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Introduction

Barukh Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech ha-Olam asher kid'shanu b'mitzvotav v'tzivanu l'hadlik neir shel (Shabbat v'shel)Yom Tov.

You are Blessed, O God, Spirit of the World, who makes us holy with mitzvot and commands us to kindle the light of (Shabbat and of) the festival day.

Introduction
Source : http://www.jewbelong.com/passover/

AS WE BEGIN TONIGHT’S SEDER, let’s take a moment to be thankful for being together. We make a small community of storytellers. But, why this story again? Most of us already know the story of Passover. The answer is that we are not merely telling, or in tonight’s case, singing a story. We are being called to the act of empathy. Not only to hear the story of the Exodus but to feel as if we too were being set free. Some at our table observe this holiday every year and some are experiencing it for the first time. Some of us are Jewish, others are not. Passover is the most widely celebrated Jewish Holiday and is enjoyed by people of various faiths. Freedom is at the core of each of our stories. All who are in need, let them come celebrate Passover with us. Now we are here. Next year in the land of Israel.

Introduction

This is an imaginary first Seder after Israel became a State. Who has Reuben Rubin 'invited' to the table? 

Kadesh
by HIAS
Source : HIAS Seder Supplement
As you bless the four cups of wine and remember the different ways God protected the Children of Israel during their exodus from Egypt, offer these words of blessing for the ways we can stand in support of today’s refugees as they journey to safety. This is the first of the blessings over the four cups of wine that we say throughout the Passover Seder. You will find the other three blessings interspersed throughout this supplement.

I will free you... 

As we remember our own liberation from bondage in Egypt, we express gratitude for the ability to work as God’s partners in continued and continual redemption for today’s refugees. As our wine cups overflow in this moment of joy, we hold out hope for the day when every person in search of refuge in every corner of the earth can recall a story of freedom, reflect on a journey to security from violence and persecution and no longer yearn for a safe place to call home. Blessed are You, Adonai our God, who frees those who are oppressed.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

Blessed are You, Ruler of the Universe, who creates the fruit of the vine. 

Karpas
Source : Adapted from Jewishboston.com
Passover combines the celebration of an event from Jewish memory with a recognition of the cycles of nature. As we remember the liberation from Egypt, we also recognize the stirrings of spring and rebirth happening in the world around us. The symbols on our table bring together elements of both kinds of celebration.

We now take a vegetable, in this case parsely, to represent our joy at the dawning of spring after our long, cold winter. Whatever symbol of spring and sustenance we’re using, we now dip it into salt water, a symbol of the tears our ancestors shed as slaves. Before we eat it, we recite a short blessing:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הָאֲדָמָה Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree ha-adama. We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruits of the earth.

We look forward to spring and the reawakening of flowers and greenery. They haven’t been lost, just buried beneath the snow, getting ready for reappearance just when we most needed them.

We all have aspects of ourselves that sometimes get buried under the stresses of our busy lives. What has this winter taught us? What elements of our own lives do we hope to revive this spring?

Yachatz
-- Four Questions
Source : Traditional

                 Maggid – Four Questions

מַהנִּשְּׁתַּנָה

מַה נִּשְּׁתַּנָה הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה מִכָּל הַלֵּילוֹת?

Mah nish-ta-na ha-lai-lah ha-zeh mikol ha-lei-lot?

Why is this night of Passover different from all other nights of the year?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָנוּ אוֹכְלִין חָמֵץ וּמַצָּה, הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה - כּוּלוֹ מַצָּה.

She-b'chol ha-lei-lot anu och'lin cha-meitz u-matzah. Ha-laylah hazeh kulo matzah.

On all other nights, we eat either leavened or unleavened bread, why on this night do we eat only matzah?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָנוּ אוֹכְלִין שְׁאָר יְרָקוֹת, - הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה מָרוֹר.

Sheb'chol ha-lei-lot anu och'lin sh'ar y'rakot. Ha-lai-lah h-azeh maror.

On all other nights, we eat vegetables of all kinds, why on this night must we eat bitter herbs?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אֵין אֶנוּ מַטְבִּילִין אֲפִילוּ פַּעַם אֶחָת, - הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה שְׁתֵּי פְעָמִים.

Sheb'chol ha-lei-lot ein anu mat-beelin afee-lu pa-am echat.Ha-lai-lah hazeh sh'tei p'ameem.

On all other nights, we do not dip vegetables even once, why on this night do we dip greens into salt water and bitter herbs into sweet haroset?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָנוּ אוֹכְלִין בֵּין יוֹשְׁבִין וּבֵין מְסֻבִּין, - הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה כֻּלָנו מְסֻ

Sheb’khol ha-lei-lot anu och-leem bein yo-shveen u-vein m’su-been, ha-lailah hazeh kulanu m’subeen.

On all other nights, everyone sits up straight at the table, why on this night do we recline and eat at leisure?

-- Four Children
Source : Matan
“The Four Children” provides an opportunity to talk about modern-day labels and how we think of people with varying strengths and weaknesses. Can any child really be summarized with one terse label? Can any individual be described so succinctly – wise, wicked, simple, and not knowing how to ask? Advocates for children with learning differences (or anyone with "special needs") often talk about “people-first language.” For example, we talk about a “child with autism” but not an “autistic child;” we refer to “children with learning disabilities” but not “learning disabled children.” The differences may seem slight. But we use people-first language to recognize the whole person and not identify him/her by any one ability or disability. So, too, we can think about – and discuss - the four children of the Passover seder as parts of a whole.
-- Exodus Story
Source : Frozen

Let Us Go

(sung loosely to the tune of Let it Go)

The sand burns hot in the desert tonight

The foot prints of my people can be seen

A kingdom of subjugation under Pharaoh who is mean

Our people built his temples and pyramids to the sky

Oh dear lord hear our people’s cry...

Let us go, let us go

Can’t hold us back any more

Let us go, let us go.

Find someone else to do your chores

Elohim, adoni hear us pray,

Lets pack our things

The desert never bothered us anyway

It’s funny how some distance

makes Egyptians all seems small and the masters that controlled us can’t get to us at all

It’s time to see what we can do

The power of a people who’ve broken through

Torah v emet the laws for me.

We’re free.

Let us go, let us go.

We are one with the lord

Let us go, let us go.

We hope this Seder didn’t make you bored

So here we’ll sit and here we’ll stay

Let the Seder go on

The Maror never bothers me anyway...

-- Exodus Story

Long ago, Pharaoh ruled the land of Egypt. He enslaved the Jewish people and made them work very hard building his cities.   song: Bang bang bang Phaoraoh was especially cruel to Jewish children. One mother hid her baby, Moses, in a basket in the river. Pharoah's daughter found him and took him home to live in the palace. Moses grew up. He saw the slaves working so hard. He had a fight about it and ran away to be a shepherd. While he was looking after the sheep, he saw a bush on fire that did not burn up and heard God's voice telling him to go back to Egypt, to tell Pharoah to let the Jewish people go.  Song: when Israel was in Egypt land When Moses went to Pharoah, he said "Let my people go". Pharaoh said "No". So, God sent the 1st plague -Blood. Moses went to Pharoah. He said, "Let my people go". Pharaoh said "No". So, God sent the 2nd plague - Frogs. Moses went to Pharoah. He said, "Let my people go". Pharoah said, "No". Song: One morning when Pharoah woke in his bed The 3rd plague was Lice. Moses went to Pharoah. He said, "Let my people go". Pharaoh said, "No". The 4th plague was Wild Beasts. Moses went to Pharoah. He said, "Let my people go". Pharoah said, "No". The 5th plague was Cattle Disease. Moses went to Pharoah. He said, "Let my people go". Pharoah said, "No". The 6th plague was Boils. Moses went to Pharoah. He said "Let my people go". Pharaoh said," No". The 7th plague was Hail stones. Moses went to Pharoah. He said, "Let my people go". Pharoah said, "No". The 8th plague was Locusts. Moses went to Pharoah. He said, "Let my people go". Pharaoh said, "No". The 9th plague was Darkness. Moses went to Pharoah. He said, "Let my people go". Pharoah said, "No". The last plague was Death. Pharoah said "Yes"   song: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10  plagues in Egypt's land The people got ready to leave very quickly, so quickly that their bread didn't have time to rise; it baked into matzah. They walked through the desert to the sea. Pharoah's soldiers chased after them. When they got to the sea, Moses held up his his staff and the sea divided. The Jewish people walked through the sea to freedom and a new future.

-- Exodus Story

Bang bang bang

Bang, bang, bang, hold your hammer low, bang, bang,  bang,  give a heavy blow 

For its work work work every day and every night, for its work work work when it's dark and when it's light

Dig, dig, dig, get your shovel deep, dig, dig, dig, there's no time to sleep

Heave, heave, heave, drag those stones along, heave heave heave for you must be strong

Go down Moses

When Israel was in Egypt's land, let my people go, oppressed so hard they could not stand,LMPG

Go down Moses, way down in Egypt land, tell old Pharoah to let my people go

One morning

One morning when Pharoah woke in his bed, there were frogs in his bed, there were frogs on his head

Frogs on his nose and frogs on his toes, frogs here, frogs there, frogs were jumping everywhere 

-- Ten Plagues
Source : GFrim

Dam - Blood

Tzefarde'ah - Frogs

Kinnim - Lice

Arov - Flies

Dever - Pestilence (sick animals)

Shchin - Boils

Barad - Hail

Arbeh - Locust

Choshech - Darkness

Makat Bechorot - Slaying of the firstborn

-- Ten Plagues

1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10 Plagues in Egypt land (x2) chorus

Blood in the water made the river run red, 10 plagues in Egypt land, Pharaoh shoulda listened to what God said, 10 plagues in Egypt land, chorus

Frogs were jumping in Pharaohs' hair, 10 plagues in Egypt land
Pharaoh didn't like it but the frogs didn't care, 10 plagues in Egypt land, chorus

Creepy, crawly itchy lice, 10 plagues in Egypt land Mess with the holy one, better think twice, 10 plagues in Egypt land chorus

Filthy flies, so dirty and vile, 10 plagues in Egypt land Not exactly Pharaohs' style 10 plagues in Egypt land chorus

Cattle, horses, oxen died, 10 plagues in Egypt land "I won't give up" old Pharaoh cried, 10 plagues in Egypt land chorus

Boils and blisters on his skin, 10 plagues in Egypt land Give up Pharaoh, you're never gonna win, 10 plagues in Egypt land chorus

Hail rained down from the heavens on high, 10 plagues in Egypt land Hurt so much, made Pharaoh cry, 10 plagues in Egypt land chorus

Swarms of locusts ate the crops, 10 plagues in Egypt land Hard hearted Pharaoh just wouldn't stop, 10 plagues in Egypt land chorus

Dark descended in the light of day, 10 plagues in Egypt land Pharaoh was lost, couldn't find his way, 10 plagues in Egypt land chorus

First born, the final blow, 10 plagues in Egypt land Finally Pharaoh let our people go, 10 plagues in Egypt land chorus

What are the plagues of our time?

How can we move together through our 'Red Sea' towards a better future?

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Orginial

We are grateful that we are together on this night as a family ~ Dayenu

We are grateful that we are together to share this moment ~ Dayenu

We are grateful that we are together, alive and healthy ~ Dayenu

We are grateful that we are able to eat together ~ Dayenu

We are grateful that we have a light shining upon us ~ Dayenu

We are grateful for everything and everyone that we have ~ Dayenu

We are grateful for all that has touched our lives ~Dayenu

We are grateful that our ancestors never gave up home, and to them we drink the second glass of wine together ~ Dayenu

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Simon Wood

Ilu ho-tsi, ho-tsi-a-nu,
Ho-tsi-a-nu mi-Mitz-ra-yim,
Ho-tsi-a-nu mi-Mitz-ra-yim,
Da-ye-nu!

.. CHORUS:
.. Dai, da-ye-nu,
.. Dai, da-ye-nu,
.. Dai, da-ye-nu,
.. Da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu!

.. X2

Ilu na-tan, na-tan la-nu,
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-Sha-bat,
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-Sha-bat,
Da-ye-nu!

.. (CHORUS)

Ilu na-tan, na-tan la-nu,
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-To-rah,
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-To-rah,
Da-ye-nu!

.. (CHORUS)

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

בְּכָל־דּוֹר וָדוֹר חַיָּב אָדָם לִרְאוֹת אֶת־עַצְמוֹ, כְּאִלּוּ הוּא יָצָא מִמִּצְרָֽיִם

B’chol dor vador chayav adam lirot et-atzmo, k’ilu hu yatzav mimitzrayim.

In every generation, everyone is obligated to see themselves as though they personally left Egypt.

The seder reminds us that it was not only our ancestors whom God redeemed; God redeemed us too along with them. That’s why the Torah says “God brought us out from there in order to lead us to and give us the land promised to our ancestors.”

---

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who redeemed us and our ancestors from Egypt, enabling us to reach this night and eat matzah and bitter herbs. May we continue to reach future holidays in peace and happiness.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the second glass of wine!

Rachtzah
Source : Traditional

רחצה

Rachtzah

Wash hands while reciting the traditional blessing for washing the hands:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְשָׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָּנוּ עַל נְטִילַת יָדַיִם.

Baruch atah Adonai Eloheinu melech ha-olam, asher kid'shanu b'mitzvotav, v'tzivanu al n'tilat yadayim.

Praised are you, Adonai, Lord our God, Ruler of the universe, who has taught us the way of holiness through commandments, commanding us to wash our hands.

Motzi-Matzah
Source : Original Illustration from Haggadot.com

Motzi-Matzah
Source : JewishBoston.com

The blessing over the meal and matzah | motzi matzah | מוֹצִיא מַצָּה

The familiar hamotzi blessing marks the formal start of the meal. Because we are using matzah instead of bread, we add a blessing celebrating this mitzvah.

בְָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, הַמּוֹצִיא לֶֽחֶם מִן הָאָֽרֶץ:

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, hamotzi lechem min ha-aretz.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who brings bread from the land.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתַָיו וְצִוָּֽנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מַצָּה:

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat matzah.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to eat matzah.

Distribute and eat the top and middle matzah for everyone to eat.

Motzi-Matzah
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

We have now told the story of Passover…but wait! We’re not quite done. There are still some symbols on our seder plate we haven’t talked about yet. Rabban Gamliel would say that whoever didn’t explain the shank bone, matzah, and marror (or bitter herbs) hasn’t done Passover justice.

The shank bone represents the Pesach, the special lamb sacrifice made in the days of the Temple for the Passover holiday. It is called the pesach, from the Hebrew word meaning “to pass over,” because God passed over the houses of our ancestors in Egypt when visiting plagues upon our oppressors.

The matzah reminds us that when our ancestors were finally free to leave Egypt, there was no time to pack or prepare. Our ancestors grabbed whatever dough was made and set out on their journey, letting their dough bake into matzah as they fled.

The bitter herbs provide a visceral reminder of the bitterness of slavery, the life of hard labor our ancestors experienced in Egypt.

Motzi-Matzah

What does the Orange mean to you?

Shulchan Oreich
Source : Original Illustration from Haggadot.com
Shulchan Oreich

Every year at Pesach time, we eat the Matzah and we drink the wine,                   We ask 4 questions, one by one, but before the Seders's done

I'm gonna find it, I'm gonna find it, I'm gonna find it, I'm gonna find it,        Gonna find the afikoman 

We eat Charoset and we dip Karpas, we tell the story of the Exodus,                 the Bitter Herbs they make my eyes go crossed,                                                    but when I find the Afikoman I'm the boss, cos 

I'm gonna find it, I'm gonna find it, I'm gonna find it, I'm gonna find it,        Gonna  find the afikoman

Now you can hide it on a table, hide it in a box, underneath the stairs or inside the kitchen clock. You can put it in your pocket, put it under the TV, but you can't hide the afikoman from me.

Cos everyone knows the Seder's not done, until we taste the Afikoman.        And when I find it I'll articulate the terms on which we shall negotiate.

Cos, I'm gonna find it, I'm gonna find it, I'm gonna find it, I'm gonna find it, Gonna find the afikoman

Tzafun
Source : Original Illustration from Haggadot.com
Bareich

Ve'achalta, v'savarta, u'verachta

We ate when we were hungry and now we're satisfied.
We thank the source of blessing for all that she provides

Oseh Shalom bimromav, hu ya'asey shalom aleynu
V'al kol Yisrael, v'al kol Yoshvey  Tevel

Ya'asey shalom, ya'sey shalom, shalom aleynu v'al kol Yisrael
Ya'asey shalom, ya'sey shalom, shalom aleynu v'al kol Yoshvey Tevel

(May the one who makes peace in the highest, make peace for, for all Israel and for all who live on Earth).

Hallel
Source : http://www.lyricstime.com/shalom-jerusalem-hinei-ma-tov-behold-how-good-lyrics.html
It is traditional at this point in the seder, to sing songs of praise. This is one of my favorites for this event.

Hinei ma tov umanaim

Shevet achim gam yachad

Hinei ma tov umanaim

Shevet achim gam yachad

Behold how good and

How pleasant it is

For brothers to dwell together

Hallel

Fourth Glass of Wine

As we come to the end of the seder, we drink one more glass of wine. With this final cup, we give thanks for the experience of celebrating Passover together, for the traditions that help inform our daily lives and guide our actions and aspirations.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן:

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the fourth and final glass of wine!

Hallel
Source : Machar

Leader:
Let us all refill our cups.

Leader picks up cup for all to see.

This is the cup of hope.

The seder tradition involves pouring a cup for the Hebrew prophet Elijah. For millennia, Jews opened the door for him, inviting him join their seders, hoping that he would bring with him a messiah to save the world.

Yet the tasks of saving the world - once ascribed to prophets, messiahs and gods - must be taken up by us mere mortals, by common people with shared goals. Working together for progressive change,we can bring about the improvement of the world, tiqqun ha-olam - for justice and for peace, we can and we must.

Leader:

Let us now symbolically open the door of our seder to invite in all people of good will and all those in needto work together with us for a better world.Let us raise our fourth cup as we dedicate ourselves to tiqqun olam, the improvement of the world.

Everyone:

"L' Tiqqun Olam!"

All drink the fourth cup.

Nirtzah
Source : Original

Now, we're going to take the wine/juice that we've poured and each add to Elijah's cup.

Now let's do the same from our water glasses to fill Miriam's cup.

Combining our actions together is what will help Elijah come to ourworld.

 We set an extra place for Elijah and we'll open the door and invite him in later. Miriam was Moses's sister and we honor her for how she helped Moses wich made our story possible today.

Nirtzah
Source : Original Illustration from Haggadot.com
Nirtzah

At the conclusion of the Seder, everyone joins in singing:

לְשָׁנָה הַבָּאָה בִּירוּשַָׁלָיִם.

L'shana Haba'ah b'Y’rushalayim

We hope that, by the time we join together at our Seder next year, the world will be a better place for its inhabitants. What can we do to help?