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Introduction

Have you searched for leaven in your home? Have you put the finishing touches on delicious dishes? It's time to stop planning for the Pesach Seder and to start experiencing its joy, its inspiration, its challenge and its beauty.  Every year the same story merges with our own lives and our experiences. This year is no different. We are as important to the Seder as the haggadah, the karpas and the salt water. We, gathered in small or great numbers, are what make the Passover Seder awe inspiring. We are more sacred than written words, stories and blessings.  Pesach, Passover, comes each year to see what we have learned about being human beings in God's very complicated and beautiful world. 

Stop preparing for Pesach now. Get comfortable in your cushioned seat, awaken childlike curiosity in your heart along with an apetite in your belly and immerse yourself in an evening like no other. Ma nishtanah halailah hazeh? Why is this night different? That will become abundantly clear as you explore the acts, themes and questions of tonight's Seder. 

Introduction
by VBS
Source : VBS Haggadah
The first words in the creation of the universe out of the unformed, void and dark earth were God’s “Let there be light." Therein lies the hope and faith of Judaism and the obligation of our people: to make the light of justice, compassion, and knowledge penetrate the darkness of our time till the prophecy be fulfilled, ‘that wickedness vanish like smoke and the earth shall be filled with knowledge of God as the waters cover the sea’ (Isaiah 11:9). 

Baruch atah Adonai Elohaynoo melech ha-olam, asher keedshanoo b’meetzvotav v’tzeevanoo l’hadleek ner shel yom tov.

Praised are You, Lord our God, Whose presence fills the universe, Who has sanctified our lives through Your commandments and commanded us to kindle the festival lights. 

Baruch ata Adonai, Elohaynoo melech ha-olam, sheh’hech’eeyanoo v’keeyemanoo, v’heegeeanoo la-z’man ha-zeh.

Praised are You, Lord our God, Whose presence fills the universe, Who has given us life and strength and enabled us to reach this moment of joy. 

Introduction

Our Passover meal is called a seder, which means “order” in Hebrew, because we go through specific steps as we retell the story of our ancestors’ liberation from slavery. Some people like to begin their seder by reciting or singing the names of the 14 steps—this will help you keep track of how far away the meal is!

Introduction
Source : The New Union Haggadah

Shabbat Candles

May the festival lights we now kindle,

Inspire us to use our powers

To heal and not to harm,

To help and not to hinder,

To bless and not to curse,

To serve You, O God of freedom.

Kadesh

סַבְרִי מָרָנָן וְרַבָּנָן וְרַבּוֹתַי

Everyone, my intent is to sing praises.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָפֶן.

Blessed are You, Adonai our God, Ruler of the universe, Creator of the fruit of the vine.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר בָּחַר בָּנוּ מִכָּל עָם וְרוֹמְמָנוּ מִכָּל לָשׁוֹן וְקִדְּשָׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו. וַתִּתֶּן לָנוּ יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ בְּאַהֲבָה מוֹעֲדִים לְשִׂמְחָה, חַגִּים וּזְמַנִּים לְשָׂשׂוֹן, אֶת יוֹם חַג הַמַצוֹת הַזֶה, זְמַן חֵרוּתֵנוּ, מִקְרָא קֹדֶשׁ, זֵכֶר לִיצִיאַת מִצְרָיִם. כִּי בָנוּ בָחַרְתָּ וְאוֹתָנוּ קִדַּשְׁתָּ מִכָּל הָעַמִּים, וּמוֹעֲדֵי קָדְשֶךָ בְּשִׂמְחָה וּבְשָׂשׂוֹן הִנְחַלְתָּנוּ. בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי, מְקַדֵּשׁ יִשְׂרָאֵל וְהַזְּמַנִּים

Blessed are You, Adonai our God, Ruler of the Universe, who chose use among all peoples and exalted us among all tongues, and sanctified us with Your commandments. And You gave us, Adonai our God, in love, festivals for happiness, holidays and special times for joy, and this day of the Festival of Matzah, the season of our freedom, a holy convocation, a remembrance of the Exodus from Egypt. For You have chosen us and sanctified us among all peoples, and holy festivals and with happiness and joy, You have bestowed upon us. Blessed are You, Adonai our God, who sanctifies Israel and sacred times.

Kadesh
Source : Open Doors Haggadah
Candle Blessings

Urchatz
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com
Water is refreshing, cleansing, and clear, so it’s easy to understand why so many cultures and religions use water for symbolic purification. We will wash our hands twice during our seder: now, with no blessing, to get us ready for the rituals to come; and then again later, we’ll wash again with a blessing, preparing us for the meal, which Judaism thinks of as a ritual in itself. (The Jewish obsession with food is older than you thought!)

To wash your hands, you don’t need soap, but you do need a cup to pour water over your hands. Pour water on each of your hands three times, alternating between your hands. If the people around your table don’t want to get up to walk all the way over to the sink, you could pass a pitcher and a bowl around so everyone can wash at their seats… just be careful not to spill!

Too often during our daily lives we don’t stop and take the moment to prepare for whatever it is we’re about to do.

Let's pause to consider what we hope to get out of our evening together tonight. Go around the table and share one hope or expectation you have for tonight's seder.

Karpas
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

Passover, like many of our holidays, combines the celebration of an event from our Jewish memory with a recognition of the cycles of nature. As we remember the liberation from Egypt, we also recognize the stirrings of spring and rebirth happening in the world around us. The symbols on our table bring together elements of both kinds of celebration.

We now take a vegetable, representing our joy at the dawning of spring after our long, cold winter. Most families use a green vegetable, such as parsley or celery, but some families from Eastern Europe have a tradition of using a boiled potato since greens were hard to come by at Passover time. Whatever symbol of spring and sustenance we’re using, we now dip it into salt water, a symbol of the tears our ancestors shed as slaves. Before we eat it, we recite a short blessing:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הָאֲדָמָה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree ha-adama.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruits of the earth.

We look forward to spring and the reawakening of flowers and greenery. They haven’t been lost, just buried beneath the snow, getting ready for reappearance just when we most needed them.

-

We all have aspects of ourselves that sometimes get buried under the stresses of our busy lives. What has this winter taught us? What elements of our own lives do we hope to revive this spring?

Yachatz
Source : Rabbi Ron Li-Paz

Our Seder is experiential. It isn't enough to read about our journey from slavery to freedom. Instead we must touch it. We must taste its bitterness and ultimately, its sweetness. Each symbol tries pulls us closer to what our people, our extended family of ancestors, went through. It moves us from  their story to ours.

Now break the middle matzah, place th larger portion, the afikoman, in a napkin to be hidden. (Now the game begins. The afikoman can be hidden at any time). The smaller portion of the broken matzah will be eaten with the top matzah when we start our meal.

Yachatz, the breaking of the matzah, can be seen to represent the brokenness of the world of slavery and oppression. That's the starting point of our story. 

Uncover and hold up the three pieces of matzah and say:

This is the bread of poverty which our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt. All who are hungry, come and eat; all who are needy, come and celebrate Passover with us. This year we are here; next year we will be in Israel. This year we are slaves; next year we will be free.

Yachatz

Raise the tray with Matzhas and recite:

הָא לַחְמָא עַנְיָא דִי אֲכָלוּ אַבְהָתָנָא בְּאַרְעָא דְמִצְרָיִם. כָּל דִכְפִין יֵיתֵי וְיֵיכֹל, כָּל דִצְרִיךְ יֵיתֵי וְיִפְסַח. הָשַׁתָּא הָכָא, לְשָׁנָה הַבָּאָה בְּאַרְעָא דְיִשְׂרָאֵל. הָשַׁתָּא עַבְדֵי, לְשָׁנָה הַבָּאָה בְּנֵי חוֹרִין

Ha lachma anya dee achalu avhatana b'ara d'meetzrayeem. Kol deechfeen yeitei v'yeichol, kol deetzreech yeitei v'yeefsach. Hashata hacha, l'shanah haba-ah b'ara d'yisra-el. Hashata avdei, l'shanah haba-ah b'nei choreen.

This is the bread of affliction, which our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt. Let all who are hungry come and eat. Let all who are in need, come and share the Pesach meal. This year, we are here. Next year, in the land of Israel. This year, we are slaves. Next year, we will be free.

In this paragraph, we remember the oppression of our ancestors, and by that obligate ourselves to face the oppression of others. As we recline and recall our ancestors’ movement from oppression to freedom, may we feel the obligation that comes with it. May we open our hearts and our homes to the need around us, and turn to create redemption in our own day.

Maggid - Beginning
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

Pour the second glass of wine for everyone.

The Haggadah doesn’t tell the story of Passover in a linear fashion. We don’t hear of Moses being found by the daughter of Pharaoh – actually, we don’t hear much of Moses at all. Instead, we get an impressionistic collection of songs, images, and stories of both the Exodus from Egypt and from Passover celebrations through the centuries. Some say that minimizing the role of Moses keeps us focused on the miracles God performed for us. Others insist that we keep the focus on the role that every member of the community has in bringing about positive change.

-- Four Questions
Source : JewishBoston.com

The formal telling of the story of Passover is framed as a discussion with lots of questions and answers. The tradition that the youngest person asks the questions reflects the centrality of involving everyone in the seder. The rabbis who created the set format for the seder gave us the Four Questions to help break the ice in case no one had their own questions. Asking questions is a core tradition in Jewish life. If everyone at your seder is around the same age, perhaps the person with the least seder experience can ask them – or everyone can sing them all together.

מַה נִּשְׁתַּנָּה הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה מִכָּל הַלֵּילות

Ma nishtana halaila hazeh mikol haleilot?

Why is this night different from all other nights?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכלין חָמֵץ וּמַצָּה  הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה כֻּלּוֹ מצה  

Shebichol haleilot anu ochlin chameitz u-matzah. Halaila hazeh kulo matzah.

On all other nights we eat both leavened bread and matzah.
Tonight we only eat matzah.

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכְלִין שְׁאָר יְרָקוֹת הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה מָרוֹר

Shebichol haleilot anu ochlin shi’ar yirakot haleila hazeh maror.

On all other nights we eat all kinds of vegetables,
but tonight we eat bitter herbs.

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אֵין אָֽנוּ מַטְבִּילִין אֲפִילוּ פַּֽעַם אחָת  הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה שְׁתֵּי פְעמים

Shebichol haleilot ain anu matbilin afilu pa-am echat. Halaila hazeh shtei fi-amim.

On all other nights we aren’t expected to dip our vegetables one time.
Tonight we do it twice.

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכְלִין בֵּין יוֹשְׁבִין וּבֵין מְסֻבִּין.  :הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה כֻּלָּֽנוּ מְסֻבין

Shebichol haleilot anu ochlin bein yoshvin uvein m’subin. Halaila hazeh kulanu m’subin.

On all other nights we eat either sitting normally or reclining.
Tonight we recline.

-- Four Questions
Source : Lab/Shul Sayder

Mah Nishtana: What's New? What significant change has occurred in your life since this time last year? Name one meaningful piece of news. ​Elijah's Cup is passed around as each guest speaks. A blessing or toast concludes the round. Avadim Hayinu: Our Slavery. Identify the problem. What enslaves you today? What's holding you back from being freer, happy, and creative? ​Use a blank note of paper - on one side write HOW AM I FREE and on the other side write HOW AM I NOT FREE Dayenu: Enough. Identify possible solutions. What can you do to help end your enslavement and reduce that which holds you back from more freedom and creativity? What will help you fight the Pharaohs within? ​This round can be about personal or societal slavery and oppressions. L'shana Ha'baa: Future Vision - Next Year. We can't end the seder till we all commit to making the world a better place, with less oppression and more freedom. What is your vision of a freer world? What do you commit to in the coming year to help reduce slavery and oppression in the world? ​This can be discussed over dessert!

-- Four Questions
-- Four Children
Source : Rabbi Ron Li-Paz

Each of us approaches the holiday of Passover from a different vantage point. We have different life experiences, perspectives, questions and answers. Does freedom have the same meaning for a Russian immigrant that it does for an American-born adult or child?  How does each person end the phrase, "I am free from...?" How does each of us relate to "God took us out of Egypt with a mighty and outstretched hand?" The rabbis realize these differences and express them through the faces and experiences of children. One child is typically wise. One is often wicked. One is simple and straightforward, and one is at a loss for words. We can choose to look for these children of all ages around our table or we can look within and see these aspects of ourselves. Is any one of us consistently wise, wicked, simple or silent? Are we not must-faceted and beautifully complex?

When the usually wise "child" asks, what are the laws that God commanded you...?

You can teach this child about the beauty and richness of Passover laws and traditions. He or she wants clarity and deeper understanding.

When the often wicked "child" asks, what does this service mean to you?

You might notice that he or she is removing himself or herself from the experience! To you and not to himself or herself! This child is quick to see the lessons that other people need to learn and slow to see him or herself as the object of the experience. Say, “It is because of what God did for me in taking me out of Egypt.” It’s simple: Gratitude and wonder. Alternatively, listen to this child's question differently: What does this service mean to you (who seem to be engaging in it and enjoying it? If I knew, I too might fit into this experience and not draw away from it).

The simple and straightforward "child" might ask, what is this?

To this child, answer clearly: “With a strong hand God took us out of Egypt, where we were slaves.” We, you and I, are part of an incredible story of slavery, freedom, God’s hand in human history, and our responsibility is to lead generous, positively impactful lives. We who once were enslaved are now free to help liberate others from their enslavement. 

The "child" who is at a loss for words will probably not ask a question, so be aware of his or her silence and find ways to engage this child with love and respect. Help this child to ask questions by letting him or her know that the greatest contribution that he or she might add to the Seder is that “wrong” or “foolish” question that the child is wanting to ask.

You might say, “It is because of what God did for me in taking me out of Egypt.” You could add that Passover is a child's holiday which means that curiosity, questioning and play are at the center of the experience.

-- Exodus Story

וְהִיא שֶׁעָמְדָה

v'hi she'amda

This promise has stood

לַאֲבוֹתֵיֽנוּ וְלָנֽוּ

l'avoteinu v'lanu

for our fathers and for us

שֶׁלֹא אֶחָד בִּלְבָד

shelo echad bilvad

For not just one alone

עָמַד עָלֵיֽנוּ לְכַלּוֹתֵנֽוּ

amad aleinu l'chaloteinu

stood against us.

אֶלָּא שֶׁבְּכָל דּוֹר וָדוֹר

ela sheb'chol dor vador

But in every generation

לְכַלּוֹתֵנֽוּ עוֹמְדִים עָלֵיֽנוּ 

omdim aleinu l'chaloteinu

there have been periods in which they have stood against us

וְהַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא

v'hakadosh baruch hu

and The Holy One Blessed be He

מַצִּילֵנוּ מִיָּדָם

matzileinu miyadam

kept saving us from their hands.

-- Exodus Story
Source : Rabbi Ron Li-Paz

In the introduction to our Seder, we said that each of us must bring ourselves, our lives, our experiences and our wisdom to the table. It isn't enough to read the story of our ancestors. We need to contibute our questions and our insights.

Haggadah means The Telling. Not the reading. Maggid means The Storyteller. Not the reader. So what is your Passover story? How do you connect your own life and experience to the story of Moses, Pharaoh, Miriam, slavery, oppression, freedom, and the very human ability to overcome obstacles and even to overthrow tyranny?

The longest Seder is the one that doesn't engage us. You won't regret taking the time to talk and to listen. Not just to read and sing.

-- Ten Plagues
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

As we rejoice at our deliverance from slavery, we acknowledge that our freedom was hard-earned. We regret that our freedom came at the cost of the Egyptians’ suffering, for we are all human beings made in the image of God. We pour out a drop of wine for each of the plagues as we recite them.

Dip a finger or a spoon into your wine glass for a drop for each plague.

These are the ten plagues which God brought down on the Egyptians:

Blood | dam | דָּם

Frogs | tzfardeiya |  צְפַרְדֵּֽעַ

Lice | kinim | כִּנִּים

Beasts | arov | עָרוֹב

Cattle disease | dever | דֶּֽבֶר

Boils | sh’chin | שְׁחִין

Hail | barad | בָּרָד

Locusts | arbeh | אַרְבֶּה

Darkness | choshech | חֹֽשֶׁךְ

Death of the Firstborn | makat b’chorot | מַכַּת בְּכוֹרוֹת

The Egyptians needed ten plagues because after each one they were able to come up with excuses and explanations rather than change their behavior. Could we be making the same mistakes? Make up your own list. What are the plagues in your life? What are the plagues in our world today? What behaviors do we need to change to fix them? 

-- Ten Plagues

Sin, plagues, curses and blight! These are ancient words that no longer have usage in our lexicon. We don't sin! We err. We don't suffer curses! We have bad luck. And blight? Plague? These are weather patterns and anomalies in nature. They have nothing to do with us and our actions!

Passover doesn't just demand that we see ourselves, each and every one of us as if we were slaves and as if God redeemed us with signs, miracles and an outstretched arm millenia ago. It demands that we look with open eyes and clear vision at our modern world and its ills. It demands that we see ourselves in the world and recognize our own actions and their impact.

God brought plagues upon the ancient Egyptians. What plagues have we brought upon our own world, our nation, and even our homes? What patterns can we change? What harm can we undo?

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

We have now told the story of Passover…but wait! We’re not quite done. There are still some symbols on our seder plate we haven’t talked about yet. Rabban Gamliel would say that whoever didn’t explain the shank bone, matzah, and marror (or bitter herbs) hasn’t done Passover justice.

The shank bone represents the Pesach, the special lamb sacrifice made in the days of the Temple for the Passover holiday. It is called the pesach, from the Hebrew word meaning “to pass over,” because God passed over the houses of our ancestors in Egypt when visiting plagues upon our oppressors.

The matzah reminds us that when our ancestors were finally free to leave Egypt, there was no time to pack or prepare. Our ancestors grabbed whatever dough was made and set out on their journey, letting their dough bake into matzah as they fled.

The bitter herbs provide a visceral reminder of the bitterness of slavery, the life of hard labor our ancestors experienced in Egypt.

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

בְּכָל דּוֹר וָדוֹר חַיָב אָדָם לִרְאוֹת אֶת עַצְמוֹ כְּאִלוּ הוּא יֶָָצֶָא מִמִּצְרַָים , שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר: וְהִגַּדְתָּ לְבִנְךָ בַּיוֹם הַהוּא לֵאמֹר, בַּעֲבוּר זֶה עָשָׂה יי לִי בְּצֵאתִי מִמִּצְרַים . לֹא אֶת אֲבוֹתֵינוּ בִּלְבָד גָּאַל הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא, אֶלָּא אַף אוֹתָנוּ גָּאַל עִמָּהֶם, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר: וְאוֹתָנוּ הוֹצִיא מִשָׁם , לְמַעַן הָבִיא אֹתָנוּ, לָתֶת לָנוּ אֶת הָאָרֶץ אֲשֶׁר נִשָׁבַּע לַאֲבֹתֵנוּ.

B’chol dor vador chayav adam lirot et atzmo k’ilu hu yatza mimitzrayim, shene’emar: v’higadta l’vincha bayom hahu leimor, ba’avur zeh asah Adonai li b’tzeiti mimitzrayim. Lo et avoteinu bilvad ga’al hakadosh baruch hu, ela af otanu ga’al imahem, shene’emar: v’otanu hotzi misham, l’ma’an havi otanu, latet lanu et ha’aretz asher nishba la’avoteinu.

Participant:

In every generation every one of us is obligated to regard ourselves as though we had gone through Mitzrayim. As it is said, "And you shall tell your child in that day, saying these words, "Because of what the Eternal did for me in bringing me out of Mitzrayim. " Thus, it was not our ancestors alone whom the Holy One, blessed be He, redeemed, but He also redeemed us with them. As it is said, "He brought us forth from there in order to bring us in, that He might give us the land which He swore unto our ancestors."

WINE CUPS ARE RAISED AND WE READ TOGETHER:

Therefore we are obligated, to thank, sing the Hallel, praise, glorify, exalt, honor, bless, elevate and raise our voices for joy to the Holy One, Blessed be He, Who performed all these miracles for our ancestors and for us! He brought us from human bondage to freedom, from sorrow to joy, from a time of mourning to a festive day, from deep darkness to great light and from slavery to redemption! In Your presence we renew our singing as in ancient days: Hallel-lu-yah Sing Hallel to G-d!

WINE CUPS ARE LOWERED

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Rabbi Ron Li-Paz

B’chol dor vador chayav adam lirot et-atzmo, k’ilu hu yatzav mimitzrayim.

“In every generation, every person is obligated to see him or herself as though he or she personally left Egypt.”

The seder reminds us that it was not only our ancestors whom God redeemed; God redeemed us too along with them. We are not separate and apart from that redemption. We cannot view it as someone else’s story – as someone else’s challenge or someone else's blessing. Equally, we cannot view the obligations of freedom as someone else’s obligations. We, who were once enslaved, are free and responsible for improving the lives of others, regardless of their religion, race or nationality.

We raise the second cup of wine:

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who redeemed us and our ancestors from Egypt, enabling us to reach this night and eat matzah and bitter herbs. May we continue to reach future holidays in peace and happiness.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the second glass of wine!

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Dayenu

The plagues and our subsequent redemption from Egypt are but one example of the care God has shown for us in our history. Had God but done any one of these kindnesses, it would have been enough – dayeinu.
Rachtzah
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

As we now transition from the formal telling of the Passover story to the celebratory meal, we once again wash our hands to prepare ourselves. In Judaism, a good meal together with friends and family is itself a sacred act, so we prepare for it just as we prepared for our holiday ritual, recalling the way ancient priests once prepared for service in the Temple.

Some people distinguish between washing to prepare for prayer and washing to prepare for food by changing the way they pour water on their hands. For washing before food, pour water three times on your right hand and then three times on your left hand.

After you have poured the water over your hands, recite this short blessing.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו, וְצִוָּנוּ  עַל נְטִילַת יָדָֽיִם

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al n’tilat yadayim.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to wash our hands.

Motzi-Matzah
Source : JewishBoston.com

The blessing over the meal and matzah | motzi matzah | מוֹצִיא מַצָּה

The familiar hamotzi blessing marks the formal start of the meal. Because we are using matzah instead of bread, we add a blessing celebrating this mitzvah.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, הַמּוֹצִיא לֶֽחֶם מִן הָאָֽרֶץ

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, hamotzi lechem min ha-aretz.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who brings bread from the land.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתַָיו וְצִוָּֽנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מַצָּה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat matzah.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to eat matzah.

Distribute and eat the top and middle matzah for everyone to eat.

Maror
Source : JewishBoston.com

Dipping the bitter herb in sweet charoset | maror  |מָרוֹר   

  In creating a holiday about the joy of freedom, we turn the story of our bitter history into a sweet celebration. We recognize this by dipping our bitter herbs into the sweet charoset. We don’t totally eradicate the taste of the bitter with the taste of the sweet… but doesn’t the sweet mean more when it’s layered over the bitterness?

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ מֶֽלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָֽׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָּֽנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מרוֹר

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’tzivanu al achilat maror.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who made us holy through obligations, commanding us to eat bitter herbs.

Koreich
Source : JewishBoston.com

Eating a sandwich of matzah and bitter herb | koreich | כּוֹרֵךְ

When the Temple stood in Jerusalem, the biggest ritual of them all was eating the lamb offered as the pesach or Passover sacrifice. The great sage Hillel would put the meat in a sandwich made of matzah, along with some of the bitter herbs. While we do not make sacrifices any more – and, in fact, some Jews have a custom of purposely avoiding lamb during the seder so that it is not mistaken as a sacrifice – we honor this custom by eating a sandwich of the remaining matzah and bitter herbs. Some people will also include charoset in the sandwich to remind us that God’s kindness helped relieve the bitterness of slavery.

Shulchan Oreich
Source : JewishBoston.com

Eating the meal! | shulchan oreich | שֻׁלְחָן עוֹרֵךְ

Enjoy! But don’t forget when you’re done we’ve got a little more seder to go, including the final two cups of wine!

Tzafun
Source : Rabbi Ron Li-Paz

Finding and eating the Afikomen |   tzafoon  | צָפוּן

The afikoman (meaning dessert in Greek) was hidden. Now hopefully, it has been found. If not, the Seder cannot go on! Tradition has it that we "buy" back the afikoman from the child (or adult?) that finds it. If we don't have a child at our Seder table, perhaps we can reward children by making a Passover donation in support of Jewish education. 

We fill the third glass of wine.

Bareich

Refill everyone’s wine glass.

We traditionally would now say grace after the meal, thanking God for the food we’ve eaten. Here's a (very) shortened version:

May all be fed, may all be nourished, and may all be loved.

May the source of peace grant peace to us, to the Jewish people, and to the entire world. Amen.

The Third Glass of Wine

The blessing over the meal is immediately followed by another blessing over the wine:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the third glass of wine!

Bareich
Source : urj.org
Birkat Hamazon

 

Hallel
Source : JewishBoston.com

The Cup of Elijah

We now refill our wine glasses one last time and open the front door to invite the prophet Elijah to join our seder.

In the Bible, Elijah was a fierce defender of God to a disbelieving people. At the end of his life, rather than dying, he was whisked away to heaven. Tradition holds that he will return in advance of messianic days to herald a new era of peace, so we set a place for Elijah at many joyous, hopeful Jewish occasions, such as a baby’s bris and the Passover seder.

אֵלִיָּֽהוּ הַנָּבִיא, אֵלִיָּֽהוּ הַתִּשְׁבִּיאֵלִיָּֽהוּ, אֵלִיָּֽהוּ,אֵלִיָּֽהוּ הַגִּלְעָדִי

בִּמְהֵרָה בְיָמֵֽנוּ יָבוֹא אֵלֵֽינוּ

עִם מָשִֽׁיחַ בֶּן דָּוִד

עִם מָשִֽׁיחַ בֶּן דָּוִד

Eliyahu hanavi
Eliyahu hatishbi
Eliyahu, Eliyahu, Eliyahu hagiladi
Bimheirah b’yameinu, yavo eileinu
Im mashiach ben-David,
Im mashiach ben-David

Elijah the prophet, the returning, the man of Gilad:
return to us speedily,
in our days with the messiah,
son of David.

Hallel

As we come to the end of the seder, we drink one more glass of wine. With this final cup, we give thanks for the experience of celebrating Passover together, for the traditions that help inform our daily lives and guide our actions and aspirations.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the fourth and final glass of wine! 

Nirtzah
Source : The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

Nirtzah  marks the conclusion of the seder. Our bellies are full, we have had several glasses of wine, we have told stories and sung songs, and now it is time for the evening to come to a close. At the end of the seder, we honor the tradition of declaring, “Next year in Jerusalem!”

For some people, the recitation of this phrase expresses the anticipation of rebuilding the Temple in Jerusalem and the return of the Messiah. For others, it is an affirmation of hope and of connectedness with  Klal Yisrael, the whole of the Jewish community. Still others yearn for peace in Israel and for all those living in the Diaspora.

Though it comes at the end of the seder, this moment also marks a beginning. We are beginning the next season with a renewed awareness of the freedoms we enjoy and the obstacles we must still confront. We are looking forward to the time that we gather together again. Having retold stories of the Jewish people, recalled historic movements of liberation, and reflected on the struggles people still face for freedom and equality, we are ready to embark on a year that we hope will bring positive change in the world and freedom to people everywhere.

In  The Leader's Guide to the Family Participation Haggadah: A Different Night, Rabbi David Hartman writes: “Passover is the night for reckless dreams; for visions about what a human being can be, what society can be, what people can be, what history may become.”

What can  we  do to fulfill our reckless dreams? What will be our legacy for future generations?

Our seder is over, according to Jewish tradition and law. As we had the pleasure to gather for a seder this year, we hope to once again have the opportunity in the years to come. We pray that God brings health and healing to Israel and all the people of the world, especially those impacted by natural tragedy and war. As we say…

לְשָׁנָה הַבָּאָה בִּירוּשָׁלָֽיִם

L’shana haba-ah biy’rushalayim

NEXT YEAR IN JERUSALEM!

Conclusion
Source : THE ANONYMOUS HAGGADAH

AVADIM

HAYINU

WE WERE SLAVES

The Answer is simple and we keep it simple. 


1. We weren't just overdoing things a little, we were slaves! And we were powerless.

It took the power of the Omnipotent Almighty to extract us from there. Which he

did with a mighty hand and an outstretched arm. So severely were we addicted to

our own slavery and shame that if Hashem had not taken our forbearers out of

Egypt then we would still be hopelessly enmeshed in that sickness and slavery.

We, ourselves and our children would be without Recovery. And such is the

nature of this disease that we must constantly treat it by talking about it. It doesn't

matter whether we are clever, intuitive, experienced or whether we know the

whole program backwards, whether we can recite the Big Book by heart. We are

still commanded to share with others our Recovery. And the more meetings we

attend the more praiseworthy we will be.  


2. The metaphor of the strong hand and the outstretched arm refers to the substance

or activity to which we were addicted. The strong hand as explained later at

greater length, is the cessation of using or acting out our addiction. This is the first

and most difficult step to take.  


3. The outstretched arm refers to the gradual separation and the distance we put

between ourselves and the paraphernalia of addiction. The putting away of

people, places, and things.  

 


MAASEH - A STORY 

The five Rabbis mentioned in this story were all in Recovery.  

Rabbi Eliezer was wont to say, 

   

"Live and let live," Don't be too quick to anger," "Stay sober today before you die" and

"Bask in the glow of the wise but beware lest you get too close and burn yourself". 

 

He, of course, had trouble in all these aspects of his personality. He argued with his

friends, tried to impress his will upon them, stubbornly refused to accept the majority

ruling, rationalized his disrespect of them and ended up excommunicated by them, totally

isolated.  


Rabbi Yehoshua was wont to say,  "Self-will run riot, the tendency to misanthropy, isolation and depression will kill a

person". 

 

He knew whereof he spoke.  Rabbi Elazar ben Azaria was wont to say,  

"One who talks the talk without walking the walk is like a big tree with lots of leaves but

no roots. The first strong wind to blow will uproot it and throw it on it's face. He who

walks the walk more than he talks the talk is like a tree with few leaves but lots of roots.

All the ill winds in the universe won't move it from it's place. (But it doesn't provide

much shade.)" 

 

Rabbi Akiva was a recovering Jew hater. Up to the age of 40 his anger at religious Jews

was murderous and fanatical. It was the unconditional love of his friend, later his wife

Rachel, which restored him to sanity, and the patience of his gentle teacher Nachum IshGamzu

which turned this bellicose, belligerent ignoramus into an intellectual giant.

He retained his tendency to militancy all his life, allowed his vision to be clouded by his desires,

made political blunders, 24,000 of his disciples died of 'disrespect', and he was arrested,

imprisoned and martyred by the Romans.

 

Rabbi Tarphon was an obsessive compulsive with a tendency to get bogged down in

detail and minutiae. Once at night on a dangerous stretch of road frequented by footpads

and cutthroats, he lay on the ground in order to recite the Sh'ma according to the ruling of

Shammai. Boasting of the danger he had braved, his friends told him he needed help.

They warned him that what he was doing was not religious but compulsive and if he died

he wouldn't be a martyr, just another O.D. [overdose]. He was wont to say, "You aren't

responsible for the results but you must put in the foot work. You don't even have to

finish what you're doing, just don't stop".  

These then are the Rabbis who sat all night talking about the EXODUS and their own

Recovery. Careful examination of the text reveals a superfluous word.  

Instead of saying "all that night" it could have read "all night" the Hebrew word for 'that'

means Him, each spoke for himself, and so they passed the whole night away until their

disciples came and said, "Surely, Rabbis, by now you're all cured? Enough already".  

REB ELAZAR BEN AZARIA 

Rabbi Elazar said, "I am like seventy years old". Various reasons are proposed to explain

the way he looked. He was after all only 16 or 18 years old at the time he is quoted in this

Mishna. Rambam (Maimonedes) suggests Reb Elazar destroyed his physical health with

compulsive study of the Torah. Grueling stretches of non-stop study, indifferent nutrition,

appalling conditions, insufficient rest and recreation...all of which accelerated the aging

process.  

Others claim it was a miracle! When he was appointed to head the Academy at this early

age, he was granted instant distinction as all his hair turned white overnight.  

Or perhaps it was simply his response to being loaded with heavy responsibilities at such

a young age. Whatever the reason, Reb Elazar said, "Even though I look the way I do I

couldn't convince the sages that talking about the Recovery from Egypt is mandatory at

night as well as during the day. When Ben Zoma introduced his exegesis of the verse,

etc.”  We of course avoid projecting our legislation onto post-Messianic era. We take one day

at a time, one night at a time and so the ruling has been accepted. We say the Sh'ma at

night, according to Ben Zoma.  

BORUCH HAMAKOM 

In this paragraph we bless and thank Hashem, but we refer to Him as "HAMAKOM" i.e.

"The PLACE". Hashem is the Lord of People, Places and Things. 

First, we bless Him for being there when we need Him and giving us somewhere

else to be instead of that place Egypt. 

Second, we bless Him for being Hashem and giving us Himself instead of those

people and gods of the Egyptians.  

Third, we bless Him for giving us what we need to replace all the destructive

addictive things in our lives, we thank Him for giving us the Torah, our program

to live by on a daily basis. And then again, we thank Him for being Him. 

Commentary / Readings

i Thank You God for most this amazing

by e.e. cummings

i thank You God for most this amazing

day: for the leaping greenly spirits of trees

and a blue true dream of sky; and for everything

which is natural which is infinite which is yes

(i who have died am alive again today,

and this is the sun's birthday; this is the birth

day of life and of love and wings: and of the gay

great happening illimitably earth)

how should tasting touching hearing seeing

breathing any--lifted from the no

of all nothing--human merely being

doubt unimaginable You?

(now the ears of my ears awake and

now the eyes of my eyes are opened)

Commentary / Readings
Source : various

to the tune of “Hey Jude”

Hey, Jews, don’t be afraid.

You were made to Escape Mitzrayim.

In Sinai, the Lord will help you to live

And He will give you all some mayim.

Hey, Jews, it’s time to start.

God will part all The Red Sea waters.

Remember, pack matzah and be real brave.

God’s gonna save your sons and daughters.

The Lord will free you from your pain,

The whip, the chain. Have faith,

and you’ll all be happy later.

Hey, Jews, your tales from days of old will all be told

By all your descendants at their seder.

Da da da da da Da da da da.

Hey, Jews, don’t be afraid.

You were made to

Escape Mitzrayim. I

n Sinai, the Lord will help you to live

And He will give you all some mayim

Mayim, mayim, mayim, mayim, mayim, mayim, wooow!

Da da da da da da da Da da da da

Hey, Jews

Etc.

Songs

חַד גַּדְיָא,חַד גַּדְיָא
דְּזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי, חַד גַּדְיָא,חַד גַּדְיָא.

וְאָתָא שׁוּנְרָא וְאַָכְלָה לְגַדְיָא, דְּזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי, חַד גַּדְיָא,חַד גַּדְיָא.

וְאָתָא כַלְבָּא וְנָשַׁךְ לְשׁוּנְרָא, דְּאַָכְלָה לְגַדְיָא, דְּזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי, חַד גַּדְיָא,חַד גַּדְיָא.

וְאָתָא חוּטְרָא והִכָּה לְכַלְבָּא, דְּנָשַׁךְ לְשׁוּנְרָא, דְּאַָכְלָה לְגַדְיָא, דְּזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי, חַד גַּדְיָא,חַד גַּדְיָא.

וְאָתָא נוּרָא וְשָׂרַף לְחוּטְרָא, דְּהִכָּה לְכַלְבָּא, דְּנָשַׁךְ לְשׁוּנְרָא, דְּאַָכְלָה לְגַדְיָא, דְּזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי, חַד גַּדְיָא, חַד גַּדְיָא.

וְאָתָא מַיָא וְכָבָה לְנוּרָא, דְּשָׂרַף לְחוּטְרָא, דְּהִכָּה לְכַלְבָּא, דְּנָשַׁךְ לְשׁוּנְרָא, דְּאַָכְלָה לְגַדְיָא, דְּזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי, חַד גַּדְיָא,חַד גַּדְיָא.

וְאָתָא תוֹרָא וְשָׁתָה לְמַיָא, דְּכָבָה לְנוּרָא, דְּשָׂרַף לְחוּטְרָא, דְּהִכָּה לְכַלְבָּא, דְּנָשַׁךְ לְשׁוּנְרָא, דְּאַָכְלָה לְגַדְיָא, דְּזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי, חַד גַּדְיָא,חַד גַּדְיָא.

וְאָתָא הַשׁוֹחֵט וְשָׁחַט לְתוֹרָא, דְּשָּׁתָה לְמַיָא, דְּכָבָה לְנוּרָא, דְּשָׂרַף לְחוּטְרָא, דְּהִכָּה לְכַלְבָּא, דְּנָשַׁךְ לְשׁוּנְרָא, דְּאַָכְלָה לְגַדְיָא, דְּזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי, חַד גַּדְיָא,חַד גַּדְיָא.

וְאָתָא מַלְאָךְ הַמָּוֶת וְשָׁחַט לְשׁוֹחֵט, דְּשָׁחַט לְתוֹרָא, דְּשָּׁתָה לְמַיָא, דְּכָבָה לְנוּרָא, דְּשָׂרַף לְחוּטְרָא, דְּהִכָּה לְכַלְבָּא, דְּנָשַׁךְ לְשׁוּנְרָא, דְּאַָכְלָה לְגַדְיָא, דְּזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי, חַד גַּדְיָא, חַד גַּדְיָא.

וְאָתָא הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא וְשָׁחַט לְמַלְאַךְ הַמָּוֶת, דְּשָׁחַט לְשׁוֹחֵט, דְּשָׁחַט לְתוֹרָא, דְּשָּׁתָה לְמַיָא, דְּכָבָה לְנוּרָא, דְּשָׂרַף לְחוּטְרָא, דְּהִכָּה לְכַלְבָּא, דְּנָשַׁךְ לְשׁוּנְרָא, דְּאַָכְלָה לְגַדְיָא,
דְּזַבִּין אַבָּא בִּתְרֵי זוּזֵי, חַד גַּדְיָא,חַד גַּדְיָא.

Chad gadya, chad gadya.

D’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.

V’ata shunra v’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.

V’ata chalba v’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.

V’ata chutra v’hika l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.

V’ata nura v’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.

V’ata maya v’chava l’nura,

d’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.

V’ata tora v’shatah l’maya,

d’chava l’nura,

d’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.

V’ata hashocheit v’shachat l’tora,

d’shata l’maya,

d’chava l’nura,

d’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.

V’ata malach hamavet v’shachat l’shocheit,

d’shachat l’tora,

d’shata l’maya,

d’chava l’nura,

d’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.

V’ata Hakodesh Baruch Hu v’shachat l’malach hamavet,

d’shachat l’shocheit,

d’shachat l’tora,

d’shata l’maya,

d’chava l’nura,

d’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.

Translation:

One little goat, one little goat that my father bought for two zuzim.
A cat came and ate the goat that my father bought for two zuzim. One little goat, one little goat.
A dog came and bit the cat that ate the goat that my father bought for two zuzim. One little goat, one little goat.
A stick came and hit the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat that my father bought for two zuzim. One little goat, one little goat.
A fire came and burned the stick that bit the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat that my father bought for two zuzim. One little goat, one little goat.
Water​ came and put out the fire that burned the stick that bit the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat that my father bought for two zuzim. One little goat, one little goat.
An ox came and drank the water that put out the fire that burned the stick that bit the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat that my father bought for two zuzim. One little goat, one little goat.
A butcher came and slaughter​​​​​​ed the ox that drank the water that put out the fire that burned the stick that bit the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat that my father bought for two zuzim. One little goat, one little goat.
The angel of death came and slaughter​​​​​​ed the butcher who slaughter​​​​​​ed the ox that drank the water that put out the fire that burned the stick that bit the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat that my father bought for two zuzim. One little goat, one little goat.
Then the Holy One, Blessed be He, came and slaughter​​​​​​ed the angel of death who slaughter​​​​​​ed the butcher who slaughter​​​​​​ed the ox that drank the water that put out the fire that burned the stick that bit the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat that my father bought for two zuzim. One little goat, one little goat.

Trans​lation by Eve Levavi.

Songs

אֶחָד מִי יוֹדֵעַ

אֶחָד מִי יוֹדֵעַ? אֶחָד אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ. אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ.

שְׁנַיִם מִי יוֹדֵעַ? שְׁנַיִם אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ. שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ.

שְׁלשָׁה מִי יוֹדֵעַ? שְׁלשָׁה אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ.

אַרְבַּע מִי יוֹדֵעַ? אַרְבַּע אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: אַרְבַּע אִמָהוֹת, שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ.

חֲמִשָׁה מִי יוֹדֵעַ? חֲמִשָׁה אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: חֲמִשָׁה חוּמְשֵׁי תוֹרָה, אַרְבַּע אִמָהוֹת, שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ.

שִׁשָּׁה מִי יוֹדֵעַ? שִׁשָּׁה אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: שִׁשָּׁה סִדְרֵי מִשְׁנָה, חֲמִשָׁה חוּמְשֵׁי תוֹרָה, אַרְבַּע אִמָהוֹת, שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ.

שִׁבְעָה מִי יוֹדֵעַ? שִׁבְעָה אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: שִׁבְעָה יְמֵי שַׁבָּתָא, שִׁשָּׁה סִדְרֵי מִשְׁנָה, חֲמִשָׁה חוּמְשֵׁי תוֹרָה, אַרְבַּע אִמָהוֹת, שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ.

שְׁמוֹנָה מִי יוֹדֵעַ? שְׁמוֹנָה אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: שְׁמוֹנָ

יְמֵי מִילָה, שִׁבְעָה יְמֵי שַׁבָּתָא, שִׁשָּׁה סִדְרֵי מִשְׁנָה, חֲמִשָׁה חוּמְשֵׁי תוֹרָה, אַרְבַּע אִמָהוֹת, שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ.

תִּשְׁעָה מִי יוֹדֵעַ? תִּשְׁעָה אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: תִּשְׁעָה יַרְחֵי לֵדָה, שְׁמוֹנָה יְמֵי מִילָה, שִׁבְעָה יְמֵי שַׁבָּתָא, שִׁשָּׁה סִדְרֵי מִשְׁנָה, חֲמִשָׁה חוּמְשֵׁי תוֹרָה, אַרְבַּע אִמָהוֹת, שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ.

עֲשָׂרָה מִי יוֹדֵעַ? עֲשָׂרָה אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: עֲשָׂרָה דִבְּרַיָא, תִּשְׁעָה יַרְחֵי לֵדָה, שְׁמוֹנָה יְמֵי מִילָה, שִׁבְעָה יְמֵי שַׁבָּתָא, שִׁשָּׁה סִדְרֵי מִשְׁנָה, חֲמִשָׁה חוּמְשֵׁי תוֹרָה, אַרְבַּע אִמָהוֹת, שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ.

אַחַד עָשָׂר מִי יוֹדֵעַ? אַחַד עָשָׂר אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: אַחַד עָשָׂר כּוֹכְבַיָּא, עֲשָׂרָה דִבְּרַיָא, תִּשְׁעָה יַרְחֵי לֵדָה, שְׁמוֹנָה יְמֵי מִילָה, שִׁבְעָה יְמֵי שַׁבָּתָא, שִׁשָּׁה סִדְרֵי מִשְׁנָה, חֲמִשָׁה חוּמְשֵׁי תוֹרָה, אַרְבַּע אִמָהוֹת, שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ.

שְׁנֵים עָשָׂר מִי יוֹדֵעַ? שְׁנֵים עָשָׂר אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: שְׁנֵים עָשָׂר שִׁבְטַיָא, אַחַד עָשָׂר כּוֹכְבַיָּא, עֲשָׂרָה דִבְּרַיָא, תִּשְׁעָה יַרְחֵי לֵדָה, שְׁמוֹנָה יְמֵי מִילָה, שִׁבְעָה יְמֵי שַׁבָּתָא, שִׁשָּׁה סִדְרֵי מִשְׁנָה, חֲמִשָׁה חוּמְשֵׁי תוֹרָה, אַרְבַּע אִמָהוֹת, שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ.

שְׁלשָׁה עָשָׂר מִי יוֹדֵעַ? שְׁלשָׁה עָשָׂר אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ: שְׁלשָׁה עָשָׂר מִדַּיָא, שְׁנֵים עָשָׂר שִׁבְטַיָא, אַחַד עָשָׂר כּוֹכְבַיָּא, עֲשָׂרָה דִבְּרַיָא, תִּשְׁעָה יַרְחֵי לֵדָה, שְׁמוֹנָה יְמֵי מִילָה, שִׁבְעָה יְמֵי שַׁבָּתָא, שִׁשָּׁה סִדְרֵי מִשְׁנָה, חֲמִשָׁה חוּמְשֵׁי תוֹרָה, אַרְבַּע אִמָהוֹת, שְׁלשָׁה אָבוֹת, שְׁנֵי לֻחוֹת הַבְּרִית, אֶחָד אֱלֹהֵינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַים וּבָאָרֶץ.

Echad mi yode’a? Echad ani yode’a: echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Shnayim mi yode’a? Shnayim ani yode’a: shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Shloshah mi yode’a? Shloshah ani yode’a: shloshah avot, shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Arba mi yode’a? Arba ani yode’a: arba imahot, shloshah avot, shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Chamishah mi yode’a? Chamishah ani yode’a: chamishah chumshei Torah, arba imahot, shloshah avot, shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Shishah mi yode’a? Shishah ani yode’a: shishah sidrei mishnah, chamishah chumshei Torah, arba imahot, shloshah avot, shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Shiv’ah mi yode’a? Shiv’ah ani yode’a: shiv’ah yimei shabbata, shishah sidrei mishnah, chamishah chumshei Torah, arba imahot, shloshah avot, shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Shmonah mi yode’a? Shmonah ani yode’a: shmonah yimei milah, shiv’ah yimei shabbata, shishah sidrei mishnah, chamishah chumshei Torah, arba imahot, shloshah avot, shnailuchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Tishah mi yode’a? Tishah ani yode’a: tishah yarchai laidah, shmonah yimei milah, shiv’ah yimei shabbata, shishah sidrei mishnah, chamishah chumshei Torah, arba imahot, shloshah avot, shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Asarah mi yode’a? Asarah ani yode’a: asarah dibraiya, tishah yarchai laidah, shmonah yimei milah, shiv’ah yimei shabbata, shishah sidrei mishnah, chamishah chumshei Torah, arba imahot, shloshah avot, shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Echad asar mi yode’a? Echad asar ani yode’a: echad asar kochvaya, asarah dibraiya, tishah yarchai laidah, shmonah yimei milah, shiv’ah yimei shabbata, shishah sidrei mishnah, chamishah chumshei Torah, arba imahot, shloshah avot, shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Shnaim asar mi yode’a? Shnaim asar ani yode’a: shnaim asar shivtaiya, echad asar kochvaya, asarah dibraiya, tishah yarchai laidah, shmonah yimei milah, shiv’ah yimei shabbata, shishah sidrei mishnah, chamishah chumshei Torah, arba imahot, shloshah avot, shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Shloshah asar mi yode’a? Shloshah asar ani yode’a: shloshah asar midaiya, shnaim asar shivtaiya, echad asar kochvaya, asarah dibraiya, tishah yarchai laidah, shmonah yimei milah, shiv’ah yimei shabbata, shishah sidrei mishnah, chamishah chumshei Torah, arba imahot, shloshah avot, shnai luchot habrit, echad Eloheinu shebashamayim u’va’aretz.

Songs
Source : Traditional song

One morning when Pharaoh woke in his bed

There were frogs in his bed and frogs on his head

Frogs on his nose and frogs on his toes

Frogs here. Frogs there. Frogs were jumping everywhere!