Passover 2016/5776

By Elizabeth Spring




Table of Contents

Introduction

Welcome

Kadesh

Lighting of the Candles

I will take you out...

Karpas

Fruit of the Earth

Yachatz

Bread of Affliction

-- Four Questions

Mah Nishtanah

Why is This Night Different?

-- Four Children

Ballad of the Four Sons

-- Exodus Story

The Story

We Were Slaves

-- Ten Plagues

Ten Plagues

Diminishing our Cup

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

It Would Have Been Enough

Dayenu

Dayenu Song

I will deliver you...

Seder Plate

Avadim Hayinu

Rachtzah

Rachtzah

Motzi-Matzah

Motzi-Matzah

Maror

The Bitter Herbs

Koreich

Visual Koreich

Shulchan Oreich

Shulchan Orech

Tzafun

Afikomen

Bareich

I will redeem you...

Eliyahu and Miriam

Miriam's Song

Hallel

Praises and Songs

Top Seder Songs "Just the Hits!"

Who Knows One?

I will take you as a nation...

Nirtzah

L'shana Haba'ah!

Next Year in Jerusalem





Thank you for joining us for the Pesach seder! We hope that tonight brings the following:

  • Reflection; a celebration of our exodus from Egypt and Yeshua's sacrifice as our Passover Lamb.
  • Expectation; looking to the future for the bringing in of the Messianic reign and the return of Yeshua ben David.
  • Commitment; renewing our covenant to YHVH at this very time, as our ancestors did on the very first Pesach night.

​.

Please wash your hands before sitting down for the seder, and remember to recline throughout the evening.





Let us welcome in the Shabbat and with her, the feast of Pesach.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָּנוּ לְהַדלִיק נֵר שֶׁל יוֹם טוֹב.

Baruch atah Adonai Elohenu Melech ha-olam, asher kidshanu b'mitzvohtav vetzi vonu l'chad leek ner, shel Shabbat v'shel Yom Tov

Blessed are you, O Lord our God, King of the Universe, who has sanctified us by His commandments and has commanded us to be a light to the nations and has given us Yeshua the Messiah, the light of the world and this Festival day.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, שֶׁהֶחֱיָנוּ וְקִיְּמָנוּ וְהִגִּיעָנוּ לַזְּמַן הַזֶּה

Baruch atah Adonai, Eloheinu melech ha olam, shehechiyanu v' kee yi manu, v' he gee yahu, laz man hazeh

Blessed are you, Lord our God, King of the universe, who has kept us alive, sustained us, and enabled us to reach this season.

Fill the first cup of wine!





God uses four expressions of redemption in describing our exodus from Egypt and our birth as a nation I will take you out... I will save you... I will redeem you... I will take you as a nation…

.

We drink a glass of wine to celebrate each expression of God's redemption. Focus on each one as you drain each cup.

Lift the first glass of wine

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָפֶן

Baruch atah Adonai Elohenu Melech ha-olam, borey p'ree ha-gaphen.

Blessed are you, Lord our God, king of the universe, who creates the fruit of the vine

Drink the first cup





In partaking of this fruit of the earth, we give thanks to God for all His bounties. We also recall that our forefathers were tillers of the soil, who were ever grateful for the earth's produce. In tasting of the salt water, we are asked to remember the tears which our ancestors shed while suffering the tortures of slavery. May our gratitude for the blessings which we enjoy help to soften the pain of sorrow, and convert tears to joy and appreciation.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הָאֲדָמָה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree ha-adama.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruits of the earth



Yachatz

Bread of Affliction

Contributed by Elizabeth Spring
Source: ha-mashiach.com


Three sheets of matzot, what do they represent? Some of the sages have suggested that the three matzot represent the life and testimony of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. But why is the middle matzah (Isaac) broken in half? This suggests the Akedah (the binding of Isaac) by his father Abraham. This is an illustration of the sacrifice of Messiah, since the first occurrence of the word love in the Scriptures (ahavah - Genesis 22:2) refers to a father’s love for his "only" son who was offered as a sacrifice on mount Moriah.

This part of the Seder is a clear prophetic witness to the provision of Messiah Ben Elohim. He is the Korban Pesach of the heavenly Father.

Yachatz! Divide! As the Sea of Reeds parted before the Israelites, so this matzah will be divided. Let us remember our salvation, as the bread of haste and affliction now resembles our path to freedom.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם הַמּוֹצִיא לֶחֶם מִן הָאָרֶץ

Baruch atah Adonai, Eloheinu melech ha olam, ha motzi lechem min ha-aretz

Blessed are you, Lord our God, King of the universe, who brings forth bread from the earth. Amen.

Yeshua is the “Seh haElohim” who takes away the sin of the world. The broken middle piece of matzah is a picture of the suffering Messiah (Is. 53). This piece, called the afikomen, is taken, wrapped up, and carefully hidden from view, only to be discovered at the end of the Seder. This is an image of the death, burial, and resurrection of Messiah Ben Joseph from the dead.

The afikomen is wrapped in a linen cloth and hidden away while the children cover their eyes. They will be searching for it later! The smaller piece of the now broken matzah is divided among the participants and eaten.





Youngest child able to read sings:

.

Mah nishtanah halaylah hazeh [mikol halaylot x2]

She-bechol halaylot ain anu matbilin [afilu pa’am echat x2],

halaylah hazeh, halaylah hazeh shtei pe’amim?

halaylah hazeh, halaylah hazeh shtei pe’amim?

She-bechol halaylot anu ochlim [chametz o matzah x2],

halaylah hazeh, halaylah hazeh kulo matzah?

halaylah hazeh, halaylah hazeh kulo matzah?

She-bechol halaylot anu ochlim [she’ar yerakot x2],

halaylah hazeh, halaylah hazeh maror?

halaylah hazeh, halaylah hazeh maror?

She-bechol halaylot anu ochlim [bain yoshvin u-vain mesubin x2],

halaylah hazeh, halaylah hazeh kulanu mesubin?

halaylah hazeh, halaylah hazeh kulanu mesubin?





Child and his grandfather have a Q&A on why this night is different from all other nights:

Child: On all other nights we eat leavened products and matzah, and on this night only matzah?

Saba: Matzah reminds us that when our ancestors left Egypt they had no time to let their bread rise, so they baked their bread with no leaven.

Child: On all other nights we eat all vegetables, and on this night only bitter herbs?

Saba: The maror (bitter herbs) reminds us of the bitter and cruel way that Pharoah treated our ancestors as slaves in Egypt.

Child: On all other nights, we don’t dip our food even once, and on this night we dip twice?

Saba: We dip our herbs in charoset to remind us of the bitterness of our slavery, the cheroset reminds us of the clay our ancestors used to make bricks for Pharoah's buildings. We dip parsley in salt water to remind us of the tears of our captivity.

Child: On all other nights we eat sitting or reclining, and on this night we only recline?

Saba: We eat comfortably to remind us that we are no longer slaves but a free and redeemed people.



-- Four Children

Ballad of the Four Sons

Contributed by Steven Scher
Source: Copyright Ben Aronin, first published in his community haggadah, 1954

Said the father to the children
"At the Seder you will dine,
You will eat your fill of matzoh,
You will drink four cups of wine."

Now this father had no daughters,
But his sons they numbered four,
One was wise, and one was wicked,
One was simple and a bore.

And the fourth was sweet and winsome,
He was young and he was small,
While his brothers asked the questions,
He could scarcely speak at all.

Said the wise one to his father
"Would you please explain the laws.
Of the customs of the Seder
Will you please explain the cause?"

And the father proudly answered
"As our fathers ate in speed,
Ate the Pascal lamb 'ere midnight,
And from slavery were freed"

"So we follow their example,
And 'ere midnight must complete,
All the Seder, and we should not
After twelve remain to eat."

Then did sneer the son so wicked,
"What does all this mean to you?"
And the father's voice was bitter
As his grief and anger grew.

"If yourself you don't consider,
As a son of Israel
Then for you this has no meaning,
You could be a slave as well!"

Then the simple son said softly,
"What is this?" and quietly
The good father told his offspring
"We were freed from slavery."

But the youngest son was silent,
For he could not speak at all,
His bright eyes were bright with wonder
As his father told him all.

Now, dear people, heed the lesson
And remember evermore,
What the father told his children
Told his sons who numbered four!



-- Exodus Story

The Story

Contributed by Elizabeth Spring
Source: barrylou.com


The Haggadah sets forth the theme that we — not just our ancestors — were slaves to Pharaoh but God delivered each of us “with a mighty hand and an outstretched arm.” We tell the story of the Exodus and search its meaning to better understand and appreciate its message.

We have an obligation to retell the story of our Exodus from Egypt in order to remind ourselves that the struggle for freedom is a constant one. Over the years, Rabbis reasoned that since the Torah commands us to retell the story, this must be done creatively, in a way that is compelling to the next generation.

Everyone fill and raise the second cup of wine, but do not drink - All say:

In every generation enemies rise up against us, seeking to destroy us, and in every generation God delivers us from their hands into freedom.

All replace their cups untasted




The Torah says we are to speak these words before God and say, “My father was a wandering Aramean. He went down into Egypt and sojourned there. With few in number, he became there a great and populous nation. The Egyptians dealt harshly with us and afflicted us and imposed hard labor upon us. And we cried out to the Lord, the God of our fathers, and God heard our cry and saw our affliction and our oppression. He brought us out of Egypt with a mighty hand and with an outstretched arm and with great signs and wonders.”

We will now recount the Passover story. As we read, we will go around the table with each person taking a turn to read a paragraph out loud:

Our patriarch Abraham and his wife Sarah went to the land of Canaan, where he became the founder of “a great nation.” God tells Abraham, “Know this for certain, that your descendants will be strangers in a strange land, and be enslaved and oppressed for four hundred years. But know that in the end I shall bring judgment on the oppressors.”

Abraham’s grandson, Jacob and his family went down to Egypt during a time of famine throughout the land. In Egypt, Jacob and the Israelites lived and prospered until a new Pharaoh arose who said, “Behold the children of Israel are too many and too mighty for us. Let us then deal shrewdly with them, lest they become more powerful, and in the event of war, join our enemies in fighting against us and gain control over the region.”

The Egyptians set taskmasters over the Israelites with forced labor and made them build cities for Pharaoh. The Egyptians embittered the lives of the Israelites with harsh labor but the more they were oppressed, the more they increased and the Egyptians came to despise them. Pharaoh ordered, “Every Hebrew boy that is born shall be thrown in the Nile River and drowned.”

God remembered the covenant that he made with Abraham and Sarah and called to Moses, telling him to appear before Pharaoh and demand that the Hebrew people be released from bondage. But Pharaoh refused to free the Israelites. Nine times Moses and his brother Aaron went to Pharaoh, and each time that Pharaoh refused Moses’ request, God sent a plague to Egypt.

After the ninth plague, Moses summoned the elders of Israel and told them to have their families mark their door posts and lintels with the blood of a lamb saying, “none of you shall go out of his house until the morning, for the Lord will pass through to strike the Egyptians, and when he sees the blood on the lintel and on the two doorposts, the Lord will pass over the door and will not allow the destroyer to enter your houses to strike you.”

It is written in the Torah that God hardened the heart of Pharaoh during Moses’ pleas. Finally when God brought down the tenth plague upon them — the death of the first-born of all the Egyptians — a great cry went up throughout Egypt, and Pharaoh allowed Moses to take his people out of the land and deliver them to a new land.

It is written: “And it shall come to pass, when you come to the land which God will give you, according as He has promised, that you shall keep this service to commemorate the Exodus. And it shall come to pass, when your children shall say to you, “What mean you by this service?” you shall say, it is the sacrifice of God's Passover, who passed over the houses of the children of Israel in Egypt.”



-- Ten Plagues

Ten Plagues

Contributed by Elizabeth Spring
Source: barrylou.com


As Moses and the Israelites were fleeing Egypt, Pharaoh’s armies pursued them as they were encamped by the sea. Moses held out his hand over the sea and the Lord drove back the sea, allowing the Israelites to pass, but drowned the Egyptians.

There is a Midrash that tells of God rebuking His angels for rejoicing as the Egyptians were drowning, saying, “Are these not my children also?”

With our pinky finger, we now pour three drops of wine for each plague inflicted upon Egypt. A full cup of wine is the symbol of complete joy. Though we celebrate our freedom, our cup cannot be filled because our freedom did not come without a cost. Each drop of wine that we pour out of our cups diminishes our joy.



-- Ten Plagues

Diminishing our Cup

Contributed by Elizabeth Spring
Source: abidinginthevine.com


The Frog Song

One morning when Pharoah woke in his bed
There were frogs on his head and frogs in his bed frogs on his nose and frogs on his toes
Frogs – here!
Frogs – there!
Frogs were jumping everywhere!




One of most beloved songs in the Passover seder is "Dayenu". We will go around the table, reading the stanzas one at a time, and then everyone else will respond, "Dayenu" – meaning, “it would have been enough”.

How many times do we forget to pause and notice that where we are is exactly where we ought to be? Dayenu is a reminder to never forget all the miracles in our lives. When we stand and wait impatiently for the next one to appear, we are missing the whole point of life. Instead, we can actively seek a new reason to be grateful, a reason to say “Dayenu.”

Fun fact: Persian and Afghani Jews hit each other over the heads and shoulders with scallions every time they say Dayenu! They especially use the scallions in the ninth stanza which mentions the manna that the Israelites ate everyday in the desert, because Torah tells us that the Israelites began to complain about the manna and longed for the onions, leeks and garlic.




If He had brought us out from Egypt,

and had not carried out judgments against them

Dayenu!

If He had carried out judgments against them,

and not against their idols

Dayenu!

If He had destroyed their idols,

and had not smitten their first-born

Dayenu!

If He had smitten their first-born,

and had not given us their wealth

Dayenu!

If He had given us their wealth,

and had not split the sea for us

Dayenu! 

If He had split the sea for us,

and had not taken us through it on dry land

Dayenu!

If He had taken us through the sea on dry land,

and had not drowned our oppressors in it

Dayenu!

If He had drowned our oppressors in it,

and had not supplied our needs in the desert for forty years

Dayenu!

If He had supplied our needs in the desert for forty years,

and had not fed us the manna

Dayenu!

If He had fed us the manna,

and had not given us the Shabbat

Dayenu!

If He had given us the Shabbat,

and had not brought us before Mount Sinai

Dayenu!

If He had brought us before Mount Sinai,

and had not given us the Torah

Dayenu!

If He had given us the Torah,

and had not brought us into the land of Israel

Dayenu!

If He had brought us into the land of Israel,

and not built for us the Holy Temple

Dayenu!

If He had built for us the Holy Temple,

and had not given us Yeshua Ha Moshiach

Dayenu!




Ilu ho-tsi, ho-tsi-a-nu,
Ho-tsi-a-nu mi-Mitz-ra-yim,
Ho-tsi-a-nu mi-Mitz-ra-yim,
Da-ye-nu!

.. CHORUS:
.. Dai, da-ye-nu,
.. Dai, da-ye-nu,
.. Dai, da-ye-nu,
.. Da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu, da-ye-nu!

.. X2

Ilu na-tan, na-tan la-nu,
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-Sha-bat,
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-Sha-bat,
Da-ye-nu!

.. (CHORUS)

Ilu na-tan, na-tan la-nu,
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-To-rah,
Na-tan la-nu et-ha-To-rah,
Da-ye-nu!

.. (CHORUS)




Just as we remember all of the times throughout history when the nations of the world shut their doors on Jews fleeing violence and persecution in their homelands, so, too, do we remember with gratitude the bravery of those who took us in during our times of need the Ottoman Sultan who welcomed Spanish Jews escaping the Inquisition, Algerian Muslims who protected Jews during pogroms in the French Pied -Noir, and the righteous gentiles hiding Jews in their homes during World War II. In the midst of the current global refugee crisis, we aspire to stand on the right side of history as we ask our own government to take a leadership role in protecting the world’s most vulnerable refugees. May we find the bravery to open up our nation and our hearts to those who are in need. Blessed are You, Adonai our God, who delivers those in search of safety.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

Blessed are You, King of the universe, who creates the fruit of the vine.

You can now drink the second cup.




The shank bone represents the Pesach, the special lamb sacrifice made on the night of the first Passover, in the days of the Temple for the Passover holiday, and of Yeshua - our Passover Lamb and renewer of our covenant with Elohim (Gen 22:7-8, Is. 53:7, Acts 8:31-35, John 1:29).

The matzah reminds us that when the Israelites were finally free to leave Egypt, there was no time to pack or prepare. They grabbed whatever dough was made and set out on their journey, letting their dough bake into matzah as they departed. We are also reminded of the words of Yeshua, “This is my body, which was broken for you.” and “By his stripes we are healed” (Ex. 12:39, Luke 22:19, Is. 53:5)

The bitter herbs provide a visceral reminder of the bitterness of slavery, the life of hard labor experienced in Egypt. “And they made their lives bitter with hard service, in mortar and bricks, and in all kinds of work in the field; in all their work they made them serve with rigor.” (Ex. 1:14) Furthermore we are reminded that we are born into bondage “slaves of sin”, but due to the blood of Yeshua placed on the doorpost of our hearts are redeemed and now bondservants of righteousness. (Romans 6:17-23)





Avadim hayinu, hayinu

Ata b’nei horin, b’nei horin

[Avadim hayinu--ata, ata b’nei horin x2] b'nei horin!

We were slaves in Egypt, we were slaves

But now we all are free, we all are free

[While in Egypt, we were slaves

But now, but now, we all are free x2] we all are free!



Rachtzah

Rachtzah

Contributed by Haggadot
Source: Design by Haggadot.com





Take the uppermost matzah and break it into pieces and distribute it to each participant at our Seder.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם הַמּוֹצִיא לֶחֶם מִן הָאָרֶץ

Baruch atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha’olam ha’motzi lechem min ha’aretz.

Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the universe, Who brings forth bread from the Earth.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָּנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מַצָּה

Baruch atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha’olam asher kidshanu bemitzvotav ve-tzivanu al achilat matzah.

Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the universe, who sanctifies us with commandments, and commands us to eat matzah.

Eat the matzah





Now take a kezayit (the volume of one olive) of the maror. Dip it into the charoset, but not so much that the bitter taste is neutralized. Recite the following blessing and then eat the maror (without reclining):

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָּנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מָרוֹר.

Baruch atah Adonai Eloheinu melech ha-olam, asher kid'shanu b'mitzvotav v'tzivanu al achilat maror.

Blessed are you, Lord our God, King of the universe, who has sanctified us through commandments, and has commanded us to eat the bitter herb.



Koreich

Visual Koreich

Contributed by Matan Inc
Source: Matan





Tzafun

Afikomen

Contributed by Elizabeth Spring
Source: Ha-maschiach.com


Tzafun means “hidden” and refers to the larger half of the matzah that was broken and hidden away (“buried”). The Afikomen ritual has been a part of the Passover ceremony since Second Temple times, during the time of Yeshua - Messiah Ben Joseph. The Greek word aphikomenos means “He is coming” and therefore Messiah will appear again soon, as the conquering Messiah Ben David.

The children will now search for the Afikomen, the leader then unwraps it and breaks it into small portions so that everyone present may partake of it.

Yeshua broke the Afikomen and gave each one present a piece. “And when He had given thanks, He broke it and said, ‘This is my body, which is for you. Do this in remembrance of Me.’” He used the symbol of the Afikomen to represent His body that was broken for the sins of the world. The hidden portion that was hidden but now is found represents discovery of the Messiah who is the Lechem ha-Chayim (the Bread of Life). As we eat this matzah we acnowledge that the Suffering Messiah is the Korban Pesach. This we continue to do until He returns to effect the complete restoration of Israel as the conquering Messiah ben David.

Barukh atah Adonai Eloheinu Melekh ha-olam, ha-motzi lechem emet min ha-shamayim.

Blessed are You, Lord our God King of the universe, who brings forth the true bread from heaven.



Bareich

I will redeem you...

Contributed by Elizabeth Spring
Source: Albert Dov Sigal (image


Fill the 3rd cup.

We will go around the table, each saying aloud a stanza of the blessing for after the meal

When the Lord brought back the captives of Zion, we were like those who dream!

Our mouth was filled with laughter, and our tongue with song.

Then they said among the nations, the Lord has done great things for them;

The Lord has done great things for us, and we rejoiced!

Restore us, O God, as you restore the streams in the desert.

May those who sow in tears, reap with joy!

May he who goes forth weeping, bearing seed for sowing, come home with joyous song, bearing ripe sheaves!

Blessed be the name of the Lord from henceforth and forever more.

Blessed be our God, of whose bounty we have been satisfied, and in whose goodness we live.

All:

Blessed are you, Oh Lord our God, who gives nourishment to all the world in goodness and in loving kindness. Because of His great goodness we have never lacked food, and may we never lack it in all time to come. Blessed are you, Oh Lord, who gives food to all! Blessed be He; blessed be His name.

We now make ourselves ready to partake of the third cup, the cup of Redemption. Before drinking, we recite:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech ha-olam boray pree hagafen.

Blessed are You, O Lord our God, King of the universe, who created the fruit of the vine.

In the Brit Chadashah we learn that Yeshua took the bread and wine after the meal and with the raising of the cup of Redemption He said, “This cup is the renewed covenant in my blood, which is shed for you.” The cup of Redemption commemorates the shed blood of the Messiah our Korban Pesach. This cup symbolizes our participation in the ketubah (marriage contract) of the renewed covenant. The groom signified His pledge by sharing a cup of wine with His bride. The observance of Pesach, therefore, is a means of our bearing witness to our ‘union’ with the Messiah and to the heavenly Father who sent Him to us to be our Kinsman Redeemer, High Priest, and King forever.

The Messiah will return from heaven to earth a second time but not this time as the Suffering Messiah. He will return in glory to Israel as the glorified Messiah Ben David. This is why in His first appearance Yeshua said He would not drink the fourth cup, the cup of Restoration. Messiah knew the world was not ready for Him to establish the kingdom of heaven on earth at the time of His last observance of the Passover supper. He knew at that time that He would return a second time. Therefore He promised His disciples that He would drink the Cup of Restoration with them in the future when He would return in triumph and establish the Kingdom of heaven on earth.

Drink the cup of Redemption





By placing a cup of wine on the seder table and opening the door after our meal, we recognize that when the Messiah returns- just as Yochanan was an Elijah-type announcing his first coming - there will come before him the prophet Elijah to announce the coming of redemption of all Israel. “Behold, I will send you Elijah the prophet before the great and awesome day of the Lord comes. And he will turn the hearts of fathers to their children and the hearts of children to their fathers, lest I come and strike the land with a decree of utter destruction.” Malachi 3:23-24

Fill the cup of Elijah until it overflows, then the youngest child present will open the door to let Elijah in - calling out to see if he has arrived. Then we all sing together:

Eliyahu Hanavi, Eliyahu hatishbi, Eliyahu, Eliyahu, Eliyahu hagiladi.

Bimheirah b'yamenu, yavo aylenu, Im Mashiach ben-David, Im Mashiach ben-David

Eliyahu Hanavi, Eliyahu hatishbi, Eliyahu, Eliyahu, Eliyahu hagiladi.

Bimheirah b'yamenu, yavo aylenu, Im Mashiach ben-David, Im Mashiach ben-David

Elijah the prophet, the returning man of Gilad: return to us speedily, in our days with the messiah, son of David.

After commemorating the very first redemption of the Hebrew people from Egypt, we express our hope and firm belief in the coming of Moshiach ben David, who will usher in the new and final redemption very very soon.

Where Elijah represents the movement of history and path to redemption, Miriam represents ongoing healing, renewal and sustenance on the journey. Miriam is beginning, Elijah is end. Miriam is present, Elijah is future. Miriam is place, Elijah is time. Miriam is the sea, Elijah is the mountain.

Legend says that fresh water miraculously followed Miriam as the Hebrews traveled through the desert, providing them with sustenance. God gave this gift to Miriam, the prophetess, to honor her bravery and devotion to the Hebrew people.

We fill Miriam's cup with water to honor her role in ensuring the survival of our people. Like Miriam, Hebrew women in all generations have been essential for the continuity of our people. As keepers of traditions in the home, women sustained their families and kept rituals and recipes alive in songs and stories from mother to daughter, from generation to generation.We place Miriam's cup on our Seder table to honor the important role of women in our tradition and history, whose stories have been too sparingly told. For Miriam we lift our water glasses and say:

Zot be'er Miriam kos mayim chayam.

This is the well of Miriam, the cup of living waters.



Bareich

Miriam's Song

Contributed by Elizabeth Spring
Source: Debbie Friedman, JulieWohlCreations (image)


And the women dancing with their timbrels
Followed Miriam as she sang her song
Sing a song to the One whom we've exalted.
Miriam and the women danced and danced
the whole night long.

And Miriam was a weaver of unique variety.
The tapestry she wove was one which sang our history.
With every thread and every strand
she crafted her delight.
A woman touched with spirit, she dances
toward the light.

And the women dancing with their timbrels
Followed Miriam as she sang her song
Sing a song to the One whom we've exalted.
Miriam and the women danced and danced
the whole night long.

As Miriam stood upon the shores and gazed across the sea,
The wonder of this miracle she soon came to believe.
Whoever thought the sea would part with an outstretched hand,
And we would pass to freedom, and march to the promised land.

And the women dancing with their timbrels
Followed Miriam as she sang her song
Sing a song to the One whom we've exalted.
Miriam and the women danced and danced
the whole night long.

And Miriam the Prophet took her timbrel in her hand,
And all the women followed her just as she had planned.
And Miriam raised her voice with song.
She sang with praise and might,
We've just lived through a miracle, we're going to dance tonight!

And the women dancing with their timbrels
Followed Miriam as she sang her song
Sing a song to the One whom we've exalted.
Miriam and the women danced and danced
the whole night long.




At this point, it is customary to sing selections from the Tehillim/Psalms, continuing our thanks to God for redeeming our ancestors from Egypt and his continuous protection. It is a time of singing and of praise. We are to love Adonai with all our hearts, with all our souls and with all our might and to diligently teach our children the Torah commandments, speaking of them daily and keeping them close to our minds and close to our hearts.

Psalm 136 will be said responsively; we will take turns reciting the first part of the verse while the rest recite the conclusion of the verse in bold.

Give thanks to Adonai, for he is good for His mercy endures forever!

Give thanks to the God of gods for His mercy endures forever!

Give thanks to the Lord of lords for His mercy endures forever!

To him who alone has done great wonders for His mercy endures forever!

To him who skillfully made the heavens for His mercy endures forever!

To him who spread out the earth on the water for His mercy endures forever!

To him who made the great lights for His mercy endures forever!

The sun to rule the day for His mercy endures forever!

The moon and stars to rule the night for His mercy endures forever!

To him who struck down Egypt's firstborn for His mercy endures forever!

And brought Israel out from among them for His mercy endures forever!

With a mighty hand and an outstretched arm for His mercy endures forever!

To him who split apart the Sea of Suf for His mercy endures forever!

And made Israel cross right through it for His mercy endures forever!

But swept Pharaoh and his army into the Sea of Suf for His mercy endures forever!

To him who led his people through the desert for His mercy endures forever!

To him who struck down great kings for His mercy endures forever!

Yes, he slaughtered powerful kings for His mercy endures forever!

Sichon king of the Emori for His mercy endures forever!

And `Og king of Bashan for His mercy endures forever!

Then he gave their land as a heritage for His mercy endures forever!

To be possessed by Israel his servant for His mercy endures forever!

Who remembers us whenever we are brought low for His mercy endures forever!

And rescues us from our enemies for His mercy endures forever!

Who provides food for every living creature for His mercy endures forever!

Give thanks to the God of heaven for His mercy endures forever!

Sing:

Hodu l'Adonai ki tov,

Ki le-olam chasdo x2

Hodu, hodu, hodu, hodu,

Hodu l'Adonai ki tov

Hodu, hodu, hodu, hodu,

Ki le-alom chasdo.

Tehillim/Psalms 136




Let My People Go!

When Israel was in Egypt’s land,
        Let My people go!
Oppressed so hard they could not stand,
       Let My people go!   

  1. Refrain:
    • Go down, Moses,
      Way down in Egypt’s land;
      Tell old Pharaoh
      To let My people go!
  2. No more shall they in bondage toil,
    Let My people go!
    Let them come out with Egypt’s spoil,
    Let My people go!
  3. You need not always weep and mourn,
    Let My people go!
    And wear these slav’ry chains forlorn,
    Let My people go!
    1. Refrain:
    2. Go down, Moses,
      Way down in Egypt’s land;
      Tell old Pharaoh
      To let My people go!
  4. Your foes shall not before you stand,
    Let My people go!
    And you’ll possess fair Canaan’s land,
    Let My people go!

Chad Gadya, Chad Gadya (one little goat, one little goat)

In turns, go around the table and each person try to sing the verse in one breath! Everyone sings Chad Gadya together.

Chad Gadya, Chad Gadya

My father bought for two zuzim*

.

Chad Gadya, Chad Gadya

.

The cat came, and ate the goat

Which my father bought for two zuzim

.

Chad Gadya, Chad Gadya

.

The dog came, and bit the cat, that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim

.

Chad Gadya, Chad Gadya

.

The mother with stick came, and beat the dog

that bit the cat, that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim

.

Chad Gadya, Chad Gadya

.

The fire came, and burned the stick

that beat the dog, that bit the cat, that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

.

Chad Gadya, Chad Gadya

.

The water came, and extinguished the fire,

that burned the stick, that beat the dog

that bit the cat, that ate the goat

Which my father bought for two zuzim

.

Chad Gadya, Chad Gadya

.

The ox came, and drank the water,

that extinguished the fire, that burned the stick,

that beat the dog, that bit the cat, that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim.

.

Chad Gadya, Chad Gadya

.

The slaughterer (Shohet) came, and killed the ox,

that drank the water, that extinguished the fire

that burned the stick, that beat the dog,

that bit the cat, that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim

.

Chad Gadya, Chad Gadya

.

The angel of death came, and slew the slaughterer,

who killed the ox, that drank the water

that extinguished the fire, that burned the stick

that beat the dog, that bit the cat, that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim

.

Chad Gadya, Chad Gadya

.

Then came the Holy One, Blessed be He

and smote the angel of death, who slew the slaughterer

who killed the ox, that drank the water

that extinguished the fire, that burned the stick

that beat the dog, that bit the cat, that ate the goat,

Which my father bought for two zuzim

.

Chad Gadya, Chad Gadya




Who knows one?

I know one.

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows two?

I know two.

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows three?

I know three.

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows four?

I know four.

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows five?

I know five.

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows six?

I know six.

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows seven?

I know seven.

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows eight?

I know eight.

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows nine?

I know nine.

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows ten?

I know ten.

Ten are the Words from Sinai

Nine are the months of childbirth

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows eleven?

I know eleven.

Eleven are the stars

Ten are the Words from Sinai

Nine are the months of childbirth

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows twelve?

I know twelve.

Twelve are the tribes

Eleven are the stars

Ten are the Words from Sinai

Nine are the months of childbirth

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows thirteen?

I know thirteen

Thirteen are the attributes of God

Twelve are the tribes

Eleven are the stars

Ten are the Words from Sinai

Nine are the months of childbirth

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth



Hallel

I will take you as a nation...

Contributed by Elizabeth Spring
Source: ha-mashiach.com Leon Zernitzky (image)


We now come to the fourth and final cup of wine for the Seder. This cup represents the fourth promise of the Lord “I will acquire you as a nation… I will take you to be my people, and I will be your God.”

Since Yeshua told his disciples that he would not drink the fourth cup but promised to do so with them in the coming Kingdom it is called the cup of Restoration. For this cup is to only be fully savored after all Israel shall be saved (i.e. restored). We pour the fourth cup of wine and recite portions of the Hallel prayer, praising the Eternal One for His kindness and grace to us:

O Israel, trust in the LORD! He is their help and their shield! O house of Aaron, trust in the Eternal One! He is their help and their shield! You who fear the Eternal One, trust in the Eternal One! He is their help and their shield!

I thank you that you have answered me and have become my salvation. The stone that the builders rejected has become the cornerstone. This is the Eternal One’s doing; it is marvelous in our eyes. This is the day that the Eternal One has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it.

As our Seder draws to an end, we once again take up our cups of wine. The Redemption is not yet complete. The fourth cup recalls us to our covenant with the Holy One, to the tasks that still await us as a people called to holy service, to a great purpose for which the people of Israel live: the preservation and affirmation of hope.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶ

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p'ri ha-gafen.

Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the universe, who creates the fruit of the vine.

All drink the fourth cup of wine



Nirtzah

L'shana Haba'ah!

Contributed by Elizabeth Spring
Source: ha-mashiach.com

The Passover Seder is now complete. It is our hope that one day soon we will enjoy fellowship together with the Messiah himself in his coming kingdom. We will spend the rest of the evening singing beautiful seder songs and enjoying one another’s company. Then when we are ready to depart, we say to one another: “May the Eternal One, the Almighty of Israel bless you, keep you, and shine His face upon you.” Amen.

We put down our Haggadahs and all shout out:

“Leshanah haba’ah bi-yerushalayim! Next year in Jerusalem!”

Sing:

L’shana haba’ah bi-Yerushalayim x4

Hallelyuah!

La la lala la la…