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Introduction
Source : Design by Haggadot.com

Introduction
Source : Machar

The Passover Seder is one of the most important celebrations on the Jewish cultural calendar.
It provides a setting of family love and unity in which all Jews can rededicate themselves to the ideal of human freedom and growth.

The ritual of the occasion involves the use of certain symbolic foods:

P'RI HA-GAPHEN - "the fruit of the vine" - wine or grape juice
MATSAH - unleavened bread
MAROR - a bitter herb (horseradish, green onion, or romaine lettuce)
KARPAS - parsley or celery
Z'ROA - an animal bone or a beet (for vegetarians)
BEITSAH - an egg, hard-boiled then roasted
TAPPUZ - an orange (a recent addition)
HAROSET - a condiment made from fruits, nuts, spices, and wine 

Introduction
Source : Machar
Leader:

We have come together this evening for many reasons. We are here because Spring is all around, the Earth is reborn, and it is a good time to celebrate with family and friends. We are here because we are Jews, because we are members of the Jewish nation, with its deep historic roots and its valuable old memories and stories.

We are here to remember the old story of the liberation of the ancient Hebrews from slavery in Egypt - a great struggle for freedom and dignity. We are here because the struggle for human freedom never stops. We are here to remember all people - Jews and non-Jews - who are still struggling for their freedom.

As we feel how wonderful and important it is for diverse peoples to come together, let us recite and then sing the words of HINNEH MAH TOV. 

HINNEH, MAH TOV - BEHOLD, HOW GOOD! (Adaptation* of T'hillim / Psalms 133.1)    

Behold, how good and how pleasant it is when peoples* dwell together in unity!

Hinneh, mah tov u-mah naim shevet ammim* gam yahad! 

(*originally "brothers", or "achim")

Introduction

[To the tune of "Take Me Out to the Ballgame"]

Take me out to the Seder

Take me out with the crowd.

Feed me on Matzah and chicken legs,

I don't care for the hard-boiled eggs.

And it's root, root, root for Elijah

That he will soon reappear

And let's hope, hope, hope that we'll meet

Once again next year!

Take me out to the Seder

Take me out with the crowd.

Read the Haggadah

And don't skip a word. 

Please hold your talking,

We want to be heard.

And let's root, root, root for the leader

That he will finish his speil

So we can nosh, nosh, nosh and by-gosh

Once again next year!

Kadesh

All Jewish celebrations, from holidays to weddings, include wine as a symbol of our joy – not to mention a practical way to increase that joy. The seder starts with wine and then gives us three more opportunities to refill our cup and drink.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, שֶׁהֶחֱיָנוּ וְקִיְּמָנוּ וְהִגִּיעָנוּ לַזְּמַן הַזֶּה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, she-hechiyanu v’key’manu v’higiyanu lazman hazeh.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who has kept us alive, raised us up, and brought us to this happy moment.

Drink the first glass of wine!

Kadesh
Source : Alan Scher, http://velveteenrabbi.com/VRHaggadah.pdf

The four cups of wine represent the four promises of liberation God makes in the Torah:

I will bring you out,
I will deliver you,
I will redeem you,
I will take you to be my people (Exodus 6:6-7.)

The four promises, in turn, have been interpreted as four stages on the path of liberation:

  1. becoming aware of oppression
  2. opposing oppression 
  3. imagining alternatives
  4. and accepting responsibility to act
Karpas
Source : Adapted from Jewishboston.com
Passover combines the celebration of an event from Jewish memory with a recognition of the cycles of nature. As we remember the liberation from Egypt, we also recognize the stirrings of spring and rebirth happening in the world around us. The symbols on our table bring together elements of both kinds of celebration.

We now take a vegetable, in this case parsely, to represent our joy at the dawning of spring after our long, cold winter. Whatever symbol of spring and sustenance we’re using, we now dip it into salt water, a symbol of the tears our ancestors shed as slaves. Before we eat it, we recite a short blessing:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הָאֲדָמָה Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree ha-adama. We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruits of the earth.

We look forward to spring and the reawakening of flowers and greenery. They haven’t been lost, just buried beneath the snow, getting ready for reappearance just when we most needed them.

We all have aspects of ourselves that sometimes get buried under the stresses of our busy lives. What has this winter taught us? What elements of our own lives do we hope to revive this spring?

Yachatz
Source : Alida Lederman, JewishBoston.com

Breaking the Matzah

There are three pieces of matzah stacked on the table. We now break the middle matzah into two pieces. The host should wrap up the larger of the pieces and, at some point between now and the end of dinner, hide it. This piece is called the afikomen, literally "dessert." After dinner, the guests will have to hunt for the afikomen.

Uncover and hold up the three pieces of matzah and say:

Reader 1: Ha lachma anya—this is the bread of affliction. At the seder we begin as slaves. We eat matzah, the bread of affliction, which leaves us hungry and longing for redemption. We eat matzah in memory of the quick flight of our ancestors from Egypt. As slaves, they had faced many false starts before finally being let go. So when the word of their freedom came, they took whatever dough they had and ran with it before it had the chance to rise, leaving it looking something like matzah.

It reminds us of a time when we couldn’t control what food was available to us, but ate what we could out of necessity.
The matzah enables us to taste slavery— to imagine what it means to be denied our right to live free and healthy lives.

But, while we will soon enjoy a large meal and end the seder night as free people, millions of people around the world can not leave the affliction of hunger behind. Let us awaken to their cries and declare:

Kol dichfin yeitei v’yeichol—let all who are hungry, come and eat. As we sit at our seder and contemplate our people’s transition from slavery to freedom, let us hope for a time when all who are hungry and enslaved will eat as free people.

Hashata avdei—this year we are still slaves.
Leshanah haba’ah b’nei chorin—next year we will be free people.

Maggid - Beginning
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

Pour the second glass of wine for everyone.

The Haggadah doesn’t tell the story of Passover in a linear fashion. We don’t hear of Moses being found by the daughter of Pharaoh – actually, we don’t hear much of Moses at all. Instead, we get an impressionistic collection of songs, images, and stories of both the Exodus from Egypt and from Passover celebrations through the centuries. Some say that minimizing the role of Moses keeps us focused on the miracles God performed for us. Others insist that we keep the focus on the role that every member of the community has in bringing about positive change.

-- Four Questions
Source : Original Illustration from Haggadot.com
-- Four Questions

Asking questions is a core tradition in Jewish life.
If everyone at your seder is around the same age, perhaps the person with the least seder experience can ask them – or everyone can sing them all together.

Why is this night different from all other nights?

1. Why, on this night celebrating our freedom, do we insist on the eating of the bread of slavery?

On all other nights we eat bread and matzah but on this night only matzah. Eating matzah reminds us that the Jews fled Egypt in such haste that their bread did not have time to rise, resulting in matzah. On this night, more than any other night, we must remember that we can never be truly free until all people everywhere can share in our freedom. 

2. Why on this night celebrating our freedom, do we eat these bitter herbs?

On all other nights we eat all vegetables but on this night only bitter herbs. The bitter herbs remind us of the bitterness of slavery in Egypt. These bitter herbs are combined with charoset which symbolizes the mortar the Jews used to make buildings while they were enslaved. On this night, more than any other night, we must remember the past to ensure that we are not trapped in the complacency of the present. 

3. Why do we dip the herbs twice tonight, first in salt water and then in sweet charoset ?

The salt water into which we dip bitter herbs represents the tears we cried while in Egypt. On this night, more than any other night, we must recognize that there are people everywhere whose tears still drench their food. Then we dip again in the  charoset  to represent not only the mortar that our ancestors once used in Egypt, but also the mortar that we must all use to build a better world. By dipping twice we declare that it is not enough to recognize the tears of others, but that we must take real steps to build a sweeter world for them.

4. Why on this night do we recline?

We commemorate our freedom by reclining on cushions in comfort and relaxation!

Ma nishtanah halailah hazeh mikol haleilot?
Mikol haleilot?

Sheb’khol haleilot anu okhlin, hametz umatzah?
Hametz umatzah?
Halailah hazeh, ​halailah hazeh, kuloh umatzah.

Sheb’khol haleilot anu okhlin, sh’ar y’rakot?
Sh’ar y’rakot?
Halailah hazeh, halailah hazeh, maror.

Sheb’khol haleilot ein anu matbilin, afilu pa’am ehat?
Afilu pa’am ehat?
Halailah hazeh, halailah hazeh, shtei f’amim.

Sheb’khol haleilot anu okhlin, bein yoshvin uvein m’subin?
Bein yoshvin uvein m’subin? 
Halailah hazeh, halalilah hazeh, kulanu m’subin.

-- Four Children
Source : ajws.org

At Passover, we are confronted with the stories of our ancestors’ pursuit of liberation from oppression. Facing this mirror of history, how do we answer their challenge? How do we answer our children when they ask us how to pursue justice in our time?

What does the Activist Child ask?

“The Torah tells me, ‘Justice, justice shall you pursue,’ but how can I pursue justice?”

Empower him always to seek pathways to advocate for the vulnerable. As Proverbs teaches, “Speak up for the mute, for the rights of the unfortunate. Speak up, judge righteously, champion the poor and the needy.”

What does the Skeptical Child ask?

“How can I solve problems of such enormity?”

Encourage her by explaining that she need not solve the problems, she must only do what she is capable of doing. As we read in Pirke Avot, “It is not your responsibility to complete the work, but neither are you free to desist from it.”

What does the Indifferent Child say?

“It’s not my responsibility.”

Persuade him that responsibility cannot be shirked. As Abraham Joshua Heschel writes, “The opposite of good is not evil, the opposite of good is indifference. In a free society where terrible wrongs exist, some are guilty, but all are responsible.”

And the Uninformed Child who does not know how to ask…

Prompt her to see herself as an inheritor of our people’s legacy. As it says in Deuteronomy, “You must befriend the stranger, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt.”

At this season of liberation, join us in working for the liberation of all people. Let us respond to our children’s questions with action and justice.



 

-- Exodus Story
Source : CSJO: Congress of Secular Jewish Organization

The story of the Exodus has been told to us by our parents, just as their parents told them. We now repeat the story in hopes that this will pass on to the next generation.

The ancient Hebrews came to Egypt from their land to get provisions during a famine. They became a favored group in Egypt and prospered and multiplied there. Legend tells us that our ancestor Joseph, who was sold into slavery by his brothers, became valuable to Pharaoh for his foresight and wisdom. Because of this, his people were welcomed. When new rulers came to power, the Hebrews fell out of favor and were enslaved. Despite their hardships, the Hebrew people survived and grew in numbers. The new Pharaoh became concerned that they would unite with Egypt's enemies.

At one point the Pharaoh ordered that all newborn male babies be killed. The parents of one boy were determined to save their child and they made a basket so the baby would float in the water.

The baby’s sister, Miriam, took the basket to the river. While she hid nearby, she floated the basket downstream so that her brother would be discovered by the Pharaoh's daughter who bathed there every day.

When the Pharaoh's daughter saw the baby in the water she decided to save him and raise him as her own son. While wondering who would be his wet nurse, Miriam appeared and suggested Yocheved, the baby's mother. The Pharaoh's daughter agreed and decided that she would call him Moses, because the name means "I brought him from the river's water."

Many years passed and this man named Moses, who had been brought up as an Egyptian prince, saw an overseer brutally whipping an enslaved Hebrew. This so enraged him, that he struck the overseer and killed him. Moses fled to nearby Midian where he became a shepherd and married Zipporah.

His was a tranquil life, but the thought of the persecuted Hebrews in Egypt would not let Moses rest. The legend tells us that an angel appeared to Moses in a miraculously burning bush and commanded him to return to Egypt and help his people regain their freedom.

After much indecision, Moses finally went back to Egypt and he and his brother Aaron began to talk to the Hebrews in order to arouse a spirit of rebellion in them. Many were, at first, hesitant and afraid, but soon they became convinced of the justice of their cause and agreed to follow Moses's plan of liberation. Moses pleaded with the Pharaoh to let his people go. The Pharaoh refused to let the Hebrews go free. Tradition tells us that ten plagues then struck the land of Egypt.

-- Exodus Story

The night is so dark

and I am afraid.

I see nothing, smell nothing,

the only reality—

I am holding my mother’s hand.

And as we walk

I hear the sounds

of a multitude in motion—

in front, behind,

all around,

a multitude in motion.

I have no thought of tomorrow,

now, in the darkness,

there is only motion

and my mother’s hand.

© Merle Feld, Finding Words, URJ Press 2011

-- Ten Plagues
Source : Machar

Leader:
Let us all refill our cups.

[Take turns reading. Each person is invited to read a grouped set of lines - or to pass.]

Tonight we drink four cups of the fruit of the vine.
There are many explanations for this custom.
They may be seen as symbols of various things:
the four corners of the earth, for freedom must live everywhere;
the four seasons of the year, for freedom's cycle must last through all the seasons;
or the four matriarchs: Sarah, Rebecca, Leah, and Rachel.

A full cup of wine symbolizes complete happiness.
The triumph of Passover is diminished by the sacrifice of many human lives
when ten plagues were visited upon the people of Egypt.
In the story, the plagues that befell the Egyptians resulted from the decisions of tyrants,
but the greatest suffering occurred among those who had no choice but to follow.

It is fitting that we mourn their loss of life, and express our sorrow over their suffering.
For as Jews and as Humanists we cannot take joy in the suffering of others.
Therefore, let us diminish the wine in our cups
as we recall the ten plagues that befell the Egyptian people.

Leader:

As we recite the name of each plague, in English and then in Hebrew,
please dip a finger in your wine and then touch your plate to remove the drop.

Everyone:

Blood - Dam (Dahm)
Frogs - Ts'phardea (Ts'phar-DEH-ah)
Gnats - Kinim (Kih-NEEM)
Flies - Arov (Ah-ROV)
Cattle Disease - Dever (DEH-vehr)
Boils - Sh'hin (Sh'-KHEEN)
Hail - Barad (Bah-RAHD)
Locusts - `Arbeh (Ar-BEH)
Darkness - Hoshekh (KHO-shekh)
Death of the Firstborn - Makkat B'khorot (Ma-katB'kho-ROT) 

[Take turns reading. Each person is invited to read a grouped set of lines - or to pass.]

In the same spirit, our celebration today also is shadowed
by our awareness of continuing sorrow and oppression in all parts of the world.
Ancient plagues are mirrored in modern tragedies.

In our own time, as in ancient Egypt, ordinary people suffer and die
as a result of the actions of the tyrants who rule over them.
While we may rejoice in the defeat of tyrants in our own time,
we must also express our sorrow at the suffering of the many innocent people
who had little or no choice but to follow.

Leader:

As the pain of others diminishes our joys,
let us once more diminish the ceremonial drink of our festival
as we together recite the names of these modern plagues:

Hunger
War
Tyranny
Greed
Bigotry
Injustice
Poverty
Ignorance
Pollution of the Earth Indifference to Suffering

Leader:
Let us sing a song expressing our hope for a better world. 

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

We have now told the story of Passover…but wait! We’re not quite done. There are still some symbols on our seder plate we haven’t talked about yet. Rabban Gamliel would say that whoever didn’t explain the shank bone, matzah, and marror (or bitter herbs) hasn’t done Passover justice.

The shank bone represents the Pesach, the special lamb sacrifice made in the days of the Temple for the Passover holiday. It is called the pesach, from the Hebrew word meaning “to pass over,” because God passed over the houses of our ancestors in Egypt when visiting plagues upon our oppressors.

The matzah reminds us that when our ancestors were finally free to leave Egypt, there was no time to pack or prepare. Our ancestors grabbed whatever dough was made and set out on their journey, letting their dough bake into matzah as they fled.

The bitter herbs provide a visceral reminder of the bitterness of slavery, the life of hard labor our ancestors experienced in Egypt.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Machar

Dedicated To The Struggle For Peace And Freedom

The second cup of wine is dedicated
not only to the struggles of the Jewish people,
but to all people seeking a secure life free of fear and persecution.
We hope and work particularly for the Israelis and the Palestinians
that they may all learn to live together in freedom and peace.

Let us strive to fulfill the words of the prophet Micah:
"They shall beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning hooks.
Nation shall not take up sword against nation, they shall never again know war.
But they shall sit every one under their vines and fig trees,
and none shall make them afraid" (Micah 4.3-4).

Leader:

Let us all raise our glasses in a toast to peace and freedom for all.
P'ri ha-gaphen - `itto, nishteh
"L'-Shalom u-l'-Herut!" 

Everyone:

The fruit of the vine - with it, let us drink
"To Peace and Freedom!" 

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Brandi Ullian

Singing "Dayenu" is a much-loved tradition at the Passover Seder. We recognize all the things that God gave the Israelites throughout their exodus and journey in the desert, and respond with the phrase "Dayenu," meaning "it would have been enough." But even those who don't believe in a supernatural God can still sing "Dayenu". "Dayenu" is a song about appreciating what we have and what we’ve been given. It is easy to get lost in the great lists of things we don’t have and the demands we are always fighting for. However, we should take stock of what we do have and appreciate those gifts, because it's possible we could have much less or nothing at all. If I had only one pair of shoes and not two, dayenu! If I had a tiny apartment and not a house, dayenu! If I had a only two meals a day and not three, dayenu! The traditional "Dayenu" recounts everything the Israelites were thankful for as they left Egypt.

Each guest reads a sentence and the whole group responds, DAYENU!
Afterwords the three verses below are sung by all.

Had we been taken out of Egypt and not had judgment executed upon the Egyptians, it would've been enough.
Had judgment been executed upon the Egyptians and not upon their idols, it would've been enough.
Had judgment been executed upon their idols, and not their firstborn, it would've been enough.
Had judgment been executed upon their firstborn, and we had not received their wealth, it would've been enough.
Had we received their wealth, and not had the sea split for us, it would've been enough.
Had the sea been split the sea for us, and we had not been led through it to dry land, it would've been enough.
Had we been led to dry land, and our enemies not drowned in the sea behind us, it would've been enough.
Had our enemies drowned, and our needs not have been provided for in the desert for 40 years, it would've been enough. Had we been supported in the desert and not been given bread, it would have been enough.
Had we been given bread and not been given the Sabbath, it would have been enough.
Had we been given the Sabbath and not been brought to Mount Sinai, it would have been enough.
Had we been brought to Mount Sinai and not been sent the Torah, it would have been enough.
Had we been sent the Torah and not been brought to Israel, it would have been enough.
Had we been brought to Israel and not been built the Holy Temple, it would have been enough.

Dayenu

Ilu ho-tsi, ho-tsi-a-nu,
Ho-tsi-anu mi-Mitz-ra-yim
Ho-tsi-anu mi-Mitz-ra-yim Da-ye-nu!
Had we not been taken out of Egypt, it would've been enough!

CHORUS:
Da-da-ye-nu,
Da-da-ye-nu,
Da-da-ye-nu,
Da-da-ye-nu,
Da-ye-nu Da-ye-nu

Ilu na-tan, na-tan la-nu,
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-Sha-bat,
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-Sha-bat,
Da-ye-nu!
Had we not been given the Sabbath, it would have been enough!

CHORUS

Ilu na-tan, na-tan la-nu,
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-To-rah,
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-To-rah,
Da-ye-nu!
Had we not been sent the Torah, it would have been enough!

CHORUS

Motzi-Matzah
Source : JewishBoston.com

The blessing over the meal and matzah | motzi matzah | מוֹצִיא מַצָּה

The familiar hamotzi blessing marks the formal start of the meal. Because we are using matzah instead of bread, we add a blessing celebrating this mitzvah.

בְָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, הַמּוֹצִיא לֶֽחֶם מִן הָאָֽרֶץ:

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, hamotzi lechem min ha-aretz.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who brings bread from the land.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתַָיו וְצִוָּֽנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מַצָּה:

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat matzah.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to eat matzah.

Distribute and eat the top and middle matzah for everyone to eat.

Maror
Source : JewishBoston.com

Dipping the bitter herb in sweet charoset | maror  |מָרוֹר   

  In creating a holiday about the joy of freedom, we turn the story of our bitter history into a sweet celebration. We recognize this by dipping our bitter herbs into the sweet charoset. We don’t totally eradicate the taste of the bitter with the taste of the sweet… but doesn’t the sweet mean more when it’s layered over the bitterness?

ברוּךְ אַתָּה יְיַָ אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָּֽנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מרוֹר:

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat maror.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to eat bitter herbs.

Maror
Source : Original

Dipping the bitter herb in sweet charoset |  maror   |מָרוֹר   

We recognize that even though we are so grateful for our journeys toward liberation, and that we experience so much joy through the process of freeing ourselves, there are also many parts of the journey that are difficult and unpleasant.

We acknowledge the mixture of pleasant and unpleasant experiences by mixing bitter and sweet flavors as we eat the maror with charoset.

ברוּךְ אַתָּה יְיַָ אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָּֽנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מרוֹר:

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat maror.

Koreich

The charoset reminds us of the mortar and of the pain of slavery. However, as we eat it we taste it’s sweetness. This sweetness gives us hope that the future will bring redemption and justice to all people.

We make sandwiches out of maror and charoset, to remind us of the mortar our ancestors used to construct huge monuments for Pharaoh in Egypt.

As you we eat this sandwich, we consider the signs of hope for a more just future that can be seen in your community. And use this sandwich as sustenance for the work ahead.

Tzafun
by VBS
Source : Valley Beth Shalom Haggadah

 -At this time in our festive meal, we recline more fully, we share our stories more openly, and we affirm our identities as a newly freed people. We have found the Afikoman and continue this gathering with celebration andsong. There re-united piece of matzah that makes our meal complete is the symbol of wholeness we feel in retelling the story of our people’s liberation. We now find ourselves more complete than when we started.

-Family has gathered, new friendships have been forged, and we must continue to tell our own story within the great narrative of the Jewish people. We are a part of the telling, our story today is as alive and important as the generations before us. We share this piece of matzah now and renew our promise to find wholeness in the world around us.

Tzafun
Source : JewishBoston.com

Finding and eating the Afikomen | tzafoon | צָפוּן

The playfulness of finding the afikomen reminds us that we balance our solemn memories of slavery with a joyous celebration of freedom. As we eat the afikomen, our last taste of matzah for the evening, we are grateful for moments of silliness and happiness in our lives.

Bareich
Source : Machar

Leader:
Let us all refill our cups.

[Take turns reading. Each person is invited to read a grouped set of lines - or to pass.]

During this festival of life, let us remember our lost sisters and brothers - the millions of Jews enslaved and killed in the Holocaust. We remember them along with all the others who suffered.

They were all parts of the rainbow - of ethnic, religious and sexual minorities, of progressive activists, resistance fighters, and people with disabilities. Their anguish and death is with us, even in our times of celebration.

We resolve that their memory shall not be lost. We accept the responsibility of working to prevent such suffering from ever again occurring on this earth.

We remember the heroism of those who fought against fascism and tyranny in the forests and the cities of Europe.Men, women, and children who loved freedom and humanity struggled with their own hands against the powerful armies of those who sought to oppress and kill them.

We remember the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising on the dawn of the first day of Passover, April 19, 1943.  The Nazis were coming to complete the deportation of the remaining Jews to the death camps.

A shot rang out on Nalevki Street, signaling the beginning of this Jewish revolt. A few hundred Jews with a few guns and hand grenades had decided to resist the tremendous power of the German army and the Gestapo. The courageous men and women of the Jewish Fighting Organization held out for forty-two days.

Although few of the Jewish fighters survived the battle, the story of their courage will never die. Similar acts of resistance took place in Minsk, Vilna, Bialystock, in the cities and towns of Poland, and even in the death camps - Treblinka, Sobibor, Auschwitz. 

Leader:

We were slaves in Egypt and we were slaves in fascist Europe. We have much to remember.
Let us raise our glasses to those who were taken from us and to those who fought for freedom and life. 

P'ri ha-gaphen-`itto,nishteh "L'-Haiyim!"   

Everyone:

"L'- Haiyim!" 

Hallel
Source : JewishBoston.com

The Cup of Elijah

We now refill our wine glasses one last time and open the front door to invite the prophet Elijah to join our seder.

In the Bible, Elijah was a fierce defender of God to a disbelieving people. At the end of his life, rather than dying, he was whisked away to heaven. Tradition holds that he will return in advance of messianic days to herald a new era of peace, so we set a place for Elijah at many joyous, hopeful Jewish occasions, such as a baby’s bris and the Passover seder.

אֵלִיָּֽהוּ הַנָּבִיא, אֵלִיָּֽהוּ הַתִּשְׁבִּי,

אֵלִיָּֽהוּ, אֵלִיָּֽהוּ,אֵלִיָּֽהוּ הַגִּלְעָדִי.

בִּמְהֵרָה בְיָמֵֽנוּ יָבוֹא אֵלֵֽינוּ

עִם מָשִֽׁיחַ בֶּן דָּוִד, 

עִם מָשִֽׁיחַ בֶּן דָּוִד.

Eliyahu hanavi Eliyahu hatishbi Eliyahu, Eliyahu, Eliyahu hagiladi Bimheirah b’yameinu, yavo eileinu Im mashiach ben-David, Im mashiach ben-David

Elijah the prophet, the returning, the man of Gilad: return to us speedily, in our days with the messiah, son of David.

Hallel
Source : JewishBoston.com

Singing songs that praise God | hallel | הַלֵּל

This is the time set aside for singing. Some of us might sing traditional prayers from the Book of Psalms. Others take this moment for favorites like Chad Gadya & Who Knows One, which you can find in the appendix. To celebrate the theme of freedom, we might sing songs from the civil rights movement. Or perhaps your crazy Uncle Frank has some parody lyrics about Passover to the tunes from a musical. We’re at least three glasses of wine into the night, so just roll with it.

Fourth Glass of Wine

As we come to the end of the seder, we drink one more glass of wine. With this final cup, we give thanks for the experience of celebrating Passover together, for the traditions that help inform our daily lives and guide our actions and aspirations.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן:

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the fourth and final glass of wine! 

Nirtzah
Source : Machar

Leader:
[Announces the name of the child or children who found the `aphiqoman.]
Let us continue our seder by eating one last little piece of matsah to leave us with the taste of freedom's struggles.

[Everyone eat a last piece of matsah.]

Now, let us conclude our seder.

Everyone:

We have recalled struggles against slavery and injustice.
We have sung of freedom and peace.
We revisited times of persecution and times of fulfillment.
Only half a century ago, Nazis committed the crimes of the Holocaust.
Today, as Jews in the United States, we are more free than at any other time.

Yet Jewish history shows that life is ever-changing,
and we must learn how to survive under all conditions.
When we are persecuted, we must struggle for our own freedom.
The more freedom we attain,
the more we must help others attain freedom.

This is the lesson of Passover. This is why we celebrate the Festival of Freedom. 

Conclusion
by Jenny
Source : Schlock Rock
Who Knows One?

1.  Who knows one?  I know one!

One is Hashem, one is Hashem, one is Hashem!

In the Heaven and the Earth

אחד אלוהינו שבשמיים ובארץ

2.  Who knows two?  I know two!

Two are the tablets that Moses brought, 

and one is Hashem, etc...

שני לוחות הברית

3.  Who knows three?  I know three!

Three are the fathers,

and two are the tablets that Moses brought,

and one is Hashem, etc.

שלושה אבות

4.  Who knows four?  I know four!

Four are the Mothers, 

and three are the fathers,

and two are the tablets that Moses brought, 

and one is Hashem.....

ארבע אימהות

5.  Who knows five?  I know five!

Five are the books of the *clap* Torah, 

Four are the mothers, and three are the fathers

and two are the tablets that Moses brought,

and one is Hashem...

חמישה חומשי תורה

6.  Who knows six?  I know six!

Six are the books of the *clap* Mishnah,

and five are the books of the *clap* Torah,

and four are the mothers and three are the fathers

and two are the tablets that Moses brought,

and one is Hashem...

שישה סידרי משנה

7.  Who knows seven?  I know seven!

Seven are the days of the week *clap, clap*,

Six are the books of the *clap* Mishnah,

and five are the books of the *clap* Torah,

and four are the mothers and three are the fathers

and two are the tablets that Moses brought,

and one is Hashem...

שיבעה ימי שבתא

8.  Who knows eight?  I know eight!

Eight are the days til the Brit Milah

Seven are the days of the week *clap, clap*,

Six are the books of the *clap* Mishnah,

and five are the books of the *clap* Torah,

and four are the mothers and three are the fathers

and two are the tablets that Moses brought,

and one is Hashem...

שמונה ימי מילה

9.  Who knows nine?  I know nine!

Nine are the months til the baby's born

Eight are the days til the Brit Milah

Seven are the days of the week *clap, clap*,

Six are the books of the *clap* Mishnah,

and five are the books of the *clap* Torah,

and four are the mothers and three are the fathers

and two are the tablets that Moses brought,

and one is Hashem...

תישעה ירחי לידה

10.  Who know ten?  I know ten!

Ten are the Ten Commandments

Nine are the months til the baby's born

Eight are the days til the Brit Milah

Seven are the days of the week *clap, clap*,

Six are the books of the *clap* Mishnah,

and five are the books of the *clap* Torah,

and four are the mothers and three are the fathers

and two are the tablets that Moses brought,

and one is Hashem...

עשרה דיבריא

11.  Who knows eleven?  I know eleven!

Eleven are the stars in Joseph's dream

Ten are the Ten Commandments

Nine are the months til the baby's born

Eight are the days til the Brit Milah

Seven are the days of the week *clap, clap*,

Six are the books of the *clap* Mishnah,

and five are the books of the *clap* Torah,

and four are the mothers and three are the fathers

and two are the tablets that Moses brought,

and one is Hashem...

אחד עשר כוכביא

.יא

12.  Who knows twelve?  I know twelve!

Twelve are the tribes of Israel

Eleven are the stars in Joseph's dream

Ten are the Ten Commandments

Nine are the months til the baby's born

Eight are the days til the Brit Milah

Seven are the days of the week *clap, clap*,

Six are the books of the *clap* Mishnah,

and five are the books of the *clap* Torah,

and four are the mothers and three are the fathers

and two are the tablets that Moses brought,

and one is Hashem...

שנים עשר שיבטיא

.יב

Songs
Source : JewishBoston.com

Chad Gadya

חַד גַּדְיָא, חַד גַּדְיָא

דְזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי,

חַד גַּדְיָא, חַד גַּדְיָא.

Chad gadya, chad gadya

Dizabin abah bitrei zuzei

Chad gadya, chad gadya.

One little goat, one little goat:

Which my father brought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The cat came and ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The dog came and bit the cat

That ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The stick came and beat the dog

That bit the cat that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The fire came and burned the stick

That beat the dog that bit the cat

That ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The water came and extinguished the

Fire that burned the stick

That beat the dog that bit the cat

That ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The ox came and drank the water

That extinguished the fire

That burned the stick that beat the dog That bit the cat that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The butcher came and killed the ox,

That drank the water

That extinguished the fire

That burned the stick that beat the dog That bit the cat that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The angle of death came and slew

The butcher who killed the ox,

That drank the water

That extinguished the fire

That burned the stick that beat the dog That bit the cat that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

One little goat, one little goat:

The Holy One, Blessed Be He came and

Smote the angle of death who slew

The butcher who killed the ox,

That drank the water

That extinguished the fire

That burned the stick that beat the dog That bit the cat that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.