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Introduction
by VBS
Source : VBS Haggadah
The first words in the creation of the universe out of the unformed, void and dark earth were God’s “Let there be light." Therein lies the hope and faith of Judaism and the obligation of our people: to make the light of justice, compassion, and knowledge penetrate the darkness of our time till the prophecy be fulfilled, ‘that wickedness vanish like smoke and the earth shall be filled with knowledge of God as the waters cover the sea’ (Isaiah 11:9). 

Baruch atah Adonai Elohaynoo melech ha-olam, asher keedshanoo b’meetzvotav v’tzeevanoo l’hadleek ner shel yom tov.

Praised are You, Lord our God, Whose presence fills the universe, Who has sanctified our lives through Your commandments and commanded us to kindle the festival lights. 

Baruch ata Adonai, Elohaynoo melech ha-olam, sheh’hech’eeyanoo v’keeyemanoo, v’heegeeanoo la-z’man ha-zeh.

Praised are You, Lord our God, Whose presence fills the universe, Who has given us life and strength and enabled us to reach this moment of joy. 

Introduction
Source : American Mussar

The Hebrew word for Egypt is translated as “narrow place.” Slavery in Egypt confined us to a narrow place, with constrictions on our physical, emotional, and spiritual lives. The Exodus is the story of liberation from the things that hold us back.

Rabbi Nachman of Bratzlov (1772-1822) said, “The Exodus from Egypt occurs in every human being, in every era, in every year, and in every day.” I admit it – the quote gives me chills. What an amazing opportunity we have every day – to liberate ourselves from what holds us back. Each choice we make, we face is an opportunity for liberation. This raises the question: how do we liberate those who are not free to choose?

Gesher Tsar Me'od 

Kol Ha'olam kulo
Gesher Tsar me'od
Gesher Tsar me'od
Gesher Tsar me'od -

Kol Ha'olam kulo
Gesher Tsar me'od - 
Gesher Tsar me'od.

Veha'ikar - veha'ikar
Lo lefached - 
lo lefached klal.

Veha'ikar - veha'ikar
lo lefached klal.

The whole world is a very narrow bridge, 
and the most important thing is not to be afraid. 
 

Kadesh
Source : Traditional Haggadah Text

The following Seder is for a weeknight. (On Shabbat we add the words in parentheses)

רָיְהִי עֶרֶב וַיְהִי בֹקֶר יוֹם הַשִּׁשִּׁי. וַיְכֻלּוּ הַשָׁמַיִם וְהָאָרֶץ וְכָל צְבָאַָם. וַיְכַל אֱלֹקִים בַּיוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי מְלַאכְתּוֹ אֲשֶׁר עָשָׂה וַיִּשְׁבֹּת בַּיוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי מִכָּל מְלַאכְתּוֹ אֲשֶׁר עָשָׂה. וַיְבָרֶךְ אֱלֹהִים אֶת יוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי וַיְקַדֵּשׁ אוֹתוֹ כִּי בוֹ שָׁבַת מִכָּל מְלַאכְתּוֹ אֲשֶׁר בֶָּרָא אֱלֹהִים לַעֲשׂוֹת

(Vay'hi erev vay'hi voker yom hashi-shi. Vay'chulu hashamayim v'ha-aretz v’choltzva’am. Vay’chal Elohim bayom hashvi’i, m'lachto asher asah, vayishbot bayom hashvi-i, mikol-mlachto asher asah. Vay'vareich Elohim, et-yom hashvi’i, vay'kadeish oto, ki vo shavat mikol-mlachto, asher-bara Elohim la-asot.)

(“And there was evening and there was morning, the sixth day. Now the heavens and all their host were completed. And on the seventh day God finished His work of creation which He had made. And God blessed the seventh day and made it holy, for on that day God rested from His work and ceased creating.)

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָפֶן

Baruch atah Adonai, Eloheinu melech ha’olam, borei p'ri hagafen.

Praised are you, Adonai, Lord our God, Ruler of the universe, who has created the fruit of the vine.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר בָּחַר בָּנוּ מִכָּל עָם וְרוֹמְמָנוּ מִכָּל לָשׁוֹן וְקִדְּשָׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו. וַתִּתֶּן לָנוּ יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ בְּאַהֲבָה (שַׁבָּתוֹת לִמְנוּחָה וּ) מוֹעֲדִים לְשִׂמְחָה, חַגִּים וּזְמַנִּים לְשָׂשׂוֹן, אֶת יוֹם (הַשַׁבָּת הַזֶה וְאֶת יוֹם) חַג הַמַצוֹת הַזֶה, זְמַן חֵרוּתֵנוּ (בְּאַהֲבָה), מִקְרָא קֹדֶשׁ, זֵכֶר לִיצִיאַת מִצְרָיִם. כִּי בָנוּ בָחַרְתָּ וְאוֹתָנוּ קִדַּשְׁתָּ מִכָּל הָעַמִּים, (וְשַׁבָּת) וּמוֹעֲדֵי קָדְשֶךָ (בְּאַהֲבָה וּבְרָצוֹן,) בְּשִׂמְחָה וּבְשָׂשׂוֹן הִנְחַלְתָּנוּ. בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי, מְקַדֵּשׁ (הַשַׁבָּת וְ) יִשְׂרָאֵל וְהַזְּמַנִּים.

Baruch atah Adonai, Eloheinu melech ha’olam, asher bachar banu mikol’am, v'rom'manu mikol-lashon, v'kid'shanu b'mitzvotav, vatiten-lanu Adonai Eloheinu b'ahavah (shabatot limnuchah u) moadim l'simchah, chagim uz'manim l'sason et-yom (hashabat hazeh v'et-yom) chag hamatzot hazeh. Z'man cheiruteinu, (b'ahavah,) mikra kodesh, zeicher litziat mitzrayim. Ki vanu vacharta v'otanu kidashta mikol ha’amim. (v'shabat) umo’adei kod’shecha (b'ahavah uv'ratzon) b'simchah uv'sason hinchaltanu. Baruch atah Adonai, m'kadeish (h’shabbat v') Yisrael v'hazmanim.

Praised are you, Adonai, Lord our God, Ruler of the universe, Who has chosen us from among all people, and languages, and made us holy through Your mitzvot, giving us lovingly [Shabbat for rest] festivals for joy, and special times for celebration, this [Shabbat and this] Passover, this [given in love] this sacred gathering to commemorate the Exodus from Egypt. You have chosen us, You have shared Your holiness with us among all other peoples. For with [Shabbat and] festive revelations of Your holiness, happiness and joy You have granted us [lovingly] joyfully the holidays. Praised are you, Adonai, Who sanctifies [Shabbat], Israel and the festivals.

On Saturday night include the following section:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא מְאוֹרֵי הָאֵשׁ. בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם הַמַבְדִיל בֵּין קֹדֶשׁ לְחֹל, ין אוֹר לְחשֶׁךְ, בֵּין יִשְׂרָאֵל לָעַמִּים, בֵּין יוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי לְשֵׁשֶׁת יְמֵי הַמַּעֲשֶׂה. בֵּין קְדֻשַּׁת שַׁבָּת לִקְדֻשַּׁת יוֹם טוֹב הִבְדַּלְתָּ, וְאֶת יוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי מִשֵּׁשֶׁת יְמֵי הַמַּעֲשֶׂה קִדַּשְׁתָּ. הִבְדַּלְתָּ וְקִדַּשְׁתָּ אֶת עַמְּךָ יִשְׂרָאֵל בִּקְדֻשָּׁתֶךָ. ,בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי הַמַּבְדִיל בֵּין קֹדֶשׁ לְקֹדֶשׁ

( Baruch atah Adonai, Eloheinu melech ha-olam, borei m'orei ha-eish.

Baruch atah Adonai, Eloheinu melech ha’olam, hamavdil bein kodesh l'chol bein or l'choshech, bein Yisrael la-amim, bein yom hashvi-i l'sheishet y'mei hama-aseh. Bein k'dushat shabat likdushat yom tov hivdalta. V'et-yom hashvi-i misheishet y'mei hama-aseh kidashta. Hivdalta v'kidashta et-am'cha yisra-eil bikdushatecha. Baruch atah Adonai, hamavdil bein kodesh l'kodesh.)

(Praised are You Adonai our God Lord of the universe who created the lights of fire.

Praised are you, Adonai, Lord our God, Ruler of the universe, who makes a distinction between the holy and profane, light and darkness, Israel and the nations, Shabbat and the six workdays. You have made a distinction between the holiness of Shabbat and the holiness of the festival, and You have sanctified Shabbat above the six work-days. You have set apart and made holy Your people Israel with your holiness. Praised are you, Adonai, who distinguishes between degrees of sanctity.)

Say this Shehechiyanu blessing the first Seder night only:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, שֶׁהֶחֱיָנוּ וְקִיְּמָנוּ וְהִגִּיעָנוּ לַזְּמַן הַזֶה

Baruch atah Adonai, Eloheinu melech ha-olam,
she’hecheyanu v'ki'manu v'higi-anu laz'man hazeh.

Praised are you, Adonai, Lord our God, Ruler of the universe,
who has sustained us, maintained us and enabled us to reach this moment in life.

Urchatz
Source : original

By Rabbi Gavriel Goldfeder  alternadox.net

Later on we will do ' rachtzah '─the washing over the matzah . Now we are doing ' urchatz ', which amounts to washing before eating a vegetable.  This is not something we do every day.

To explain, Rabbi Abraham Isaac Kook, first chief Rabbi of the State of Israel, writes of dividing life into two categories: the goal, and everything else.  We set goals for ourselves and set out to reach them.  Everything we do that helps us reach that goal is worthwhile.  But how do we relate to all the other things we do?   This is an important question that addresses how we feel about the aspects of our lives that our not essential.  And this is one of the central points of the Seder.

What is the goal of the Seder?  The peak spiritual moment of the Seder is when we fully absorb the spiritual impact of the matzah when we eat it.  So why don't we cut to the chase?  Let's get that matzah inside of us as quickly as possible!  But the truth is, the Seder wants to help us experience every moment of our lives as an encounter with the Divine.  It demands that we let go of our usual distinctions -  important and unimportant, sacred and profane, good and bad, needs and wants.

Tonight, we are going to learn how to experience the Divine within all moments.  Not only prayers and mitzvot, but also eating and conversation.  Not only goals, but journeys.  Finally free to let go of the reins for a moment, we can celebrate every moment equally.  Not only will we recognize the holiness of the process, we will even sanctify ourselves toward this pursuit: urchatz.

R’ Kook deepens the concept for us: vegetables, in the Talmud, are thought to enhance hunger - 'appetizers'.  If eating is an unfortunate concession we make to our animal nature, then vegetables are antithetical to the goal of living life more spiritually. But if eating is another opportunity for encounter with the Divine - if pleasure is an encounter with the Divine ─ then the vegetable we are about to eat is a holy sacrament, drawing us in to a moment of Encounter.  So of course we should wash our hands to prepare ourselves.

Washing toward the matzah -goal and the vegetable-distractions represent two kinds of freedom: the first is freedom to live an intentional life.  We celebrate our right and capacity to point ourselves in a specific direction and actually follow through.  But there is another kind of freedom: freedom to let go, to know that wherever we go we will find Hashem and meaning and direction and connection. It is told that the Ba'al Shem Tov, the founder of Chassidut, when embarking on a journey, would have his coachman, Alexi, let go of the reins and sit backward, facing away from the horses. With the  freedom to let go of the reins, we allow our desires to guide us as much we allow the Torah to guide us.

Rebbe Natan of Brelsov writes that ' urchatz ' is from the root-word in Aramaic that means 'trust'.   At this moment in the Seder, pay closer attention to your capacity to trust and let go.  The goal is to trust enough to sanctify aspects of yourself and the life you live that you never allowed yourself to see as holy. Can you trust the holiness of the night, the 'night of protection', to guard you from any negative impact of what's inside of you?  Do you  trust the people around this table, each of them looking at you tonight with holy Pesach-eyes, to be with you in your search for true freedom?

We have nothing to fear except holding back. We will never reach true freedom if we do not free our desires and appetites to be in service of the Divine.

As you wash, consider that you are preparing yourself for an encounter with something holy – your own desires!  Use the washing as an opportunity to shift your perspective on those desires.

Karpas
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

Passover, like many of our holidays, combines the celebration of an event from our Jewish memory with a recognition of the cycles of nature. As we remember the liberation from Egypt, we also recognize the stirrings of spring and rebirth happening in the world around us. The symbols on our table bring together elements of both kinds of celebration.

We now take a vegetable, representing our joy at the dawning of spring after our long, cold winter. Most families use a green vegetable, such as parsley or celery, but some families from Eastern Europe have a tradition of using a boiled potato since greens were hard to come by at Passover time. Whatever symbol of spring and sustenance we’re using, we now dip it into salt water, a symbol of the tears our ancestors shed as slaves. Before we eat it, we recite a short blessing:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הָאֲדָמָה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree ha-adama.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruits of the earth.

We look forward to spring and the reawakening of flowers and greenery. They haven’t been lost, just buried beneath the snow, getting ready for reappearance just when we most needed them.

-

We all have aspects of ourselves that sometimes get buried under the stresses of our busy lives. What has this winter taught us? What elements of our own lives do we hope to revive this spring?

Yachatz
Source : A Night to Remember: The Haggadah of Contemporary Voices by Mishael Zion and Noam Zion http://haggadahsrus.com/NTR.html
The Pesach story begins in a broken world, amidst slavery and oppression. The sound of the breaking of the matza sends us into that fractured existence, only to become whole again when we find the broken half, the afikoman, at the end of the Seder.

This brokenness is not just a physical or political situation: It reminds us of all those hard, damaged places within ourselves. All those narrow places from which we want to break to free. In Hebrew, Egypt is called Mitzrayim, reminding us of the word tzar, narrow. Thus, in Hassidic thought, Mitzrayim symbolizes the inner straits that trap our souls. Yet even here we can find a unique value, as the Hassidic saying teaches us: "There is nothing more whole – than a broken heart."

SHARE: Pass out a whole matza to every Seder participant, inviting them to take a moment to ponder this entrance into a broken world, before they each break the matza themselves.

Maggid - Beginning
Source : Wherever You Go, There You Are

Back to basics, get rid of what is bloated and inflated

“Letting go means just what it says. It’s an invitation to cease clinging to anything- whether it be an idea, a thing, an event, a particular time, or view, or desire. It is a conscious decision to release with full acceptance into the stream of present moments as they are unfolding. To let go means to give up coercing, resisting or struggling, in exchange for something more powerful and wholesome which comes out of allowing things to be as they are without getting caught up in your attraction to or rejection of them, in the intrinsic stickiness of wanting, of liking and disliking. It’s akin to letting your palm open to unhand something you have been holding on to.”

Maggid - Beginning
Source : Traditional

Maggid – Beginning

מגיד

Raise the tray with the matzot and say:

הָא לַחְמָא עַנְיָא דִי אֲכָלוּ אַבְהָתָנָא בְּאַרְעָא דְמִצְרָיִם. כָּל דִכְפִין יֵיתֵי וְיֵיכֹל, כָּל דִצְרִיךְ יֵיתֵי וְיִפְסַח. הָשַׁתָּא הָכָא, לְשָׁנָה הַבָּאָה בְּאַרְעָא דְיִשְׂרָאֵל. הָשַׁתָּא עַבְדֵי, לְשָׁנָה הַבָּאָה בְּנֵי חוֹרִין.

Ha lachma anya dee achalu avhatana b'ara d'meetzrayeem. Kol deechfeen yeitei v'yeichol, kol deetzreech yeitei v'yeefsach. Hashata hacha, l'shanah haba-ah b'ara d'yisra-el. Hashata avdei, l'shanah haba-ah b'nei choreen.

This is the bread of affliction, which our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt. Let all who are hungry come and eat. Let all who are in need, come and share the Pesach meal. This year, we are here. Next year, in the land of Israel. This year, we are slaves. Next year, we will be free.

Refill the wine cups, but don’t drink yet.

-- Four Questions
Source : Traditional

                 Maggid – Four Questions

מַהנִּשְּׁתַּנָה

מַה נִּשְּׁתַּנָה הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה מִכָּל הַלֵּילוֹת?

Mah nish-ta-na ha-lai-lah ha-zeh mikol ha-lei-lot?

Why is this night of Passover different from all other nights of the year?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָנוּ אוֹכְלִין חָמֵץ וּמַצָּה, הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה - כּוּלוֹ מַצָּה.

She-b'chol ha-lei-lot anu och'lin cha-meitz u-matzah. Ha-laylah hazeh kulo matzah.

On all other nights, we eat either leavened or unleavened bread, why on this night do we eat only matzah?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָנוּ אוֹכְלִין שְׁאָר יְרָקוֹת, - הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה מָרוֹר.

Sheb'chol ha-lei-lot anu och'lin sh'ar y'rakot. Ha-lai-lah h-azeh maror.

On all other nights, we eat vegetables of all kinds, why on this night must we eat bitter herbs?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אֵין אֶנוּ מַטְבִּילִין אֲפִילוּ פַּעַם אֶחָת, - הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה שְׁתֵּי פְעָמִים.

Sheb'chol ha-lei-lot ein anu mat-beelin afee-lu pa-am echat.Ha-lai-lah hazeh sh'tei p'ameem.

On all other nights, we do not dip vegetables even once, why on this night do we dip greens into salt water and bitter herbs into sweet haroset?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָנוּ אוֹכְלִין בֵּין יוֹשְׁבִין וּבֵין מְסֻבִּין, - הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה כֻּלָנו מְסֻ

Sheb’khol ha-lei-lot anu och-leem bein yo-shveen u-vein m’su-been, ha-lailah hazeh kulanu m’subeen.

On all other nights, everyone sits up straight at the table, why on this night do we recline and eat at leisure?

-- Four Questions
Source : Lab/Shul Sayder

Mah Nishtana: What's New? What significant change has occurred in your life since this time last year? Name one meaningful piece of news. ​Elijah's Cup is passed around as each guest speaks. A blessing or toast concludes the round. Avadim Hayinu: Our Slavery. Identify the problem. What enslaves you today? What's holding you back from being freer, happy, and creative? ​Use a blank note of paper - on one side write HOW AM I FREE and on the other side write HOW AM I NOT FREE Dayenu: Enough. Identify possible solutions. What can you do to help end your enslavement and reduce that which holds you back from more freedom and creativity? What will help you fight the Pharaohs within? ​This round can be about personal or societal slavery and oppressions. L'shana Ha'baa: Future Vision - Next Year. We can't end the seder till we all commit to making the world a better place, with less oppression and more freedom. What is your vision of a freer world? What do you commit to in the coming year to help reduce slavery and oppression in the world? ​This can be discussed over dessert!

-- Four Children
Source : ajws.org.
At Passover each year, we read the story of our ancestors’ pursuit of liberation from oppression. When confronting this history, how do we answer our children when they ask us how to pursue justice in our time?

WHAT DOES THE ACTIVIST CHILD ASK?

“The Torah tells me, ‘Justice, justice you shall pursue,’ but how can I pursue justice?”Empower him always to seek pathways to advocate for the vulnerable. As Proverbs teaches, “Speak up for the mute, for the rights of the unfortunate. Speak up, judge righteously, champion the poor and the needy.”

WHAT DOES THE SKEPTICAL CHILD ASK?

“How can I solve problems of such enormity?” Encourage her by explaining that she need not solve the problems, she must only do what she is capable of doing.   As we read in Pirke Avot, “It is not your responsibility to complete the work, but neither are you free to desist from it.”

WHAT DOES THE INDIFFERENT CHILD SAY?

“It’s not my responsibility.”Persuade him that responsibility cannot be shirked. As Abraham Joshua Heschel writes, “The opposite of good is not evil, the opposite of good is indifference. In a free society where terrible wrongs exist, some are guilty, but all are responsible.”

AND THE UNINFORMED CHILD WHO DOES NOT KNOW HOW TO ASK...

Prompt her to see herself as an inheritor of our people’s legacy.  As it says in Deuteronomy, “You must befriend the stranger, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt.”At this season of liberation, join us in working for the liberation of all people. Let us respond to our children’s questions with action and justice. 

-- Exodus Story
Source : Isaac Zones

Key Elements to Include in your Telling of the Passover Story
by Isaac Zones

o   Context: Joseph sold to slavery by brothers and heads to Egypt.  Interprets Pharoah’s dreams and helps Egypt stock up on food before predicted famine.  Joseph rescues rest of family and brings them to Egypt when they are starving.  Jews begin living in Egypt.

o   Centuries later the new Pharoah fears the power of the many Jews and enslaves them before they can rise up against him.  He also orders the death of the first born sons.

o   Moses is the first born son in his family.  He is sent out in a basket on the Nile river and sister Miriam follows.  He is adopted by the Pharoah’s daughter and becomes a “Prince of Egypt.”

o   At an older age he fights an Egyptian slave master who is beating a Jewish slave and Moses kills the slave master.  He then flees the palace and becomes a shepherd and marries.

o   While tending his flock Moses comes across G-d disguised as a burning bush and G-d tells Moses to instruct Pharoah to “let his people go.”  Moses brings his brother Aaron because he’s got a stutter and is timid.

o   Moses’ plea is denied and G-d sends a plague: turning water to blood.  After each plague Moses returns to pharaoh to demand he let his people go.  Each time he is denied.  G-d sends 10 plagues: Blood, Frogs, Lice, Beasts, Pestilence, Boils, Hail, Locusts, Darkness and finally the death of the first born son. 

o   At the sight of his firstborn son’s death, Pharoah instructs Moses to take the Jews away.  The Jews had marked their doors with lamb’s blood so that the angel of death would “pass-over” their homes and not kill their first born.

o   The Jews fled quickly with only enough time to make matzah instead of bread.

o   Pharoah’s army chased them and soon they were stuck when they approached the Red Sea.

o   Nachshon entered the water and only when he had gone in past his nose did the sea part and allow the Jews to cross safely.  The waters crashed down on the Egyptians when they tried to cross and the army drowned.

o   Jews celebrated on the other side with Moses’s sister Miriam leading the way.  G-d reminded the Jews not to celebrate the death of the Egyptians – for they were also his children.

o   This began a 40 year journey through the desert where they searched for the promised land.  Over this time they receive the torah and 10 commandments at Mt. Sinai and learned who they were as a people.  No Jew from Egypt lived to see the promised land and the Jews entered the land of milk and honey as a people who had been born free.

-- Exodus Story
Source : original (Steve Fink)

Back to Human Bondage

by Steve Fink

What is the relevance of spending a Pesach evening talking about Redemption and Freedom?

 

The 18th century Scottish historian/economist Lord Alexander Fraser Tytler (1747-1813) wrote in 1778 that the world’s great civilizations generally progress through a similar series of cycles.  After saying that the average existence of the world's greatest civilizations has been 200 years, he summarizes the course of a nation passing through 9 steps.

 

People in bondage first require a spiritual faith to give them courage to pursue freedom.  Freedom to choose and develop his G-d-given gifts brings opportunities and leads to affluence.

 

But affluence tends to lead to selfishness; selfishness leads to complacency; complacency leads to apathy; apathy degenerates into dependency; and dependency can return one back to bondage.

Here’s the sequence:


Bondage; Spiritual Faith; Freedom; Abundance; Selfishness; Complacency; Apathy; Fear; Dependency; Bondage

 

Note that the first generation throws off the shackles of bondage only to have a later generation through apathy and indifference allow itself to once again become enslaved.

Again and again, after freedom brings opportunity and some degree of plenty, the competent become selfish; luxury loving and complacent; while the incompetent and unfortunate grow envious and covetous; and all three groups turn aside from the hard road of freedom to worship the golden Calf of economic security.

 

In his book "When Nations Die; Ten Warning Signs of a Culture in Crisis," Jim  Nelson Black reviews history, analyzing the death of nations, and identifying ten warning signs of a nation in crisis: (1) Lawlessness, (2) Loss of Economic Discipline, (3) Rising Bureaucracy, (4) Decline of Education, (5) Weakening of Cultural Foundations, (6) Loss of Respect for Tradition, (7) Increase in Materialism, (8) Rise in Immorality, (9) Decay of Religious Belief and (10) Devaluing of Human Life.

 

Freedom by itself is not sufficient for constructing the quality of society and culture appropriate to man, his dignity and his capacity.  Freedom must be oriented beyond itself to truth:  the truth of man's origin, the truth of man's nature and the truth of man's destiny.

 

The decline and fall of nations is usually due to internal factors rather than external threats.  Even though some may have fallen to barbarians, their demise ultimately came because of moral and spiritual weakness which manifested itself as military weakness.

 

 

-- Exodus Story
Source : National Center for Jewish Healing, Holiday Resource Sampler, Volume 1: Passover

A GUIDED VISUALIZATION © Rabbi Susan Freeman, 2003

This is a journey from slavery to freedom.

Close your eyes and take several slow deep breaths. Feel your body as being very heavy. Take a few minutes to go through each body part, feet to head, and feel the heaviness, the weight of every limb, every bone . . .

You were a slave once in the land of Egypt. Remember when you were a slave among slaves. Go back. You were pressed hard: “Ruthlessly they made life bitter for [you] with harsh labor at mortar and bricks and with all sorts of tasks in the field. Va-yemar-reru et- chai-yay-hem ba-avodah kashah b’chomer u’vil-vay-neem u’ve-chol avodah ba-sah-deh et kol avo-dah-tam asher avdu va-hem be-farech” (Exodus 1:14)

Rub your fingers together. Feel the muddy dirt between your fingertips. Imagine the mud on your skin, the streaks of dirt on your arms and your legs, the crusty sweat on your brow. Note the muddiness on the surface of your body, but realize that this is not what is of most concern to you.

What is most troubling is a feeling of sluggishness circulating through you. The feeling of being a slave, being pressed. “And the taskmasters pressed [you] . . .         V’ha-nog-seem atzeem . . . “ (Exodus 5:13)

It’s as if the mud fills your mind and body, as well.

The words of Pharaoh swirl through your head . . . “Be off now to your work! No straw shall be issued to you, but you must produce your quota of bricks!” (Exodus 5:18)

“You must not reduce your daily quantity of bricks. Lo tee-gre-u mi-liv-nay-chem d’var yom b’yomo.” (Exodus 5:19)

You feel heavy, weighted down by the imprisoning experience of being a slave.

Though you feel heavy and weighted down, you have an intense desire to be alleviated of your burdens; to be released from what is pressing down on you; to wash away the bitterness . . . wash away the mud.

You want to wash away the mud . . . From your skin, from your brow. Wash away the mud that fills your mind and body . . . Wash away the sluggishness circulating through you . . .

Words, emotions are stirring inside you. What are they? Listen to your inner voice. You can ask for help, you can call out. There is a Power, a Loving Force to help lift you, to help transform your burdens. The Mysterious embrace of God will receive and envelop your pain. What do your words say; what does your silence express? Listen. What do you hear?

Your intense desire to go free propels you along as a certain momentum builds in the environment around you. The momentum propelling you is the swelling wave of sentiment that surrounds you – to go; to leave the mud, the bricks, the bitterness and slavery behind.

Release the bricks in your arms and allow your bent-over body to straighten. Brush off the dirt from your skin, dry your brow. Breathe easier as you join in the journey away from slavery, towards freedom.

You are journeying away from slavery towards the sea, towards freedom.

As you glimpse the sea, you feel compelled to go towards the water. You feel an urge for the water to wash over your skin. Hurry to the water, splash some of the cool, cleansing water over you. Pour handfuls of water through your hair; splash water on your face, your shoulders; scoop water over your back . . .

The water is refreshing. Your skin is tingling, soothed. And you step away from the water.

Still, you want to clear the sense of muddiness from your mind; the internal, clogging feeling of heaviness.

It is night now. Lie down on the shore of the sea, away from the water. Still hold on to the feeling, the image of clear, refreshing water. Imagine this clear purity flowing through your body, cleansing your mind. A flow that is pure, clear, refreshing. Feel the clarity circulating through your veins, your arteries. Clarity of mind, clarity of body . . .

It is while you are lying down on the shore of the sea that the passageway to freedom is being prepared for you. As you prepare yourself, so too, the passage to freedom is opening.

“Then Moses held out his held out his arm over the sea and the Eternal drove back the sea with a strong east wind all that night, and turned the sea into dry ground.” (Exodus 14:21)

It is morning now. The water that you had poured and splashed over you the day before is no longer there. “The waters were split. Va-yee-bak-u ha-ma-yeem.” (Exodus 14:21) And the sense of water flowing, washing through you is gone as well. What 

remains is breath, clear breath – air which circulates freely around you, inside of you. Breathe in deeply; and exhale fully.

Breathe in deeply; and exhale fully. Enjoy your breathing; enjoy its fullness, its lightness.

“And the Israelites went in to the sea on dry ground, the waters forming a wall for them on their right and on their left.” (Exodus 14:21-22)

The walls surrounding you are water, yet they are totally secured by Divine Will. The massive ocean waves, the watery depths have obeyed the will of the Almighty. You fear no harm. You feel protected, as if a sturdy hand is guiding you.

Walk through the passageway to freedom. Walk along the dry ground. Walk through the walls of water on your right and on your left. Walk through the passageway to freedom.

The fullness of the experience of freedom envelops you. You are more aware than ever before. You feel certainty of God’s presence, God’s role in your journey.

When, shortly after you have walked through the passageway to freedom, God speaks, you know these words to be true:

“I, the Eternal One, am your healer. Ani Adonai ro-feh-cha.” (Exodus 15:26) 

 

-- Ten Plagues
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

As we rejoice at our deliverance from slavery, we acknowledge that our freedom was hard-earned. We regret that our freedom came at the cost of the Egyptians’ suffering, for we are all human beings made in the image of God. We pour out a drop of wine for each of the plagues as we recite them.

Dip a finger or a spoon into your wine glass for a drop for each plague.

These are the ten plagues which God brought down on the Egyptians:

Blood | dam | דָּם

Frogs | tzfardeiya |  צְפַרְדֵּֽעַ

Lice | kinim | כִּנִּים

Beasts | arov | עָרוֹב

Cattle disease | dever | דֶּֽבֶר

Boils | sh’chin | שְׁחִין

Hail | barad | בָּרָד

Locusts | arbeh | אַרְבֶּה

Darkness | choshech | חֹֽשֶׁךְ

Death of the Firstborn | makat b’chorot | מַכַּת בְּכוֹרוֹת

The Egyptians needed ten plagues because after each one they were able to come up with excuses and explanations rather than change their behavior. Could we be making the same mistakes? Make up your own list. What are the plagues in your life? What are the plagues in our world today? What behaviors do we need to change to fix them? 

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Adaptation by Brandi Ullian
Singing "Dayenu" is a much-loved tradition at the Passover Seder. We recognize all the things that God gave the Israelites throughout their exodus and journey in the desert, and respond with the phrase "Dayenu," meaning "it would have been enough." But even those who don't believe in a supernatural God can still sing "Dayenu" honestly.

"Dayenu" is a song all about appreciating what we have and what we’ve been given. It is easy to get lost in the great lists of things we don’t have and the demands we are always fighting for. However, we should take stock of what we do have and appreciate those gifts, because it's possible we could have much less or nothing at all.

If I had only one pair of shoes and not two, dayenu! If I had a tiny apartment and not a house, dayenu! If I had a only two meals a day to eat and not three, dayenu!

The traditional "Dayenu" recounts everything the Israelites were thankful for as they left Egypt. The message is that just one of these events that led to their freedom, "it would have been enough." We'll only sing a few of the verses, but you can read the translated text of the full song below.

Dayenu

Ilu ho-tsi, ho-tsi-a-nu, Ho-tsi-anu mi-Mitz-ra-yim Ho-tsi-anu mi-Mitz-ra-yim Da-ye-nu! (Had we not been taken out of Egypt, it would've been enough!)

Chorus: Da-da-ye-nu, Da-da-ye-nu, Da-da-ye-nu, Da-da-ye-nu, Da-ye-nu Da-ye-nu

Ilu na-tan, na-tan la-nu, Na-tan la-nu et-ha-Sha-bat, Na-tan la-nu et-ha-Sha-bat, Da-ye-nu! (Had we not been given the Sabbath, it would have been enough!)

(Chorus)

Ilu na-tan, na-tan la-nu, Na-tan la-nu et-ha-To-rah, Na-tan la-nu et-ha-To-rah, Da-ye-nu! (Had we not been sent the Torah, it would have been enough!)

(Chorus)

Had we been taken out of Egypt and not had judgment executed upon the Egyptians, it would've been enough. Had judgment been executed upon the Egyptians and not upon their idols, it would've been enough. Had judgment been executed upon their idols, and not their firstborn, it would've been enough. Had judgment been executed upon their firstborn, and we had not received their wealth, it would've been enough. Had we received their wealth, and not had the sea split for us, it would've been enough. Had the sea been split the sea for us, and we had not been led through it to dry land, it would've been enough. Had we been led to dry land, and our enemies not drowned in the sea behind us, it would've been enough for us. Had our enemies drowned, and our needs not have been provided for in the desert for 40 years, it would've been enough. Had we been supported in the desert and not been given bread, it would have been enough. Had we been given bread and not been given the Sabbath, it would have been enough. Had we been given the Sabbath and not been brought to Mount Sinai, it would have been enough. Had we been brought to Mount Sinai and not been sent the Torah, it would have been enough. Had we been sent the Torah and not been brought to Israel, it would have been enough. Had we been brought to Israel and not been built the Holy Temple, it would have been enough.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

בְּכָל־דּוֹר וָדוֹר חַיָּב אָדָם לִרְאוֹת אֶת־עַצְמוֹ, כְּאִלּוּ הוּא יָצָא מִמִּצְרָֽיִם

B’chol dor vador chayav adam lirot et-atzmo, k’ilu hu yatzav mimitzrayim.

In every generation, everyone is obligated to see themselves as though they personally left Egypt.

The seder reminds us that it was not only our ancestors whom God redeemed; God redeemed us too along with them. That’s why the Torah says “God brought us out from there in order to lead us to and give us the land promised to our ancestors.”

---

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who redeemed us and our ancestors from Egypt, enabling us to reach this night and eat matzah and bitter herbs. May we continue to reach future holidays in peace and happiness.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the second glass of wine!

Rachtzah
Source : Earth Justice Seder

After washing our hands for the second time, and calling to mind the importance of water, we say: 

ָבּרוּךְ ַא ָתה יי, ֱאלֹ ֵהינוּ ֶמ ֶלךְ ָהעוֹ ָלם, ֲא ֶשר ִק ְד ָשנוּ ְבּ ִמ ְצווֹ ָתיו, ְו ִצ ָוּנוּ ַעל ְנִטיַלת ָיָדִים. 

Baruch atah, Adonai Eloheinu, Melech haolam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al nitilat yadayim.
Blessed are You, Eternal our God, Sovereign of the universe, who has sanctified us with Your commandments and Commaned Us to Wash Our Hands

For more information on the environmental justice, please visit rac.org/enviro
For all Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism resources, please visit
rac.org/Passover .

Motzi-Matzah
Source : JewishBoston.com

The blessing over the meal and matzah | motzi matzah | מוֹצִיא מַצָּה

The familiar hamotzi blessing marks the formal start of the meal. Because we are using matzah instead of bread, we add a blessing celebrating this mitzvah.

בְָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, הַמּוֹצִיא לֶֽחֶם מִן הָאָֽרֶץ:

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, hamotzi lechem min ha-aretz.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who brings bread from the land.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתַָיו וְצִוָּֽנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מַצָּה:

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat matzah.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to eat matzah.

Distribute and eat the top and middle matzah for everyone to eat.

Maror
Source : http://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/maror/

Why do we eat maror? It represents the bitterness of slavery. Tradition says that by eating the herbs we feel the bitterness ourselves, and can more easily imagine ourselves as slaves. But this is not just a tradition in Judaism - it is a commandment. Both Exodus and Numbers contain the instruction to eat the Pesach sacrifice with "unleavened bread and bitter herbs." 

But we also eat the maror with haroset. Although the haroset symbolizes slave labor by reminding us of mortar for bricks our ancestors laid in Egypt, it has a sweet taste. This is to remind us that sometimes our subjugation can be masked in familiar sweetness. By eating them together, we remind ourselves that life is both sweet and bitter, and the importance of maintaining balance between the two.

Let the maror also remind us that pain is not meaningless. That the suffering our ancestors endured was not in vain. Instead, it lead to their outcry for freedom, and their commitment to their own redemption.

Maror
Source : JewishBoston.com

Dipping the bitter herb in sweet charoset | maror  |מָרוֹר   

  In creating a holiday about the joy of freedom, we turn the story of our bitter history into a sweet celebration. We recognize this by dipping our bitter herbs into the sweet charoset. We don’t totally eradicate the taste of the bitter with the taste of the sweet… but doesn’t the sweet mean more when it’s layered over the bitterness?

ברוּךְ אַתָּה יְיַָ אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָּֽנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מרוֹר:

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat maror.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to eat bitter herbs.

Koreich
Source : Leah Rosenthal in http://elmad.pardes.org/2016/04/the-pardes-companion-to-the-haggadah/
After performing most of the central mitzvot of the evening (telling the story of the Exodus eating matza and maror, etc.) and just before we are about to enjoy the festive holiday meal, the haggadah structures a moment in which we symbolically repeat the practice of Hillel the Elder who would “wrap” his portion of the paschal offering with matza and maror and eat it as a type of sandwich, in literal fulfillment of the verse “it shall be eaten on matzot and maror”. We too prepare a combination of matza and maror (and haroset) and eat in remembrance of this practice and of the Pesach tradition during the time when the Temple still stood.

Let us pause a moment to consider the character of Hillel, a central and formative personality within the pantheon of Rabbinic figures, and to consider why, perhaps, the haggadah asks us to spend a moment recreating Hillel’s personal practice of eating the Pesach sacrifice.

Hillel, founder of the great and influential Beit Hillel, is well known for his personal qualities of tolerance, humility and pursuit of peace. Many of the tales of Hillel and his teachings reflect this characterization. This is expressed in famous citations such as: “Hillel says: Be of the disciples of Aaron, loving peace and pursuing peace, loving your fellow creatures and drawing them near to the law.” The quality of being a rodef shalom (pursuer of peace) requires the ability to recognize the value of different perspectives and the skill of unifying conflicting truths into a harmonious whole. It requires the recognition that single individuals perceive only a portion of the complete truth. Hillel says: “If I am not for myself, who is for me? And when I am for myself, what am I? And if not now, when?"

The Rabbis of the Talmudic world joined Hillel in this understanding, promoting this view and ruling that Halakha (Jewish law) should follow Beit Hillel as “…they were kindly and modest, they studied their own rulings and those of Beit Shammai (Hillel’s halakhic opponent), and were even “...so [humble] as to mention the actions of Beit Shammai before their own." Appropriately, the haggadah depicts Hillel as requiring the consumption of the Pesach sacrifice the food of redemption, through an act of combining − the korekh. Only the harmonious merging of a variety of components produces the true redemptive experience

Leah Rosenthal teaches Talmud

Shulchan Oreich
Tzafun
Source : National Center for Jewish Healing, A Personal Passover Journal for memory and Contemplation

Finding and Eating the Afikoman

In hiding and seeking the afikoman, we reunite the two parts separated at the beginning of the seder. At this moment, we have the opportunity to discover lost parts of ourselves, to become reconciled with relatives who have become distant and to find wholeness in aspects of Judaism which may not have been part of our lives. Finding that which is hidden is a powerful message when we feel loss and lost. Within our loss, we find ways of healing the broken part of our lives.

Bareich

שִׁיר הַמַּעֲלות 
בְּשׁוּב ה' אֶת שִׁיבַת צִיּון 
הָיִינוּ כְּחלְמִים: 
אָז יִמָלֵא שחוק פִּינוּ 
וּלְשׁונֵנוּ רִנָּה 
אָז יאמְרוּ בַגּויִם 
הִגְדִּיל ה' לַעֲשות עִם אֵלֶּה: 
הִגְדִּיל ה' לַעֲשות עִמָּנוּ 
הָיִינוּ שמֵחִים: 
שׁוּבָה ה' אֶת שְׁבִיתֵנוּ 
כַּאֲפִיקִים בַּנֶּגֶב: 
הַזּרְעִים בְּדִמְעָה בְּרִנָּה יִקְצרוּ: 
הָלוךְ יֵלֵךְ וּבָכה נשא מֶשֶׁךְ 
 הַזָּרַע בּא יָבא בְרִנָּה נשא אֲלֻמּתָיו:

Shir hamaalot,
b'shuv Adonai et shivat Tziyon hayinu k'chol'mim.
Az yimalei s'chok pinu, ul'shoneinu rinah.
Az yom'ru vagoyim: Higdil Adonai laasot im eileh.
Higdil Adonai laasot imanu, hayimu s'meichim.
Shuvah Adonai et sh'viteinu kaafikim baNegev.
Hazor'im b'dimah b'rinah yiktzoru.
Haloch yeileich uvachoh, nosei meshech hazara,
bo yavo v'rinah, nosei alumotav.

A pilgrim song. When God restored the exiles to Zion it seemed like a dream. Our mouths were filled with laughter, our tongues with joyful song. Then they said among the nations: "God has done great things for them." Yes, God is doing great things for us, and we are joyful. Restore our fortunes, O God, as streams revive the desert. Then those who have sown in tears shall reap in joy. Those who go forth weeping, carrying bags of seeds, shall come home with shouts of joy, bearing thier sheaves.

Bareich

The Third Glass of Wine

The blessing over the meal is immediately followed by another blessing over the wine:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the third glass of wine!

Hallel
Source : JewishBoston.com

Singing songs that praise God | hallel | הַלֵּל

This is the time set aside for singing. Some of us might sing traditional prayers from the Book of Psalms. Others take this moment for favorites like Chad Gadya & Who Knows One, which you can find in the appendix. To celebrate the theme of freedom, we might sing songs from the civil rights movement. Or perhaps your crazy Uncle Frank has some parody lyrics about Passover to the tunes from a musical. We’re at least three glasses of wine into the night, so just roll with it.

Fourth Glass of Wine

As we come to the end of the seder, we drink one more glass of wine. With this final cup, we give thanks for the experience of celebrating Passover together, for the traditions that help inform our daily lives and guide our actions and aspirations.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן:

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the fourth and final glass of wine! 

Hallel
Source : JewishBoston.com

The Cup of Elijah

We now refill our wine glasses one last time and open the front door to invite the prophet Elijah to join our seder.

In the Bible, Elijah was a fierce defender of God to a disbelieving people. At the end of his life, rather than dying, he was whisked away to heaven. Tradition holds that he will return in advance of messianic days to herald a new era of peace, so we set a place for Elijah at many joyous, hopeful Jewish occasions, such as a baby’s bris and the Passover seder.

אֵלִיָּֽהוּ הַנָּבִיא, אֵלִיָּֽהוּ הַתִּשְׁבִּי,

אֵלִיָּֽהוּ, אֵלִיָּֽהוּ,אֵלִיָּֽהוּ הַגִּלְעָדִי.

בִּמְהֵרָה בְיָמֵֽנוּ יָבוֹא אֵלֵֽינוּ

עִם מָשִֽׁיחַ בֶּן דָּוִד, 

עִם מָשִֽׁיחַ בֶּן דָּוִד.

Eliyahu hanavi Eliyahu hatishbi Eliyahu, Eliyahu, Eliyahu hagiladi Bimheirah b’yameinu, yavo eileinu Im mashiach ben-David, Im mashiach ben-David

Elijah the prophet, the returning, the man of Gilad: return to us speedily, in our days with the messiah, son of David.

Nirtzah
by HIAS
Source : HIAS Seder Supplement
I will take you to be my people... ...

When we rise up from our Seder tables, let us commit ourselves to stamping out xenophobia and hatred in every place that it persists. Echoing God’s words when God said, “I take you to be my people,” let us say to those who seek safety in our midst, “we take you to be our people.” May we see past difference and dividing lines and remember, instead, that we were all created b’tzelem Elohim, in the image of God. May we see welcoming the stranger at our doorstep not as a danger but as an opportunity – to provide safe harbor to those seeking refuge from oppression and tyranny, to enrich the fabric of our country and to live out our Jewish values in action. Blessed are You, Adonai Our God, who has created us all in Your image.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

Blessed are You, Ruler of the Universe, who creates the fruit of the vine. 

Nirtzah
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

Nirtzah  marks the conclusion of the seder. Our bellies are full, we have had several glasses of wine, we have told stories and sung songs, and now it is time for the evening to come to a close. At the end of the seder, we honor the tradition of declaring, “Next year in Jerusalem!”

For some people, the recitation of this phrase expresses the anticipation of rebuilding the Temple in Jerusalem and the return of the Messiah. For others, it is an affirmation of hope and of connectedness with  Klal Yisrael, the whole of the Jewish community. Still others yearn for peace in Israel and for all those living in the Diaspora.

Though it comes at the end of the seder, this moment also marks a beginning. We are beginning the next season with a renewed awareness of the freedoms we enjoy and the obstacles we must still confront. We are looking forward to the time that we gather together again. Having retold stories of the Jewish people, recalled historic movements of liberation, and reflected on the struggles people still face for freedom and equality, we are ready to embark on a year that we hope will bring positive change in the world and freedom to people everywhere.

In  The Leader's Guide to the Family Participation Haggadah: A Different Night, Rabbi David Hartman writes: “Passover is the night for reckless dreams; for visions about what a human being can be, what society can be, what people can be, what history may become.”

What can  we  do to fulfill our reckless dreams? What will be our legacy for future generations?

Our seder is over, according to Jewish tradition and law. As we had the pleasure to gather for a seder this year, we hope to once again have the opportunity in the years to come. We pray that God brings health and healing to Israel and all the people of the world, especially those impacted by natural tragedy and war. As we say…

לְשָׁנָה הַבָּאָה בִּירוּשָׁלָֽיִם

L’shana haba-ah biy’rushalayim

NEXT YEAR IN JERUSALEM!

Nirtzah
Source : Rabbi Ruth Abusch-Magder

May we all be released from the narrow places that constrict us. May the slavery and oppression that exists in all corners of the world be ended. May we recall the suffering of the past and be inspired to make the world a better place. Happy Passover, and may we all find the freedom and redemption we need.

Conclusion
Source : Judy Chicago, 1979

And then all that has divided us will merge
And then compassion will be wedded to power
And then softness will come to a world that is harsh and unkind

And then both men and women will be gentle
And then both women and men will be strong
And then no person will be subject to another's will

And then all will be rich and free and varied
And then the greed of some will give way to the needs of many

And then all will share equally in the Earth's abundance

And then all will care for the sick and the weak and the old

And then all will nourish the young 
And then all will cherish life's creatures

And then everywhere will be called Eden once again

Songs

(By Rabbi Dan Liben, to the tune of "There's No Business Like Show Business")

There's no Seder like our Seder,
There's no Seder I know.

Everything about it is Halachic
Nothing that the Torah won't allow.
Listen how we read the whole Haggadah
We speak some Hebrew
'Cause we know how.

There's no Seder like our Seder,
Come listen to our tale:

Moses took the people out into the heat
They baked the matzah
While on their feet
Isn't that a story
That just can't be beat?
And now it's time to go!

Songs
Source : Adapted by Brandi Ullian

(To the tune of "Take Me Out to the Ballgame!")

Take me out to the Seder, take me out to the crowd.

Feed me some soup with a matzah ball

I don't care for the parsley at all

And let's, root, root, root for the leader, that he will finish his spiel

Oh it's one, two, ten plagues you're out at the Seder meal!

Take me out to the Seder, take me out to the crowd.

Maror and matzah and charoset time

We'll get tipsy off four cups of wine

Oh let's root, root, root for Elijah, that he will soon reappear.

And we'll hope, hope, hope that we'll meet once again next year!

Songs
Source : Time of Israel
Songs
Pharaoh's Nile (tune of "Gilligan's Island") by Randi and Murray Spiegel, Passover 1995 Just lean right back and you'll hear a tale, a tale of a fateful trip That started back in ancient times while under Pharaoh's whip. Well Moses was a pious man, God made him brave and sure Though Pharaoh was a mighty man, his heart was not pure, his heart was not pure. Old Pharaoh started getting tough, the Jews were harshly bossed If not for the courage of the fearless few our people would be lost, our people would be lost. They cried to God please rescue us, conditions here are vile. Send Moses, and Aaron, too, to save our children and wives. We'll leave this land at God's behest Here on Pharaoh's Nile. So God said Moses take your staff and with your brother go To Pharaoh you will plead your case to let my people go. Well Moses, he sure did his best, but Pharaoh was not moved Til God sent down ten dreadful plagues and His power was proved, His power was proved. The frogs, the lice, and even boils, could not make Pharaoh bend 'Til slaying of the first born males threatened Pharaoh's life to end, threatened Pharaoh's life to end. The Jews escaped miraculously, when God helped them to flee, Egyptian armies followed them, but drowned in the deep Red Sea. So this is a tale of our ancestors, they wandered a long, long time. They had to make the best of things, it was an uphill climb. So join us here each year my friends, it's sure to be worthwhile Retelling how the Jews escaped, far from Pharaoh's Nile. Words copyright (c) 1995 by Randi and Murray Spiegel. Permission is hereby granted to reproduce this material in any non-profit medium provided that its content is not altered and this notice is appended. We would appreciate receiving a copy of any publication in which it appears: Randi Spiegel, 48 Roosevelt Street, Roseland, NJ 07068 / rspieg{at_sign_here}yahoo.com
Songs
Source : Randi and Murray Spiegel, Passover 2000
Leaving on a Desert Plane (tune of "Leaving on a Jet Plane") by Randi and Murray Spiegel, Passover 2000 All our bags are packed, we're ready to go We're standing here outside our doors We dare not wake you up to say goodbye But the dawn is breakin' this early morn' Moses is waiting, he's blowing his horn We're planning our escape so we won't die You'll miss me, as you will see You've been dealt a harsh decree You held us like you'd never let us go We're leaving from this great strain We pray we won't be back again God knows, can't wait to go. There's so many times you've let us down Your many crimes have plagued our town I tell you now they were all mean things Every place I go, you'll shrink from view, Every song I sing will be 'gainst you I won't be back to wear your ball and chain You'll miss me, as you will see You've been dealt a harsh decree You held us like you'd never let us go We're leaving through a wet plain We hope we won't be back again God knows, can't wait to go. Now the time has come to leave you One more time, let me diss you Close your eyes, we'll be on our way Dream about the days to come When you'll be left here all alone About the time when I won't have to say You'll miss me, as you will see You've been dealt a harsh decree You held us like you'd never let us go We're leaving all our bread grain We know we won't be back again God knows, can't wait to go. Words copyright (c) 2000 by Randi and Murray Spiegel. Permission is hereby granted to reproduce this material in any non-profit medium provided that its content is not altered and this notice is appended. We would appreciate receiving a copy of any publication in which it appears: Randi Spiegel, 48 Roosevelt Street, Roseland, NJ 07068 / rspieg{at_sign_here}yahoo.com
Songs

Adir hu, adir hu ...

Chorus:
Yivneh veito bekarov,
Bimheirah, bimheirah,
Beyameinu beka'rov.

Ehl benei, Ehl benei
Benei veit-cha beka'arov.

Bachur hu, gadol hu, dagul hu (chorus)

Hadur hu, vatik hu, zakai hu (chorus)

Chassid hu, tahor hu, yachid hu (chorus)

Kabir hu, lamud hu, melech hu (chorus)

Nora hu, sagiv hu, iizuz hu (chorus)

Podeh hu, tzadik hu, kadosh hu (chorus)

Rachum hu, shaddai hu, takif hu

Yivneh veito bekarov,
Bimheirah, bimheirah,
Beyameinu beka'arov.
Ehl benei, Ehl benei
Benei veit-cha beka'arov!

Songs

To the tune of “Shake It Off” by Taylor Swift:

I stay up too late
Got 4 cups on my brain
That’s what people say, nuu-nuuu
That’s what people say, nuu-nuuu

I go on too many rants
But I can’t make any sense
At least that’s what people say, nuu nuuu
That’s what people say, nuu nuuu

But I keep leaning
Can’t stop, won’t stop eating
It’s like I got this freedom
In my mind
Singing, “Dayenu all night.”

‘Cause the seder’s on a plate, plate, plate, plate, plate
Mitzrim gonna hate, hate, hate, hate, hate
Marror, just gonna shake, shake, shake, shake, shake
I shake it off, Shake Marror off

Afikomen gonna break, break, break, break, break
And the matzahs gonna bake, bake, bake, bake, bake
Marror just gonna shake, shake, shake, shake, shake
I shake marror off, I shake it off

I never miss a step
Leaving Egypt was a Shlep
And that’s what they don’t see, mmm-mmm
That’s what they don’t see, mmm-mmm

I’m kiddushing on my own (kiddushing on my own)
I make the rules up as I go (rules up as I go)
And that’s what they don’t know, oy vey
That’s what they don’t know,oy vey

But I keep Leaning
Can’t stop, won’t stop dipping
It’s like I got this freedom
In my mind
Singing, “Dayenu, all night.”
‘Cause the seder’s on a plate, plate, plate, plate, plate
Mitzrim gonna hate, hate, hate, hate, hate
Marror, just gonna shake, shake, shake, shake, shake
I shake it off, I shake Marror off (Oy, Oy)
Afikomen gonna break, break, break, break, break
And the matzahs gonna bake, bake, bake, bake, bake
Marror just gonna shake, shake, shake, shake, shake
I shake marror off, I shake Marror off
Shake Marror off, I shake it off, (marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off,(marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off,(marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off(marror)

Hey, hey, hey
Just think while you’ve been leaning down and out about the Pharoah and the dirty, dirty plagues of the world,
You could’ve been getting down to this sick vort.

My afikoman lost by my new girlfriend
She’s like “Oh, my god!” but I’m just gonna break.
And to the fella over there with the Elijah good hair
Won’t you lean on over, baby? We can shake, shake, shake

Yeah ohhh

‘Cause the seder’s on a plate, plate, plate, plate, plate
Mitzrim gonna hate, hate, hate, hate, hate
Marror, just gonna shake, shake, shake, shake, shake
I shake it off, I shake it off (Oy, Oy)
Afikomen gonna break, break, break, break, break
And the matzahs gonna bake, bake, bake, bake, bake
Marror just gonna shake, shake, shake, shake, shake
I shake marror off, I shake it off (marror)

Shake Marror off, I shake it off,
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off, (marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off, (marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off (marror)

Shake Marror off, I shake it off,
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off,(marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off,(marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off(marror)

Shake Marror off, I shake it off,
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off (you’ve got to),
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off, (marror)
I, I, I shake it off, I shake it off(marror)

- See more at: http://www.bangitout.com/seder-songs-2015-shake-marror-off/#sthash.rN7RGqnI.dpuf

Songs

For the late night singing at your seder – a few ballads – here is one:

To the tune STAY WITH ME by Sam Smith

Guess it’s true, I’m not good at the 4 questions
But I still need to ask, cause of redemption
These seder nights never seem to go to plan
I just want you to leave, will u skip to the end?

Oh, won’t you seder with me?
‘Cause we’re all going free
This ain’t shmura, it’s clear to see
But darling, lean with me

Why is this seder so political?
No, it’s not a good look, get some self control
And deep down I know I stained my shirt
But you can lean with me so chrain doesn’t hurt

Oh, won’t you eat matzah with me?
‘Cause you got the afikomen yasee
This ain’t shmura, it’s clear to see
But darling, lean with me

Oh, won’t you sing Chad Gad Ya with me?
‘Cause 2 zusim is all I need
This ain’t shmura, it’s clear to see
But darling, lean with me

- See more at: http://www.bangitout.com/seder-songs-2015-stay-with-me/#sthash.iYbNbo1F.dpuf

Songs
Source : Irvine SobelmanJenny Sobelman & Martha Ackelsberg

(to the tune of “I Could Have Danced All Night”)

I could have eaten more,
I could have eaten more,
but it’s afikomen time.

The Seder rituals
and all those victuals,
the evening was sublime.

I had my matzo with charoset
and matzo dipped in chocolate too.

I drank down all my wine
and now I’m feeling fine.
How good to share this meal with you!

Songs

Passover Song Parodies

Eser Makkot (The Ten Plagues)

(Sung to the tune of “Michelle”)

(by Gary Teblum)

Es-ser Makkot

these are plagues of which we must take note

Eser Makkot

Es-ser Makkot

Blood and frogs and lice and cattle disease

Cattle disease

Please free them, please free them, please free them

that's what God tried to say

But Pharoah wouldn’t sway

It was not until that tenth plague came that he’d

understand

Es-ser Makkot

Locusts, hail and darkness o’er the land

Over the land

God needs to, God needs to, God needs to

God needs to make Pharoah see

Oh, what might come to be

Until we jews give him the blues, Pharoah, he’ll be mean

We hate you

Please free them, please free them, please them

You should know by now

You’ll let them go some how

Until you do new plagues will brew so you’ll understand

Es-ser Makkot

Blood and frogs and lice and first borns did die

First borns did die

And you will say the only words we want for you to

understand

Go from my land.

Yesterday

(Sung to the tune of “Yesterday”)

(by Gary Teblum)

Yesterday

We were slaves in Egypt yesterday

Now be thankful that we’re free today

We must remember yesterday

Slavery

Pharoah kept us all in slavery

We were working hard as hard can be

Oh yesterday saw slavery

Why we couldn’t go, I don’t know

He made us stay

Then God set us free

Now we teach ‘bout yesterday

Yesterday

We were brought forth so that we could pray

Now I need to teach the kids to say

We must remember yesterday

Why we couldn’t go, I don’t know

He made us stay

Then God set us free

Now we teach ‘bout yesterday

Yesterday

We were brought forth so that we could pray

At the seder, teach the kids to say

Why we remember yesterday

Hardened Heart

(Sung to the tune of “A Hard Day’s Night”)

(by Gary Teblum)

He had a hardened heart

And he would not let us go

He had a hardened heart

And here’s what you should know

Each time a plague did them in

Moshe thought he would win

But Pharoah’s mind stood tight

You they know slaved all day

Building the pyramids was their thing

And they waited for Moshe to say

I’ve heard from Pharoah as the king

Though every day they may moan

Soon they can put down that stone

And they will feel okay

To our home, that’s where we’re headed tonight

A new home, get there and we’ll be alright

Yeh

He had a hardened heart

And he would not let us go

He had a hardened heart

And here’s what you should know

Each time a plague did them in

Moshe thought he would win

But Pharoah’s mind stood tight

Though every day they may moan

Soon they can put down that stone

And they will feel okay

To our home, that’s where we’re headed tonight

A new home, get there and we’ll be alright

Yeh

He Freed Us

(Sung to the tune of “She Loves You”)

(by Gary Teblum)

He freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah

He freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah

He freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah

You think you’re not so free

Well, it was so yesterday-yi-yay

It’s just like you were there

And he told us what to say-yi-yay

You know he freed us,

and you know that can’t be bad

Oh yes, he freed us,

and you know we should be glad

God said you must act so

As if you were there too

And then God says you’ll know

How we maintain the glue

You know he freed us,

and you know that can’t be bad

Oh yes, he freed us,

and you know we should be glad

Oh, he freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah

He freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah

With a God like that

You know we should be glad

You know he freed the Jews

He brought us from that land

As if you were there too

Grab on to his hand

You know he freed us,

and you know that can’t be bad

Oh yes, he freed us,

and you know we should be glad

Oo, he freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah

He freed us, yeah, yeah, yeah

And with a god like that

You know we should . . . be glad

Yeah, Yeah, Yeah

Yeah, Yeah, Yeah, Yeahhhhh.

All My Leaven

(Sung to the tune of “All My Lovin”)

(by Gary Teblum)

Search my house and I’ll find it

Tomorrow I’ll miss it

The feather will help me be true

And a candle as well

Means that then I can sell

And I’ll sell all my leaven to you

I’ll find crumbs in the kitchen

The kinder will pitch in

I’ll try not to leave any clue

And then while its away

I’ll eat matzah each day

‘cause I sold all my leaven to you

All my leaven, I will sell to you

All my leaven, Rabbi, I’ll be true

I’ll find crumbs in the kitchen

The kinder will pitch in

I’ll try not to leave any clue

And then while its away

I’ll eat matzah each day

‘cause I sold all my leaven to you

All my leaven, I will sell to you

All my leaven, Rabbi, I’ll be true

All my leaven, All my leaven

Woo, all my leaven, I will sell to you

THE ORDER OF THE SEDER

(Sung to the tune of "It's A Small World")

(by Gary Teblum)

We wash our hands

And we bless the wine

Greens put in salt water

Dippings so fine

There's so much that we see

Celebrating we're free

It's our Pass-Over seder.

(chorus)

It's our Pass-Over seder

It's our Pass-Over seder

It's our Pass-Over seder

It's our Passover seder.

We break the matzah

Four questions are asked

We tell the story

About our past

The motzi we say

Because that is the way

Of our Pass-Over seder.

(chorus)

It's our Pass-Over seder

It's our Pass-Over seder

It's our Pass-Over seder

It's our Passover seder.

I WILLNOT LET THEM GO

(Sung to the tune of "Hi-Ho, Hi-Ho")

(by Gary Teblum)

Oh no, Oh no

I will not let them go

I will not let the Jews go free

Oh no, Oh no, Oh no.

Oh No, Oh no.

I will not let them go

Your people will not leave this land

Oh no, Oh no.

Our Passover Things

(Sung to the tune of "My Favorite Things" from The Sound of Music)

Cleaning and cooking and so many dishes

Out with the hametz, no pasta, no knishes

Fish that's gefillted, horseradish that stings

These are a few of our Passover things.

Matzah and karpas and chopped up haroset

Shankbones and kiddish and yiddish neuroses

Tante who kvetches and uncle who sings

These are a few of our Passover things.

Motzi and maror and trouble with Pharoahs

Famines and locusts and slaves with wheelbarrows

Matzah balls floating and eggshell that clings

These are a few of our Passover things.

When the plagues strike

When the lice bite

When we're feeling sad

We simply remember our Passover things

And then we don't feel so bad.

There's No Seder Like our Seder

(Sung to the tune of "There's no Business like Show Business")

There's no seder like our seder,

There's no seder I know.

Everything about it is halachic

Nothing that the Torah won't allow.

Listen how we read the whole Haggadah

It's all in Hebrew

'Cause we know how.

There's no Seder like our seder,

We tell a tale that is swell:

Moses took the people out into the heat

They baked the matzoh

While on their feet

Now isn't that a story

That just can't be beat?

Let's go on with the show!

Take Us Out of Egypt

(Sung to the tune of "Take Me Out to the Ball Game")

Take us out of Egypt

Free us from slavery

Bake us some matzoh in a haste

Don't worry 'bout flavor--

Give no thought to taste.

Oh it's rush, rush, rush, to the Red Sea

If we don't cross it's a shame

For it's ten plagues,

Down and you're out

At the pesach history game.

Afikomen

(Sung to the tune of "Oklahoma")

Aaaaa.......fikomen! what a very special Pesach treat.

A dessert we share, we can't compare, So much joy from just a hunk of wheat!

Thaaaaaaa........t is why we hide it early on from everyone A custom that we get, from

Kosher chefs, to convince us eating Matzah's fun. On a shelf or hidden away Floor or

sofa, 'neath Uncle Sid's toupee. It's too much work, to search for your dessert Yes, I'm

looking for Afikomen Afikomen, oy, vey, gevalt.....let's check the couch!!AFIKOMEN!!!

The Ballad of Mo Amramson

(Sung to the tune of "The Ballad of Jed Clampett")

Come and listen to a story 'bout a man named Mo,

His people they were slaves to the evil Pharoah,

Until one day he was lookin' at a bush,

And he heard the voice of G-d, though he wasn't a lush---

The LORD, that is,

I AM,

The Big G.

Next thing you know, Mo's talkin' to Pharoah,

Mo says, "G-d said you gotta let my people go!"

But the king says, "No, they always will be slaves to me!"

So G-d sent down ten big plagues on Pharoah's whole country---

Blood 'n frogs, that is,

Pestilence,

Special effects.

When the first borns died, Pharoah sent the Jews away,

They ran and ate some matza on that very happy day,

So now we have our Seder to commemorate that feat---

We drink some wine and talk a lot, we sing and also eat!

Matza, that is,

Maror too.

And good food.

Y'all come back now, y'hear!

Don't Sit on the Afikomen

(Sung to the tune of "Glory, Glory, Halleluyah")

My Dad at every Seder breaks a Matza piece in two

And hides the Afikomen half-A game for me and you

Find it, hold it ransom for the Seder isn't through

'till the Afikomen's gone.

Chorus:

Don't sit on the Afikomen.

Don't sit on the Afikomen.

Don't sit on the Afikomen.

Or the Meal will last all night

One year Daddy hid it 'neath a pillow on a chair

But just as I raced over, my Aunt Sophie sat down there

She threw herself upon it-Awful crunching filled the air

And crumbs flew all around

Chorus

There were matza crumbs all over-Oh, it was a messy sight

We swept up all the pieces though it took us half the night

So, if you want your seder ending sooner than dawn's light,

Don't sit on the Afiko-o-men

Chorus

Elijah

(Sung to the tune of "Maria")

Elijah!

I just saw the prophet Elijah.

And suddenly that name

Will never sound the same to me.

Elijah!

He came to our seder

Elijah!

He had his cup of wine,

But could not stay to dine

This year--

Elijah!

For your message all Jews are waiting:

That the time's come for peace

and not hating--

Elijah--

Next year we'll be waiting.

Elijah!

Gilligan's Exodus

(Sung to the theme from "Gilligan's Island")

Recline right back and you'll hear a tale, a tale of a fateful trip.

that started many years ago in old, ancient Egypt.

The Jews were forced to work as slaves, they suffered that ordeal.

We celebrated their Exodus with a three hour meal, a three hour meal!

The Pharoah was an evil dude, his wrath would not replent

If not for the effort of the fearless jews.....we'd all be keeping Lent(2x)

They landed in the desert after parting the Red Sea

With Moses, and Aaron too, each Israelite and his wife

A movie star, the Professor and Miriam.........here on Passover night!!

I've Been Cooking for this Seder

(Sung to the tune of "I've Been Working on the Railroad")

I've been cooking for this seder

Erev Pesach day

Making matzah balls and kugel

So we'll feast as well as pray

Can't you smell the pareve sponge cake

It rises up so little without yeast

Can't you hear our voices singing

At this joyous Pesach feast

Mama, you can cook

Mama, you can cook

Milchidik and fleishidik and pareve, too

Mama, you can stew

Mama, you can stew

Your seder food's delicious and we thank you

Les Miselijah

(Sung to the tune of "Do you hear the people Sing" from Les Miserables)

Do you hear the doorbell ring,

And it's a little after ten?

It can only be Elijah

Come to take a sip again.

He is feeling pretty fine

But in his head a screw is loose.

So perhaps instead of wine

We should only give him juice

Pesach Macarena

(Sung to the tune of "Macarena")

Take coconut, eggs, and lots of grease,

Cook 'em in the oven for your Pesach feast.

They won't rise 'cause they ain't got yeast.

Hey, macaroons!

Mix matzah meal with eggs for a goop

Form into balls and drop in your soup

So heavy on your spoon it will make it droop

Hey, kneidlach!

Through the woods a rabbi took a hike

Found a lake at the edge of a dike

For her favorite dish caught some carp and pike

Hey, gefilte fish!

What do you need for your seder plate?

What do you eat before it's too late?

What do you take to anti-constipate?

Hey, stewed prunes!

What do we crave on the very last night

Sprinkled with cheese for a dinner that's light

Al dente noodles that we long to bite

Hey, macaroni!

Pharoah's Nile

(Sung to the theme from "Gilligan's Island")

Just lean right back and you'll hear a tale, a tale of a fateful trip

That started back in ancient times, while under Pharoah's whip.

Well Moses was a pious man, G-d made him brave and sure,

Though Pharoah was a mighty man, his heart was not pure,

his heart was not pure.

Old Pharoah started getting tough, the Jews were harshly bossed.

If not for the courage of the fearless few, our people would be lost,

our people would be lost.

They cried to G-d, please rescue us, conditions here are vile.

Send Moses, and Aaron, too, to save our children and wives.

We'll leave this land at G-d's behest, here on Pharoah's Nile.

So G-d said Moses take you staff and with your brother go.

To Pharoah you will plead your case, to let my people go.

Well Moses, he sure did his best, but Pharoah was not moved,

'Til G-d sent down ten dreadful plagues, and His power was proved,

His power was proved.

The frogs, the lice, and even boils, could not make Pharoah bend

'Til slaying of the first born males, threatened Pharoah's life to end,

threatened Pharoah's life to end.

The Jews escaped miraculously, when G-d helped them to flee.

Egyptian armies followed them, but drowned in the deep Red Sea.

So this is a tale of our ancestors, they wandered a long, long time.

They had to make the best of things, it was an uphill climb.

So join us here each year my friends, it's sure to be worthwhile,

Retelling how the Jews escaped, far from Pharoah's Nile.

Take Me Out to the Seder

(Sung to the tune of "Take Me Out to the Ballgame")

Take me out to the Seder

Take me out to the crowd

Feed me some matzah and kosher wine

We'll wine and dine and we'll have a good time

For we'll root for Moshe Rabbeinu

And our crossing through the Reed Sea

For it's one, two, ...four cups of wine

We rejoice that we are free!

Sung to: On Top of Old Smokey

(by Albert Resnick)

Oh near to mt. Sinai

And close by the sea

We'll build us a nation

That's our destiny

With bricks and with mortar

We'll each build a home

Where love and affection

Cannot ever roam

Men only: yes our women will adore us!

Women only: we'll praise you to the skies

Men only: they'll all melt before us!

Women only: when we look in your eyes

All together now: this matza will keep us

From going insane

When we stack our gefilta

Fish up with chrain

With latkes and carpus

Kneidels all glatt

Keep stuffing yourself and

You end up with a pot

Leaving on a Desert Plane

(Sung to the tune of "Leaving on a Jet Plane")

All our bags are packed we're ready to go

We're standing here outside our doors

We dare not wake you up to say goodbye

But the dawn is breakin' this early morn'

Moses is waiting, he's blowing his horn

We're planning our escape so we won't die

You'll miss me, as you will see

You've been dealt a harsh decree

You held us like you'd never let us go

We're leaving from this great strain

We pray we won't be back again

God knows, can't wait to go.

There's so many times you've let us down

Your many crimes have plagued our town

I tell you now they were all mean things

Every pace I go, you'll shrink from view,

Every song I sing will be 'gainst you

I won't be back to wear your ball and chain

You'll miss me, as you will see

You've been dealt a harsh decree

You held us like you'd never let us go

We're leaving through a wet plain

We hope we won't be back again

God knows, can't wait to go.

Now the time has come to leave you

One more time, let me diss you

Close your eyes, we'll be on our way

Dream about the days to come

When you'll be left here all alone

About the time when I won't have to say

You'll miss me, as you will see

You've been dealt a harsh decree

You held us like you'd never let us go

We're leaving all our bread grain

We know we won't be back again

God knows, can't wait to go.

Mostly Matza

(Sung to W.A. Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik)

Notes: Do not repeat the music, as in the original Eine Kleine Nachtmusik.

Punctuation is provided only to help sing phrases and is not gramatically correct.

Recommended starting note is E and not G as in the original music.

Recommend writing to me for the written music.

Moses followed all of G-d's commands, helped the Jews escape from

Pharaoh's hands. Egypt was where the Jews all lived, and happy with

their lives, until the Pharaoh came, and made them slaves; he worked

them night and day, and held them all at bay, they had to get away.

Moses, saw a bush, burning bright, G-d appeared, told him he must

save the Jews. "Moses, you must go to Egypt speak to Pharaoh tell

him I am not amused. Yes you must go, and tell him tell him he must

let the Hebrews go yes he must let my people go. Their pleas I can't

ignore, they will be slaves no more. You tell Pharaoh he will be

punished if he doesn't listen and won't let my people go."

Moses went to Egypt land, went to see old Pharaoh. Threatened him on

G-d's behalf. Instead it, just made Pharaoh laugh. He said "I will

not free them, they are my slaves forever. So go back where you came

from, give up on your endeavor. I am strong. You are weak, so turn

around go on home and stay there 'cause I never will give in."

So Moses said to Pharaoh, "I have my G-d behind me. You will release

my people, or you'll be very sorry. Plagues will come, horrid

plagues so be aware what'll happen to you if you don't release the

Jews. I've warned you for the very last time the plagues will come

and G-d won't be kind as you will soon find." Pharaoh said "I have

not changed my mind."

This is where the tale gets really good. First, God changed the

water into blood* * rhyme with "good" :)

"A trick," said his magicians, endorsed Pharaoh's position. But Pharaoh

hadn't reckoned, that God would send a second. Frogs hopped around

the city, the picture wasn't pretty. The people were surrounded, the

croaking noise resounded. Well Pharaoh still resisted, what Moses

had insisted. A third plague was enlisted, and so the lice persisted.

It seemed as if the Jews could never leave, Pharaoh's land. It seemed,

as if they'd never leave, but, they knew, they'd just have to believe.

All of, a sudden it looked bleak, with wild beasts ev'rywhere, the

people ran and shrieked. The cattle all died where they had been

grazing and the boils were torture they could not endure. People,

were in pain, they agreed, that the Jews, should be free from

slavery. Pharaoh, would not listen to them Moses said a seventh

plague had been decreed. The hail came down, down from the sky in

torrents, hail fell down so hard. And such was Pharaoh's fate, God

sent plague number eight the swarms of locusts filled the sky to

terrify. Soon the sun's rays were suppressed. Egypt was in

darkness. Then the tenth plague was begun, and Pharaoh, at last was,

undone.

"Put lamb's blood on your doorposts," the Jews were all instructed.

Egyptians did not know this, an awful plague erupted. Death appeared,

at their door and ev'ry first-born in Egypt died including Pharaoh's

fav'rite child. The Jews all followed Moses, they made a swift

departure. But Pharaoh's armies followed, intending to recapture.

Just ahead, was the sea so Moses stretched out his hand to part it

and they walked through carefully. The armies followed foolishly,

the waters closed the soldiers were drowned the Jews were then free.

Now, we celebrate our freedom ev'ry Passover and this, is why we dine

on mostly matza, pasta we do not, ingest. Consuming mostly matza

which the rabbis blessed. We tell this story all about the Hebrews'

quest, at, this matza fest.

Songs

My Favorite Things

 [Sung to the tune of "These are a few of my favorite things"]

Cleaning and cooking and so many dishes

Out with the hametz, no pasta, no knishes

Fish that's gefilted, horseradish that stings

These are a few of our Passover things.

 Matzoh and karpas and chopped up haroset

 Shankbones and Kiddish and Yiddish neuroses

 Tante who kvetches and uncle who sings

 These are a few of our Passover things.

 Motzi and maror and trouble with Pharoahs

 Famines and locusts and slaves with wheelbarrows

 Matzoh balls floating and eggshell that cling

 These are a few of our Passover things.

 When the plagues strike

 When the lice bite

 When we're feeling sad

 We simply remember our Passover things

 And then we don't feel so bad.

 There's No Seder Like our Seder

 (sung to the tune of "There's no Business like Show business")

 There's no seder like our seder,

 There's no seder I know.

 Everything about it is Halachic

 nothing that the Torah won't allow.

 Listen how we read the whole Haggadah

 It's all in Hebrew

 'Cause we know how.

 There's no Seder like our seder,

 We tell a tale that is swell:

 Moses took the people out into the heat

 They baked the matzoh

 While on their feet

 Now isn't that a story

 That just can't be beat?

 Let's go on with the show!

 Take Us Out of Egypt

 (sung to the tune of "Take me out to the ball game")

 Take us out of Egypt

 Free us from slavery

 Bake us some matzoh in a haste

 Don't worry 'bout flavor--

 Give no thought to taste.

 Oh it's rush, rush, rush, to the Red Sea

If we don't cross it's a shame.

 For it's ten plagues,

 Down and you're out

 At the Pesach history game.

Take me out to the Seder

Take me out to the crowd.

Feed me some matzah and kosher wine,

We’ll wine and dine and we’ll have a good time.

For we’ll root for Moshe Rabbeinu

And our crossing through the Red Sea.

For it’s one, two, okay four cups of wine,

We rejoice that we are free!

The Ballad of the Four Sons

 (to the tune of "Clementine")

 Said the father to his children, "At the seder you will dine,

 You will eat your fill of matzoh, you will drink four cups of

 wine."

 Now this father had no daughters, but his sons they numbered four.

 One was wise and one was wicked, one was simple and a bore.

 And the fourth was sweet and winsome, he was young and he was

 small.

 While his brothers asked the questions he could scarcely speak at

 all.

 Said the wise one to his father, "Would you please explain the

 laws?

 Of the customs of the seder, will you please explain the cause?"

 And the father proudly answered, "As our fathers ate in speed,

 Ate the paschal lamb 'ere midnight, and from slavery were freed."

 So we follow their example, and 'ere midnight must complete

 All the seder and we should not, after 12 remain to eat.

 Then did sneer the son so wicked, "What does all this mean to you?"

 And the father's voice was bitter, as his grief and anger grew.

 "If you yourself don't consider, a son of Israel,

 Then for you this has no meaning, you could be a slave as well."

 Then the simple son said simply, "What is this," and quietly

 The good father told his offspring, "We were freed from slavery."

 But the youngest son was silent, for he could not ask at all.

 His bright eyes were bright with wonder as his father told him all.

 My dear children, heed the lesson and remember ever more

 What the father told his children told his sons that numbered four.

Gilligan’s Island

Recline right back and you’ll hear a tale,

A tale of a fateful trip

That started many years ago in old, ancient Egypt.

The Jews were forced to work as slaves,

They suffered that ordeal;

We celebrate their Exodus with a three hour meal,

A three hour meal!

The Pharaoh was an evil dude,

His wrath would not repent

If not for the effort of the fearless Jews,

We’d all be keeping lent,

Yes, we’d all be keeping lent!

They landed in the desert after parting the Red Sea,

With Moses, and Aaron too, each Israelite and his wife,

A movie star, the Professor and Miriam…

Here on Passover night!

Songs

We Say a Little Prayer to You
to the tune of “I Say a Little Prayer For You”

Tonight we are dining.
All of us are reclining.
We say a little prayer to You.

Tonight we are focused
On boils and lice and locusts.
We say a little prayer to You.

(Chorus) Forever and ever
We’ll join on this night
and we will love You.
Together, forever
we’ll sing of Your might.
Oh, how we’ll love You.
Forever and ever
That’s how it must be
Because without You
None of us here would be free!

While children are roamin’
In search of the Afikomen,
We say a little prayer to You.

You gave us l’chaim
Bringing us from Mitzrayim.
We say a little prayer to You.

(Repeat Chorus)

©2000 Barbara Sarshik 

Songs

Mighty Moses

(Sung to "Davy Crocket")

Found by the princess on the shores of the Nile

Brought up Egyptian for a little while

Always remembered that he was a Jew

And to his people, he was always true.

Moses, Mighty Moses!

Leader of the Jewish pioneers.

Came before Pharaoh, many years ago

Said to him, "Pharaoh let my people go!"

For if you don't your people will suffer

And day by day, it's gonna get tougher

Moses, Mighty Moses!

Leader of the Jewish pioneers.

Into the wilderness from Egypt of old,

Came mighty Moses, so brave and so bold.

With outstretched arm and a wave of his hand,

He parted the sea and crossed on dry land.

Moses, Mighty Moses!

Leader of the Jewish pioneers.

He led them on for forty long years,

He bound their wounds and dried their tears

He gave them manna from the Lord's own hand

And pointed the way to the promised land

Moses, Mighty Moses!

Leader of the Jewish pioneers.

Up Mount Sinai Moses did climb,

Left his people for Aaron to mind;

He was not afraid though the thunder did roar

And brought back the commandments  forevermore.

Moses, Mighty Moses!

Leader of the Jewish pioneers.

Songs
Source : various

to the tune of “Hey Jude”

Hey, Jews, don’t be afraid.

You were made to Escape Mitzrayim.

In Sinai, the Lord will help you to live

And He will give you all some mayim.

Hey, Jews, it’s time to start.

God will part all The Red Sea waters.

Remember, pack matzah and be real brave.

God’s gonna save your sons and daughters.

The Lord will free you from your pain,

The whip, the chain. Have faith,

and you’ll all be happy later.

Hey, Jews, your tales from days of old will all be told

By all your descendants at their seder.

Da da da da da Da da da da.

Hey, Jews, don’t be afraid.

You were made to

Escape Mitzrayim. I

n Sinai, the Lord will help you to live

And He will give you all some mayim

Mayim, mayim, mayim, mayim, mayim, mayim, wooow!

Da da da da da da da Da da da da

Hey, Jews

Etc.

Songs
Source : various

to the tune of “All That Jazz”

Come on, babe, it’s time to say a prayer

WITH ALL THESE JEWS.

Grab some matzah, lean back in your chair

WITH ALL THESE JEWS.

Tell a story from the days of old

When our people could be bought and sold.

Just sit back and let the tale be told

WITH ALL THESE JEWS.

God said, “Moses, take a look around.

AT ALL THESE JEWS.

Go tell Pharaoh that it’s way past time

TO FREE THESE JEWS.”

God showed Moses what he had to do,

Helped the Jews tell Pharaoh “Toodleoo.”

So tonight we’re singing Dayenu

WITH ALL

THESE

JEWS.

Songs
Source : various

to the tune of “Fifty Ways to Leave Your Lover”

We build the pyramids. We live in pain and fear.

We’re beaten and we’re bullied by the brutal overseer.

So Moses, can you help us, cause we really need to hear

About the Fifty Ways to Leave Mitzrayim.

Fifty Ways to Leave Mitzrayim.

So Moses said, I’ve seen the way a bush can burn.

And Adonai has told me that the Jews are my concern.

So if you listen closely, I believe that you will learn

About the Fifty Ways to Leave Mitzrayim.

Fifty Ways to Leave Mitzrayim.

(Chorus)

Don’t move a brick, Rick,

Make sure to pray, Ray,

Bring on a plague, Gregg,

Listen to me.

Leave in the night, Dwight,

Don’t wait for the bread, Ned,

Cross the Red Sea, Lee,

And get yourself free.

Moses continued, We can flee our evil foe.

And Adonai will lead us to the land where we can go.

So pack your matzah quickly if you really want to know

About the Fifty Ways to Leave Mitzrayim.

Fifty Ways to Leave Mitzrayim.

(Chorus)

Don’t move a brick, Rick,

Make sure to pray, Ray,

Bring on a plague, Gregg,

Listen to me.

Leave in the night, Dwight,

Don’t wait for the bread, Ned,

Cross the Red Sea, Lee,

And get yourself free.

Songs
Source : Frozen

(sung loosely to the tune of Let it Go)

The sand burns hot in the desert tonight

The foot prints of my people can be seen

A kingdom of subjugation under Pharaoh who is mean

Our people built his temples and pyramids to the sky

Oh dear lord hear our people’s cry...

Let us go, let us go

Can’t hold us back any more

Let us go, let us go.

Find someone else to do your chores

Elohim, adoni hear us pray,

Lets pack our things

The desert never bothered us anyway

It’s funny how some distance

makes Egyptians all seems small and the masters that controlled us can’t get to us at all

It’s time to see what we can do

The power of a people who’ve broken through

Torah v emet the laws for me.

We’re free.

Let us go, let us go.

We are one with the lord

Let us go, let us go.

We hope this Seder didn’t make you bored

So here we’ll sit and here we’ll stay

Let the Seder go on

The Maror never bothers me anyway...

by Hillary Goldberg

Songs
Source : http://www.jewishmag.com/jimmenu/passover.htm

The night of Pesach


By Michael Druck © 1992


It was the night of Pesach 
And all through the house 
You couldn't find bread 
In anyone's mouth 
The table was set with karpas and fish 
And maror and wine 
And potato knish 
With Daddy and Mommy 
And poor Uncle Lou 
Grandma and Grandpa 
And Sammy and Sue 
A place was set where nobody sat 
For Elijah the Prophet and a cup that was fat 
With wine and cheer 
For all that came by 
To see our set table 
And thank G-d with a sigh 
How lucky we were to be all at home 
And none of us should feel ever left all alone


First we made kiddush 
Then the washing of hands 
Karpas is next 
Passed 'round the table to Sam 
Dividing the matzoh and telling the tale 
Of the Jews leaving Egypt for Israel 
We passed the maror 
And ate our fish 
And hid the matzoh away with a dish 
And Grandpa stood up and said with a tear 
"We should all be together for Pesach next year!" 
Have a wonderful Pesach 
With joy in your home 
And from me to you 
I will say a SHALOM! 

Songs
Source : Medieval, found in Parnes Haggadah and others

Our seder now has ended

with its history-laden rites:

we have journeyed from Mitzrayim

on this storied night of nights.

We bore witness, we remembered

our covenant with You.

So we pray that You redeem us,

as you pledged Your word to do.

(Can be sung to many tunes, including theme songs from Star Wars and the Flintstones.)

Songs
Source : www.bangitout.com

To the Tune of the Brady Bunch Theme song

Here's the story 

of our great-grand Bubby and Zeide 

Who were enslaved for about 210 years. 

All of them were stuck in Egypt, with their Jewish brothers, 

it was awfully hard work and bitter tears.

Here’s their story, 

Lets call it a “Seder” 

Which we tell about how they finally broke free!

God sent Moshe to deal with Pharaoh,

and also to split the red sea.

Till that one day when God himself came to our rescue 

And they knew it was much more than a hunch, 

That this group of slaves would somehow form a nation. 

That's the way we all became the Jewish Bunch. 

The Jewish Bunch,

That's the way we all became the Jewish Bunch. 

The Jewish Bunch

Songs
Source : www.bangitout.com

To the tune of Piano Man by Billy Joel

It's nine o'clock at the Seder Night 

The regular family members shuffle in 

There's an old man sitting next to me makin’ love to his Manishewitz yayin

He says, "Son, can you tell me bout the Exodus 

I'm not really sure how it goes

But it's sad and it's sweet and it’s got no leavened wheat 

so wake me up when we get to the matza hors’ devours 

la la la, di da da La la, di di da da yay nu

Sing us a song, it’s the Seder, man 

Sing us a song tonight 

Well, we're all in the mood for the Exodus 

And this First Cup got us all feelin' all right

Songs
Source : www.bangitout.com

To the tune of Hotel California

On an Egyptian desert highway 

Cool wind in our hair 

Warm smell of mazohballs 

Rising up through the air. 

Up ahead in the distance 

There’s no food in sight

My head grew heavy, and my sight grew dim 

Why is this different then all other nights!?

There Elijah stood in the doorway 

I heard his dayanu song 

And I was thinking to myself 

This could be Heaven or Maagid prolonged!? 

Then I asked the 4 questions 

The hagadah taught me the way 

There were voices for each 4 sons I thought I heard them say:


Chorus 

Welcome to our Passover Seder 

Such a lovely place 

Such a lovely place (background) 

There’s no need to race! 

Plenty of room at our Passover Table 

It’s that time of year It’s that time of year (background) 

When we can’t serve Beer!

Songs
Source : www.bangitout.com

To the Tune of Mockingbird

Hush, little Moses, don't say a word, 

God's going to give you a bush to burn. 

And if that burning bush don't sing, 

God's going to make you goto the Egyptian king. 

And if that king's heart turns hard,

God's going to give you a get-out-of-jail-free-card 

And if that get out of jail card don't cash, God's going to give you a walking staff.

And if that walking staff breaks,

God's going to bring blood to the lakes. 

And if that bloody water gets dumped, 

God's going to bring you frogs that jump. 

And if those frogs don’t play nice,

God's going to bring you creepy crawly lice. 

And if those lice don't seem to itch, 

God's gonna bury your animals in a ditch, 

And if wild animals are ruining the soil, 

God's gonna bring you skin burning boils,

 And if those boils don't make you wail,

God's gonna pour down on you fiery hail, 

And if that hail ain't as big as nuts, 

God's gonna send you swarmy locusts, 

And if those locust eat all your bark,

God's gonna make the sun go dark,

And if you thought darkness is the worst of the storms, 

God's gonna take your very first born. 

So here is a lesson you should know, 

If you were a good pharaoh you would just let my people go

Songs
Source : www.bangitout.com

To the "Three's Company" Theme Song

Come and knock on our door ... 

We've been waiting for you ... 

Where the 5th cup is yours and yours and yours,

Eliyahu's company, too!

Come join us for our sedor... 

Take 15 steps that are new ... 

We've lived in galus that now needs your hatzolos, 

Eliyahu's coming IY"H soon.

You'll see that life is a seder and Jerusalem is calling for you ... 

Israe'ls our rendez-vous, 

Eliyhu's coming now Nu!

Songs
Source : www.bangitout.com

To the Tune of the "CHEERS" THEME SONG

Making your seder in Florida today takes every penny you've got. 

Taking a tax break from all your school tuitions, sure would help a lot. 

Wouldn't you like to get away? 

Sometimes you want to go, where everybody knows your last name, 

and they're always related in some way. 

You wanna be where you can see, that other people paid the same (for hotel) 

You wanna be where everybody knows where you're stayin. (Fountain Bleau)

You wanna go where people are showy, Brooklyn in Florida is all the same, 

You wanna go where everybody flies business class on the plane.

You want to go where people know, the boardwalk is packed Chol Hamoed 

You want to go where everybody knows your brother's sister's husband's cousin's butcher's wife's rabbi's brother's name.

Songs
Source : www.bangitout.com

To the “Addams Family" Theme song

They're creepy and they're snoopy, 

Neurotic and kooky, 

all craving mazoball soupy, 

Your Seder Family. 

Their house is clean from chometz 

Your uncle seems to have turrets 

a non stop night to Kvetch 

Your Seder Family. 

So open up your hagadah 

a pillow for grandmotha 

We can’t stand and love eachotha 

Your Seder Family!

Songs
Source : www.bangitout.com

I know a place, 

Where the karpas is really greener, 

Wheat,spelt orrye, 

Becomes leavened with water!

Sipping Kedem grape juice, 

Leaning on my seder pillows! 

The sons - wise, bad n’ mute, 

try'na snag the afikomen!

You could travel the world, 

But nothin' comes close, 

To that final fourth Kose! 

Once you seder with u-us, you'll be eating gebructs! 

Oh oh oh ohhhhhhh!

Kadish Urchatz - we're unforgettable, 

Karpas, Yachatz – Passover Shnapps! 

Bitter Herbs, 

So hot - it’ll melt your popsicle!

Oh oh oh ohhhhhhh!

4 questions, we're undeniable, 

Fine, fresh, fierce, 

Horseraddish shell shock! 

Passover represent, now put your Hagadah up!

Oh oh oh ohhhhhhh!

Songs
Source : Unknown

(Sung to the tune of "My Favorite Things" from The Sound of Music)

cleaning and cooking and so many dishes

out with the hametz no pasta no knishes

fish thats gefillted horseradish that stings

these are a few off our passover things.

 Chorus:

matzah and karpas and chopped up haroset

shankbones and kiddish and yiddish neuroses

tante who kvetches and uncle who sings

these are a few off our passover things.

Chorus:

matzi and marror and trouble with pharahs

famines and locusts and slaves with wheelbaarrows

matzah balls floating and eggshell that clings

these are a few off our passover things.

Chorus:

when the plagues strike

when the lice bite

when were feeling sad

we simply remember our passover things

and then we dont feel so bad.