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Introduction
Source : BangItOut.com

The Matzah Show
Humorous
Bangitout.com

(to the theme of "The Muppet Show")

It's time to burn some chometz
It's time to bless the lights
It's time to start the seder, on the Matzah Show tonight

It's time to put on kittels
It's time to lean left, not right
It's time to raise the 4 cups, on the Matzah Show tonight

It's time to ask some questions
It's time to leave Egypt tonight
It's time to get things started on the most sensational
Inspirational, celebrational, sederational
This is what we call the Matzah Show!!!!!

(Discussion #1: How could Kermit be a plague?)

Kadesh
Source : Multiple sources

Lighting of the Holiday Candles

May these candles, lighted on the Festival of Freedom, bring light into our hearts and minds. May they renew our courage to act for justice and freedom here and now. May they illumine the path to truth, justice and peace. And so we repeat the ancient blessing:

ברוך אתה יי אלהינו מלך העולם אשר קדשנו במצותיו וצונו להדליק נר של יום טוב

Baruch atah Adonai Elohaynoo melech ha-olam, asher keedshanoo b’meetzvotav v’tzeevanoo l’hadleek ner shel (Shabbat v’shel) yom tov.

Praised are You, Lord our God, Whose presence fills the universe, Who has sanctified our lives through Your commandments and commanded us to kindle the Shabbat and festival lights.

 

ברוך אתה יי אלהינו מלך העולם שהחינו וקימנו והגיענו לזמן הזה

Baruch ata Adonai, Elohaynoo melech ha-olam, sheh’hech’eeyanoo v’keeyemanoo, v’heegeeanoo la-z’man ha-zeh.

Praised are You, Lord our God, Whose presence fills the universe, Who has sanctified our lives through Your commandments and commanded us to kindle the festival lights.

 

Kadesh
Source : Original

Like almost every Jewish holiday and ritual, we begin the Passover Seder by saying a blessing over grape juice, otherwise known as "Kadesh."  While we only recite a blessing over one cup of grape juice at this point in the seder, we actually recite blessings over four cups of grape juice throughout the entire seder.   These four cups represent the four promises made by God to Moses during the Book of Exodus, for God promised Moses and the Israelites that he would (1) Take them out of Egypt, (2) Free them from slavery, (3) Redeem them as a people, and (4) Take them into the land of Israel.   Each time we recite a blessing over grape juice, we are recalling the promises that God made to the Israelites, while our thanking God for giving these special days on the Jewish calendar for us to celebrate.

Kadesh
Source : Original

Now, we're going to take the wine/juice that we've poured and each add to Elijah's cup.

Now let's do the same from our water glasses to fill Miriam's cup.

Combining our actions together is what will help Elijah come to ourworld.

 We set an extra place for Elijah and we'll open the door and invite him in later. Miriam was Moses's sister and we honor her for how she helped Moses wich made our story possible today.

Urchatz
Source : Original

Seder Table

by Matt Waldman and Ana Fuchs

"I'll read the poems out loud, and you guess what on the Seder table I am rhyming about!"

Matzah, Carpas, an Egg and Maror

Haroset and shank bone for marking the door

Six items there are, and as you can see

They symbolize Pesach and tell our story

...Seder Plate!

We light them on Shabbat

And sometimes when it’s not

They gleam and glow

And you must know

To be careful because they are hot!

...Candles!

From grapes do we get this drink

For Seder, it’s 4 cups, I think

Kiddush is the blessing we’ll say

Over this for our Seder today.

...Kiddush cup!

It is crunchy and flat

Because it did not rise.

This unleavened bread

Should be no surprise.

...Matzah!

Each year on Passover

We read from these books

They teach us our story

But not how to cook.

....Haggadah!

Always one extra – a seat and a cup

We leave for this person, in case he shows up!

...Cup for Elijah!

Karpas
Source : original

The Seder Plate

Think of the Seder Plate as a “combination plate” dinner that formed the meal in ancient days. The foods were not merely symbolic, but were eaten—from the plate. As the Seder menu changed, the foods on the Seder Plate required explanation. (clockwise from the upper-right-of-center)

Zeroa (shankbone), represents the Passover offering made in Temple times.

Beitzah(boiled or roasted egg), represents the holiday offering made in the days of the Temple.

Maror (bitter herbs), is horseradish and represents the bitterness of slavery in Egypt.11 It will be explained during the Seder.

Charoset ( a mixture of chopped nuts, apples and wine (and other wonderful ingredients) represents the clay the Jews used to make bricks for the Egyptians.

Chazeret another bitter herb, a bitter lettuce.

Karpas any green vegetable (parsley, celery—some traditions suggest a boiled potato), represents the new

Karpas
Source : ajws.org

This Passover reading, for children ages 7-11, is part of a series of three Passover readings for children and adults created by American Jewish World Service (AJWS) to connect the holiday of Passover to the theme “from disaster to development.” As the recent earthquake in Haiti reminds us, we cannot only respond to disasters immediately after they happen, but we must support communities in their long-term efforts to recover and rebuild. Indeed, the Passover story itself contains this message—liberation from the trauma of oppression was not achieved in the single moment of the Exodus but rather unfolded gradually over 40 years in the desert and continues to unfold for us personally throughout our lives. Truly supporting and standing in solidarity with people who have suffered disaster and oppression means working with them over the long term to build strong, independent communities.

The Afikomen Hunt can be read aloud and prompt a discussion either towards the beginning of the seder when the matzah is broken (yachatz) or after the meal when children search for the afikomen (tzafun). The reading should help children understand the concepts of shortterm disaster relief (now) and long-term development (later), with the recent earthquake in Haiti as the prime example. We encourage you to use the reading to examine the ways we can help in the immediate aftermath of a disaster (providing food relief, water, medical supplies), as well as to explore how we can address long-term needs (rebuilding infrastructure, improving literacy, agricultural training). We also hope that it will spark discussion about how children can be empowered to respond to disasters in ways that help others.

Do you like looking for the afikomen? 

Do you get a prize or present if you find it? The afikomen is a piece of matzah that is broken at the beginning of the seder, but we look for it much later on, after we’ve eaten the seder meal. A broken matzah can make us think of other things that are broken. 

Maybe you have some things in your house that are broken, like a broken cup or a torn picture. You might try to fix these things with glue.  In the world, there are things that are broken so badly that a little glue won’t fix them. You’ve probably heard about the terrible earthquake in Haiti this past January which destroyed houses, schools and villages and killed many people. The earthquake broke the pipes which brought water to people in their homes, so there was no water to drink. The hospitals were destroyed and all of the medicines were gone.

When we hold the broken pieces of the afikomen, we can think about all of the broken pieces of Haiti. We can also think about ways that we can help to fix what’s broken in Haiti and the rest of the world. There are some things we can do right away. Right now, people need food and water, doctors and medicines, so we can collect food for people who are hungry and money to pay for medicines and supplies. There are other things we can do which will  help the people in Haiti for many years to come, not just for now. These things include fixing the roads and the water pipes and rebuilding hospitals. We can also help people in Haiti by sending seeds and plants so that farmers can replant their fields and grow their own food.  

Kids just like you are helping people in Haiti and other parts of the world in lots of ways. Some kids collect stuffed animals to send to children who live in a place where something terrible has happened. Other kids earn money from doing chores or selling lemonade and send this money to organizations that help people rebuild their houses and schools.   

The afikomen is broken at the beginning of the seder. That’s the now part.  but we eat it much later.  We can find ways to help people who are in trouble, both now and later.

While eating your afikomen, talk about one thing that you can do to help out in Haiti, where so much is broken, just like the afikomen.

-- Four Questions
Source : Original by Heidi Aycock

On all other nights, we get biscuits and rolls,
Fluffy and puffy and full of air holes.
Why on this night, why, tell me why,
Only this flat stuff that’s always so dry.

On all other nights, we eat all kinds of greens,
And I’m starting to like them – except lima beans.
Why on this night, I ask on my knees,
Do we eat stuff so bitter it makes grownups wheeze?

On all other nights, we dip vegies just once –
Just try dipping twice and they’ll call you a dunce.
Why on this night, why, tell me true,
Why double-dipping’s the right thing to do.

On all other nights, we sit up when we munch.
You’ll choke if you slump! You’ll croak if you hunch!
Why on this night, if anyone knows,
Do we get to recline on my mom’s good pillows.

Why is this night so different from most?
Why do we do things so odd and so gross?
Why do we tell the same stories and stuff?
Because when it’s Pesach, it’s never enough!

-- Four Questions
Source : http://www.akhlah.com/jewish-holidays/passover/four-questions/

מה נשתנה הלילה הזה מכל הלילות

Why is this night different from all other nights?

שבכל הלילות אנו אוכלין חמץ ומצה הלילה הזה כלו מצה

Why is it that on all other nights during the year we eat bread or matzah, but on this night we eat matzah?

שבכל הלילות אנו אוכלין שאר ירקות הלילה הזה מרור

Why is it that on all other nights we eat all kinds of vegetables, but on this night we eat bitter herbs?

שבכל הלילות אין אנו מטבילין אפילו פעם אחת הלילה הזה שתי פעמים

Why is it on all other nights we do not dip even once, but on this night we dip twice?

שבכל הלילות אנו אוכלין בין יושבין ובין מסובין הלילה הזה כלנו מסבין

Why is it that on all other nights we eat either sitting or reclining, but on this night we eat in a  reclining position

   FourQuestions.jpg

 Dvar Torah

-- Four Questions
Source : traditional

מַה נִּשְׁתַּנָּה הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה מִכָּל הַלֵּילות

Ma nishtana halaila hazeh mikol haleilot?

Why is this night different from all other nights?

:שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכלין חָמֵץ וּמַצָּה  הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה כֻּלּוֹ מצה  

Shebichol haleilot anu ochlin chameitz u-matzah. Halaila hazeh kulo matzah.

On all other nights we eat both leavened bread and matzah. Tonight we only eat matzah.

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכְלִין שְׁאָר יְרָקוֹת הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה מָרוֹר:

Shebichol haleilot anu ochlin shi’ar yirakot haleila hazeh maror.

On all other nights we eat all kinds of vegetables, but tonight we eat bitter herbs.

ֶ שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אֵין אָֽנוּ מַטְבִּילִין אֲפִילוּ פַּֽעַם אחָת  הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה שְׁתֵּי פְעמים:

Shebichol haleilot ain anu matbilin afilu pa-am echat. Halaila hazeh shtei fi-amim.

On all other nights we aren’t expected to dip our vegetables one time. Tonight we do it twice.

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכְלִין בֵּין יוֹשְׁבִין וּבֵין מְסֻבִּין.  :הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה כֻּלָּֽנוּ מְסֻבין:

Shebichol haleilot anu ochlin bein yoshvin uvein m’subin. Halaila hazeh kulanu m’subin.

On all other nights we eat either sitting normally or reclining. Tonight we recline.

-- Exodus Story
-- Ten Plagues
Source : chabad.org, wikipedia.org

The ten plagues were sent by God to the Egyptians to help convince Pharaoh to let the Israelites go free.

1. Blood - Blood turned all the water in Egypt to blood- whether in lakes or jars.

2. Frogs - Frogs hopped around Egypt.

3. Lice - (Head) Lice was brought upon all of the Egyptians.

4. Wild animals - Wild animals ran free in Egypt- possibly attacking Egyptians.

5. Cattle plagues - Cattle plague killed and diseased all of the cattle and livestock.

6. Boils - Boils appeared on the Egyptian's skin and blistered.

7. Hail - Hail rained down.

8. Locusts - Locusts came and ate all of the crops needed for food.

9. Darkness - Darkness was only brought upon the Egyptians that was impossible to see through, and light remained on the side of the Israelites.

10. Death of the first born - The Israelites put the blood of a lamb on the door posts to protect themselves from the killing of the first born. If there was no blood, the first born would die including the son of Pharaoh. *This is where the Jewish concept of putting something on the door post comes from.

A custom is to dip your finger in wine or grape juice and make dots for each one of the 10 plagues.
 

Discussion Question:
Why do you think these plagues were chosen out of all the punishments possible?

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : Orginial

We are grateful that we are together on this night as a family ~ Dayenu

We are grateful that we are together to share this moment ~ Dayenu

We are grateful that we are together, alive and healthy ~ Dayenu

We are grateful that we are able to eat together ~ Dayenu

We are grateful that we have a light shining upon us ~ Dayenu

We are grateful for everything and everyone that we have ~ Dayenu

We are grateful for all that has touched our lives ~Dayenu

We are grateful that our ancestors never gave up home, and to them we drink the second glass of wine together ~ Dayenu

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu
Source : http://zemerl.com/cgi-bin/show.pl?title=Dayenu

Ilu ho-tsi, ho-tsi-a-nu, 
Ho-tsi-a-nu mi-Mitz-ra-yim, 
Ho-tsi-a-nu mi-Mitz-ra-yim, 
Da-ye-nu!

.. CHORUS: 
.. Dai, da-ye-nu, 
.. Dai, da-ye-nu, 
.. Dai, da-ye-nu, 
.. Da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu! 
.. 
.. Dai, da-ye-nu, 
.. Dai, da-ye-nu, 
.. Dai, da-ye-nu, 
.. Da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu!

Ilu na-tan, na-tan la-nu, 
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-Sha-bat, 
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-Sha-bat, 
Da-ye-nu!

.. (CHORUS)

Ilu na-tan, na-tan la-nu, 
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-To-rah, 
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-To-rah, 
Da-ye-nu!

.. (CHORUS) 

Hallel
Source : The Jewish Secular Community Passover Hagada

On the Seder night, we open the door for Elijah the Prophet, and we place a cup of wine on the table especially for him.

Our hopes have long been centered around Elijah since legends suggest that he will herald the time of complete human freedom. But he will come only when people have prepared the way for him. This simply means that we, the all, are Elijah. We must liberate ourselves from prejudice and injustice. We must truly listen to each other for better iunderstanding. We need to remember our goal of creating a world where all people will be free, just as we were liberated from slavery in ancient Egypt.

Song:

E-LEE-AH-HU HAH-NAH-VEE

E-lee-ah-hu hah-nah-vee     

E-lee-ah-hu hah-tish-bee    

E-lee-ah-hu A-lee-ah-hu    

E-lee-ah-hu ha-gil-a-dee    

Bim-hay-rah B'yah-may-nu

Yah-voh a-lay-nu

Eem mah-she-ach ben-David

Eem-mah-she-ach ben-David

E-lee-ah-hu hah-nah-vee

E-lee-ah-hu hah-tish-bee

E-lee-ah-hu A-lee-ah-hu

E-lee-ah-hu ha-gil-a-dee

Translation: Elijah the Prophet,

Elijah the Tishbite,

Elijah the Gileadite,

Come to us quickly and in our day.

Songs
Source : Franny Silverman, for the Sh'ma Haggadah supplement

Dayenu means "it would have been enough."  And not in a kvetchy/sarcastic way!  Dayenu is a sincere expression of gratitude, of the Jewish people's cup overfloweth. 

There are many any verses in the Hebrew proclaiming how it would have been enough just to be brought out from slavery in Egpyt, to get the Torah, to be gifted Shabbat, etc...

In this version, you may sing some, all or none of the traditional verses, but then open it up so Dayenu can become a participatory song where everyone offers their own "dayenu" for the year. As in: It would have been enough if________, but also ______! Dayenu! Day-day-enu...etc...

For example:It would have been enough if I graduated high school this year, but I also got accepted to my top choice for college! Dayenu! (And everyone sings the chorus!)

This an be done at the Dayenu moment in the Seder or introduced earlier and then whenever someone is moved throughout the Seder to share their Dayenu moment, they can. Depends on the enthusiasm of the crowd. 

Songs
Source : Haggadot.com

One Little Goat - חַד גַּדְיָא

A long time ago there was a little goat

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

Chad gadya, chad gadya,


Then came the cat, and ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

Chad gadya, chad gadya,


Then came the dog, and bit the cat, that ate the goat,

Which father bought for two zuzim.

Chad gadya, chad gadya,


Then came the stick, and beat the dog,

that bit the cat, that ate the goat,

Which father bought for two zuzim.

Chad gadya, chad gadya,

Then came the fire, and burned the stick,

that beat the dog, that bit the cat, that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

Chad gadya, chad gadya,

Then came the water, and extinguished the fire,

that burned the stick, that beat the dog,

that bit the cat, that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

Chad gadya, chad gadya,


Then came the ox, and drank the water,

that extinguished the fire, that burned the stick,

that beat the dog, that bit the cat, that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

Chad gadya, chad gadya,

One little goat, one little goat:

Then came the slaughterer, and killed the ox,

that drank the water, that extinguished the fire,

that burned the stick, that beat the dog,

that bit the cat, that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

Chad gadya, chad gadya,

Then came the angel of death, and slew the slaughterer,

who killed the ox, that drank the water,

that extinguished the fire, that burned the stick,

that beat the dog, that bit the cat, that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

Chad gadya, chad gadya,

Then came the Holy One, Blessed be He,

and smote the angel of death, who slew the slaughterer,

who killed the ox, that drank the water,

that extinguished the fire, that burned the stick,

that beat the dog, that bit the cat, that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

Chad gadya, chad gadya,