding out the hope of freedom, saying that it’s ours to choose.

Heading to disaster quick — Hey, don’t the Pharaoh’s cows look sick? –

Heading to disaster following the Master of the Jews.

 
Songs
Source : me

Hey There Elijah (tune of Plain White T's "Hey There Delilah") 
by Barry Kling (Scansion adjustments by Randi & Murray Spiegel), Passover 2008/2009
                                Sing it yourself:   Low fi karaoke accompanyment 

Hey there Elijah
What's it like at all those Seders
You will drink a lot of wine tonight
But tonight you're permitted yes you are
We can't continue without you,
Oh yes it's true

Hey there Elijah
We believe you'll be here someday
And will bring the world together
Give us hope for what the future will provide
Hear our prayers and our cries,
You're by our side

Chorus: Oh it's what you mean to us (4 times)
What you mean to us.

Hey there Elijah
Share your vision of the world to be
Where G-d is one for everyone
And Seders 'round the world are being done
Next year may we all celebrate,
In Jerusalem

Hey there Elijah
With our friends and fam'ly gathered here
Just as they do year after year
Now we have only one task left to do,
You know it's all because of you,
We open our door to welcome you,
Hey there Elijah, here's to you,
This cup's for you

Repeat Chorus

Songs
Source : Foundation for Family Education, Inc.

(to the tune of "Just a spoon full of sugar")  

Chorus:

Just a tad of charoset helps the bitter herbs go down,

The bitter herbs go down, the bitter herbs go down.

Just a tad of charoset helps the bitter herbs go down, In the most disguising way.  

Oh, back in Egypt long ago,

The Jews were slaves under Pharaoh.

They sweat and toiled and labored through the day.

So when we gather Pesach night,

We do what we think right.

Maror, we chew,

To feel what they went through.  

Chorus  

So after years of slavery

They saw no chance of being free.

Their suffering was the only life they knew.

But baby Moses grew up tall,

And said he'd save them all.

He did, and yet,

We swear we won't forget.

That......  

Chorus cont….  

While the maror is being passed,

We all refill our water glass,

Preparing for the taste that turns us red.

Although maror seems full of minuses,

It sure does clear our sinuses.

But what's to do?

It's hard to be a Jew!!!  

Chorus

Songs
Source : me

A Whole New World

to the tune of “A Whole New World”

God will show us the way 

To a place way out yonder. 

Forty years we’ll be wandering 

Until we find our dream.

God will give us the land. 

God will feed us with manna. 

We will see that we can escape 

Our lives in Mitzrayim.

A whole new world… 

Where we won’t live in slavery. 

No one to tell us no, 

The Jews can’t go, 

Or say we’re only dreaming.

A whole new world… 

A place where everyone is free. 

A whole new point of view 

For every Jew. 

Travel to a whole new world with me.

Songs
Source : Foundation for Family Education, Inc.

(To the tune of "Tonight," from West Side Story, By Rabbi Dan Liben Passover, 2000)

 
Tonight, tonight,
We'll tell a tale tonight,
Of Pharoah, Slaves and God's awesome might;
We'll do it right, with matzah,  and maror
and four children: -dull, wicked- and bright!
Tonight, we'll tell our people's story,
The "genut" and then the glory,
And how it came out right..
And when we're through
You'll know you've been freed too
On this Saaay-der night!
Tonight, tonight, we'll drink four cups of wine,
We'll laugh and sing and dine
'till its light;
The tale's not new
And yet it still rings true
It gives meaning -to being -a Jew!
Egyptian masters they did beat us
But Moses he did lead us
From darkness into light;
And soon we'll know
Why God did make it so
On this Saaaay-der night!
Songs
Source : Foundation for Family Education, Inc.
(To the tune of 'The Twelve Days”)
 
On the first night of Passover my mother served to me
1)  a matzo ball in chicken soup
2)  two dipped herbs
3)  three pieces of matzah
4)  four cups of wine
5)  five gefilte fish
6)  six capons baking
7)  seven eggs a boiling
8)  eight briskets roastin
Songs
Source : Foundation for Family Education, Inc.

(Mark Kreditor, sung to the tune of The Brady Bunch)  

It's a story, about baby Moses, who came floating down the river called the Nile

Pharoh's Queen was there just to catch him and so he stayed a while.

It's a story about Jewish builders, who were tired of building Pyramids.

All of them were slaves just like their Mothers and just like their kids.

Until one day big Moses talked to Big G.

That's G-O-D and that spells Moses's God.

He said you just leave and go to Israel I won't make it hard.

So then Moses asked old Pharoh let my people go.

He said "For Real"!, no Moses never no.

So the 10 plagues were brought to Pharoh and he said: Moses go. 

Your people can go. Now Moses go.

That's the way Pharoh said now Moses go.

Songs
by BBYO
Source : Matisyahu

Sometimes I lay
Under the moon
And thank God I'm breathing
Then I pray
Don't take me soon
'Cause I am here for a reason

Sometimes in my tears I drown
But I never let it get me down
So when negativity surrounds
I know some day it'll all turn around because...

All my life I've been waiting for
I've been praying for
For the people to say
That we don't wanna fight no more
There will be no more wars
And our children will play
One day (x6)

It's not about
Win or lose
'Cause we all lose
When they feed on the souls of the innocent
Blood-drenched pavement
Keep on moving though the waters stay raging

In this maze you can lose your way (your way)
It might drive you crazy but don't let it faze you, no way (no way)

Sometimes in my tears I drown (I drown)
But I never let it get me down (get me down)
So when negativity surrounds (surrounds)
I know some day it'll all turn around because...

All my life I've been waiting for
I've been praying for
For the people to say
That we don't wanna fight no more
There will be no more wars
And our children will play
One day (x6)

One day this all will change
Treat people the same
Stop with the violence
Down with the hate

One day we'll all be free
And proud to be
Under the same sun
Singing songs of freedom like
One day (x6)

All my life I've been waiting for
I've been praying for
For the people to say
That we don't wanna fight no more
There will be no more wars
And our children will play
One day (x6)

Songs

Sweet Kosher Wine (to the tune of “Sweet Caroline”)

Adonai said, “I never will forget you.

I will make Pharaoh set you free.” Now here we are, drinking the wine we savor

As we recall our slavery.

(Chorus)

Hands…pouring wine,

Reaching out, red for me, white for you.

Sweet kosher wine,

You make seders seem so good (so good, so good, so good)

We all recline

And we drink you like we should.

Adonai said, “If you can learn to trust me

Then in the end you’ll just be fine.”

Now here we are, all of these long years later

Drinking our favorite seder wine.

(Repeat chorus)

Songs
Source : Foundation For Family Education, Inc.

(By the Bohnen family, “That’s Amore,”)

It is round and it’s dull
And has no taste at all--
Matzah Shmurah!
It is guarded while stored
And it tastes like cardboard--
Matzah Shmurah!
It is watched
From the day it’s sown
Water’s not allowed
Or it’s thrown out the door-a!
It’s commanded by God
And it comes from Chabad--
Matzah Shmurah!
 

Songs

Bashana haba'a
Neishev al hamirpeset
Ve'nispor tziporim nodedot,

Yeladim bechufsha
Yesachak'u tofeset
Bein habayit l've'in hasadot 

Od tireh, od tireh
Kama tov yihiyeh
Bashana, bashana haba'a

Anavim adumim
Yavshilu ad ha'erev
Ve'yugshu tzone'nim lashulchan,

Ve'ruchot redumim
Yis'u al em haderech
Itonim yeshanim v'anan.

Od tir eh, od tir eh,

Bashana haba'a
Nifros kapot yadayim
Mul ha'or hanigar halavan,

Anafa levana
Tifros ka'or k'nafayim
V'hashemesh tizrach b'tochan.

Od tir eh, od tir eh, 

Next year we will sit on the porch and count migrating birds.
Children on vacation will play catch between the house and the fields.

You will yet see, you will yet see, how good it will be next year.

Red grapes will ripen till the evening, and will be served chilled to the table.
And languid winds will carry to the crossroads old newspapers and a cloud. 

You will yet see, you will yet see, how good it will be next year.

Next year we will spread out our hands towards the radiant light.
A white heron like a light will spread her wings and within then the sun will rise.

You will yet see, you will yet see, how good it will be next year.

Songs

Mama, someone broke my heart again
Tell her I don't think I can take it anymore
Mama, someone broke my heart again
Now I'm gonna ease my pain, 
Dancing on the floor

Take me out, 
I'm not in the mood for a broken heart
Gonna dance tonight, forget her
No, she doesn’t know 
What I'm doing on the floor
Did you say hello, my ladies?

Pull me baby, I'm your trigger
You know that my love is bigger
Love, Love, Love 
Let the rhythm take us higher 
You know when I'm on fire
Check me out (3-2-1- hey!)

I'm a golden boy
Come here to enjoy
I'm the king of fun
Let me show you how we do it
I'm a golden boy
Come here to enjoy
And before I leave
Let me show you Tel Aviv

Hold me tight, 
We're not going home tonight 
Oh yeah, do you like my dancing? 
Pull me baby, I'm your trigger
You know that my love is bigger
Check me out (3-2-1- hey!)

I'm a golden boy
Come here to enjoy
I'm the king of fun
Let me show you how we do it
I'm a golden boy
Come here to enjoy
And before I leave
Let me show you Tel Aviv

This is how we do it…

Songs
Source : www.bangitout.com

To the tune of Hotel California

On an Egyptian desert highway 

Cool wind in our hair 

Warm smell of mazohballs 

Rising up through the air. 

Up ahead in the distance 

There’s no food in sight

My head grew heavy, and my sight grew dim 

Why is this different then all other nights!?

There Elijah stood in the doorway 

I heard his dayanu song 

And I was thinking to myself 

This could be Heaven or Maagid prolonged!? 

Then I asked the 4 questions 

The hagadah taught me the way 

There were voices for each 4 sons I thought I heard them say:


Chorus 

Welcome to our Passover Seder 

Such a lovely place 

Such a lovely place (background) 

There’s no need to race! 

Plenty of room at our Passover Table 

It’s that time of year It’s that time of year (background) 

When we can’t serve Beer!

Songs
Source : www.bangitout.com

To the tune of Piano Man by Billy Joel

It's nine o'clock at the Seder Night 

The regular family members shuffle in 

There's an old man sitting next to me makin’ love to his Manishewitz yayin

He says, "Son, can you tell me bout the Exodus 

I'm not really sure how it goes

But it's sad and it's sweet and it’s got no leavened wheat 

so wake me up when we get to the matza hors’ devours 

la la la, di da da La la, di di da da yay nu

Sing us a song, it’s the Seder, man 

Sing us a song tonight 

Well, we're all in the mood for the Exodus 

And this First Cup got us all feelin' all right

Songs

Freedom, Lachaim (sung to Hava Nagila)

Freedom, L'chaim

Freedom, L'chaim

Freedom, L'chaim

Eat Matza Balls

Freedom, L'chaim

Freedom, L'chaim

Freedom, L'chaim

Eat Chopped Liver

Got to get out of the Egyptian skies

The bread we call matzoh didn't have time to rise

Angel of death passed over our door

So slaves oh slaves we are no more

So eat, eat, eat, eat, eat, eat

Suffering is what we tow

Guilt and eating's what we know

Please pass the brisket over

We don't want to have any leftovers

Celebrate, Celebrate!

Drink that Manischewitz wine!