Passover Haggadah for 5776

By Adina Yoe

Passover



Table of Contents

Introduction

The (Crowded) Vegan Seder Plate

Happy passover

Kadesh

Setting Ourselves Apart

Kadesh

Kadesh

Kiddush

4 Cups, 4 Promises and 4 Mothers

Urchatz

Urchatz - Wash Your Hands To Prepare for the Seder

Urchatz-- Washing Without Blessing

Urchatz

Karpas

Traditional - Karpas

KARPAS: EAT A GREEN VEGETABLE

Yachatz

Traditional - Yachatz

Entering the Broken World

Visual Yachatz

Yachatz - Breaking the Middle Matzah

Brokenness and Concealment

Maggid - Beginning

Maggid (Introduction)

Ga Lakhma Anya

-- Four Questions

The Four Questions

Traditional - Four Questions

-- Exodus Story

Let my People Go

Telling our Story

Moses See the Hebrews

-- Ten Plagues

Egyptian Cats

-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

Dayenu

In Every Generation & Second Cup

Rachtzah

Rachtzah

Motzi-Matzah

Motzi-Matzah

Maror

Traditional - Maror

Reflection on Maror

Koreich

Traditional - Korech

Visual Koreich

Hillel Sandwich

Shulchan Oreich

The Wandering is Over Haggadah - Shulchan Oreich

Shulchan Orech

Tzafun

The Wandering is Over Haggadah - Tzafoon

Bareich

Kavannah for Opening the Door for Elijah

Hallel

Adrienne Rich on Freedom

Cup of Elijah

Nirtzah

Traditional - Nirtzah

Songs

Adir Hu (transliteration)

Chad Gadya (transliteration)

The Wandering is Over Haggadah - Who Knows One

Searching for Hametz (Bedikat haChametz)

Chad Gadya



Introduction

The (Crowded) Vegan Seder Plate

Contributed by Laura Craig Mason
Source: Laura & Salty Femme Haggadah

The  (Crowded) Vegan Seder Plate

The Seder Plate holds elements of the Seder story. This vegan Seder plate removes animal products, and adds the orange ensuring a space for women at this table.

  • Zeroa - for some a 'roasted bone', but on our plate a roasted beet that represents the Passover sacrifice offered while the Temple stood in Jerusalem (before 70 CE)
  • Beitza - for some a roasted egg, but for on our plate it is an avacado seed (or olives) representing both the Passover offering and the cycle of life and death.
  • Maror - A bitter herb (horseradish), which reminds us of the bitterness of enslavement.
  • Charoset - A mixture of fruit, nuts, wine and spices, which represents the mortar our ancestors used to build the structures in Mitzrayim (Egypt)
  • Karpas - A green vegetable (beet greens), which symbolizes hope and renewal.
  • Chazeret - A second bitter vegetable (parsley), again reminding us of the harshness of slavery
  • Orange - acknowledging the role of women in Jewish myths, community and society overall
  • Olive - For slavery to be truly over, for a people to be truly free, we must know that we can feed ourselves and our children, today, tomorrow, and into the following generations. In the lands of Israel and Palestine, olive groves provide this security. When olive groves are destroyed, the past and future is destroyed. Without economic security, a people can much more easily be conquered, or enslaved.


Introduction

Happy passover

Contributed by lindsey Young
Source: google images

Happy passover


Kadesh

Setting Ourselves Apart

Contributed by Lisa Kaufman
Source: http://www.aish.com/h/pes/t/si/48941956.html

The first step to growth is to realize we are worthy of growth. We need to see the value of who we are so we will see that we are worthy of investing time, energy, and effort into developing our spiritual potential.

Kadesh is the first step. It's the foundation for the whole Seder experience. We see this in the word "Kadesh," which is translated as "sanctify," but literally means to "set apart," in the sense of designating something as unique and special. Kadesh is that moment when we "set apart" or sanctify the time we're in. We "set apart" the Passover night as holy and unique.

In this sense, Kadesh moves us to "set ourselves apart" - to realize we're unique so we can begin to invest in personal growth.

We invest in something only when we believe it has value. This is true in finance as well as in interpersonal relationships. We spend time and energy with people whom we perceive as having worth. This is also true with self-growth. We will invest our time and energy to develop our potential only if we believe we are worthy.

If we base our self-worth on what we possess and have accomplished, we lose our uniqueness. What is the source of self-worth? Consciously or sub-consciously we base our self-worth on what we possess and what we have accomplished: How much is my income? How big is my house? What kind of car and clothes do I own? Our possessions give tangible value, as do our achievements, our profession, which university we attended, whether we're married, and if we have children.

In fact these two barometers do not give us a true sense of our uniqueness and value. Instead they cause us to lose our sense of distinctiveness.

We intuitively know that self-worth means feeling special. Feeling special stems from recognizing we are each unique. Rarity defines value. When we judge our self-worth by our possessions and accomplishments, that judgment can be made only by comparing our status to others. However, once we're comparing these external realities, the differences are in the quantity. A person's uniqueness is lost in this "judging by comparison." I am just like everyone. The only difference is the quantity of external trappings. What makes me unique - and therefore valuable - is lost.

The Torah tells us that we are made in the "image of God." What is this "image of God"? Just as the Almighty is one - absolutely unique - every human being is one of a kind, unique, special and rare.

We are created in God's image and therefore we are worthy. It's not because of what we possess or have accomplished, but simply because we are. Our very existence is intrinsically valuable. We are created in the image of God, unique, and therefore worthy. This is what Kadesh teaches us.



Kadesh

Kadesh

Contributed by JewishBoston
Source: The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

All Jewish celebrations, from holidays to weddings, include wine as a symbol of our joy – not to mention a practical way to increase that joy. The seder starts with wine and then gives us three more opportunities to refill our cup and drink.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who chose us from all peoples and languages, and sanctified us with commandments, and lovingly gave to us special times for happiness, holidays and this time of celebrating the Holiday of Matzah, the time of liberation, reading our sacred stories, and remembering the Exodus from Egypt. For you chose us and sanctified us among all peoples. And you have given us joyful holidays. We praise God, who sanctifies the people of Israel and the holidays.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם
 שֶׁהֶחֱיָנוּ וְקִיְּמָנוּ וְהִגִּיעָנוּ לַזְּמַן הַזֶּה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam,
she-hechiyanu v’key’manu v’higiyanu lazman hazeh.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything,
who has kept us alive, raised us up, and brought us to this happy moment.

Drink the first glass of wine!



Kadesh

Kadesh

Contributed by Arianna Lechan
Source: Family Haggadah: A Seder for All Generations by Elie M. Gindi

Kadesh


Kadesh

Kiddush

Contributed by Haggadot
Source: Design by Haggadot.com

Kiddush



Kadesh

4 Cups, 4 Promises and 4 Mothers

Contributed by Mishael Zion
Source: A Night to Remember: The Haggadah of Contemporary Voices by Mishael Zion and Noam Zion http://haggadahsrus.com/NTR.html

The Four Cups of the Seder are structurally connected to the four verbal performances this evening:

(1) Kiddush, sanctifying the holiday (2) Maggid, the storytelling (3) Birkat HaMazon, completing the Pesach meal; and (4) Hallel, completing the festival Psalms.

The Talmud connects the Four Cups to God's Four Promises to Israel: "Tell the children of Israel: I am Adonai! I will take them out... I will rescue them… I will redeem them… and I will marry them taking them as my people and I will be their God" (Exodus 6:6-7, Jerusalem Talmud Pesachim 10:1).

However, two 16th C. mystic rabbis identify the Four Cups with the Four Matriarchs of Israel. The Maharal of Prague (famous for the legend of Golem) and Rav Isaiah Horowitz of Tsfat explain:

(1) The Cup of Kiddush stands for Sarah who was the mother of a community of converts, believers by choice.

(2) The Cup of Maggid is for Rebecca who knew how to mother both Esav and Jacob, two opposed natures.

(3) The Cup of the Blessing after Eating represents Rachel whose son Joseph provided the whole family of Jacob with bread in a time of great famine.

(4) The Cup of Hallel (Praise) is for Leah who came to realize that the pursuit of the impossible, Jacob's love, must give way to appreciation of what one has. When her fourth child was born, Judah, she praised God: " This time I will thank God " (Genesis 29:35).



Urchatz

Urchatz - Wash Your Hands To Prepare for the Seder

Contributed by JewishBoston
Source: The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

Water is refreshing, cleansing, and clear, so it’s easy to understand why so many cultures and religions use water for symbolic purification. We will wash our hands twice during our seder: now, with no blessing, to get us ready for the rituals to come; and then again later, we’ll wash again with a blessing, preparing us for the meal, which Judaism thinks of as a ritual in itself. (The Jewish obsession with food is older than you thought!)

To wash your hands, you don’t need soap, but you do need a cup to pour water over your hands. Pour water on each of your hands three times, alternating between your hands. If the people around your table don’t want to get up to walk all the way over to the sink, you could pass a pitcher and a bowl around so everyone can wash at their seats… just be careful not to spill!

Too often during our daily lives we don’t stop and take the moment to prepare for whatever it is we’re about to do.

Let's pause to consider what we hope to get out of our evening together tonight. Go around the table and share one hope or expectation you have for tonight's seder.




Urchatz-- Washing Without Blessing

Why is this washing of the hands different than all others?
Here's a reminder why...
(We do not recite the blessing)



Urchatz

Urchatz

Contributed by Heather
Source: Unknown

Urchatz

Each person takes the water jug and washes the hands of the person next to them.

Leader: As we wash, let us remember to be servants of one another, yet know that we are worthy to have our hands washed by others.



Karpas

Traditional - Karpas

Contributed by Haggadot
Source: Traditional

Take less than a kezayit (the volume of one olive) of the karpas, dip it into salt-water, and recite the following blessing:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הָאֲדָמָה

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu melech ha’olam, borei p’ri ha’adamah.

Blessed are You, Lord, our God, Ruler of the universe, who creates the fruit of the earth.



Karpas

KARPAS: EAT A GREEN VEGETABLE

Contributed by Jessica
Source: Rachel Barenblat

At this point in the  seder, it is traditional to eat a green vegetable dipped in  salt water.  The green vegetable  represents rebirth, renewal and growth; the salt water represents the tears of enslavement.

Baruch atah, Adonai, eloheinu ruach ha’olam, borei p’ri ha’adamah.

Blessed are you, Adonai, Breath of Life, creator of the fruit of the earth.



Yachatz

Traditional - Yachatz

Contributed by Haggadot
Source: Traditional

Take the middle matzah and break it into two, one piece larger than the other.

The larger piece is set aside to serve as Afikoman. This is traditionally hidden, by the leader of the Seder for the children to “steal” or “find” and then ransom for a something at the end of the Seder.

The smaller piece is put back, between the two matzot. This smaller piece, along with the top matzah is what will be used for the “Motzi-Matzah” and “Korech”



Yachatz

Entering the Broken World

Contributed by Mishael Zion
Source: A Night to Remember: The Haggadah of Contemporary Voices by Mishael Zion and Noam Zion http://haggadahsrus.com/NTR.html

The Pesach story begins in a broken world, amidst slavery and oppression. The sound of the breaking of the matza sends us into that fractured existence, only to become whole again when we find the broken half, the afikoman, at the end of the Seder.

This brokenness is not just a physical or political situation: It reminds us of all those hard, damaged places within ourselves. All those narrow places from which we want to break to free. In Hebrew, Egypt is called Mitzrayim, reminding us of the word tzar, narrow. Thus, in Hassidic thought, Mitzrayim symbolizes the inner straits that trap our souls. Yet even here we can find a unique value, as the Hassidic saying teaches us: "There is nothing more whole – than a broken heart."

SHARE: Pass out a whole matza to every Seder participant, inviting them to take a moment to ponder this entrance into a broken world, before they each break the matza themselves.



Yachatz

Visual Yachatz

Contributed by Matan Inc
Source: Matan

Visual Yachatz


Yachatz

Yachatz - Breaking the Middle Matzah

Contributed by JewishBoston
Source: The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

There are three pieces of matzah stacked on the table. We now break the middle matzah into two pieces. The host should wrap up the larger of the pieces and, at some point between now and the end of dinner, hide it. This piece is called the afikomen, literally “dessert” in Greek. After dinner, the guests will have to hunt for the afikomen in order to wrap up the meal… and win a prize.

We eat matzah in memory of the quick flight of our ancestors from Egypt. As slaves, they had faced many false starts before finally being let go. So when the word of their freedom came, they took whatever dough they had and ran with it before it had the chance to rise, leaving it looking something like matzah.

Uncover and hold up the three pieces of matzah and say:

This is the bread of poverty which our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt. All who are hungry, come and eat; all who are needy, come and celebrate Passover with us. This year we are here; next year we will be in Israel. This year we are slaves; next year we will be free.

These days, matzah is a special food and we look forward to eating it on Passover. Imagine eating only matzah, or being one of the countless people around the world who don’t have enough to eat.

What does the symbol of matzah say to us about oppression in the world, both people literally enslaved and the many ways in which each of us is held down by forces beyond our control? How does this resonate with events happening now?



Yachatz

Brokenness and Concealment

Contributed by VBS
Source: Valley Beth Shalom Haggadah

We are free, but we remember when we were slaves. We are whole, but we bring to mind those who are broken. The middle matzah is broken, but it is the larger part which is hidden. Because the future will be greater than the past, and tomorrow’s Passover nobler than yesterday’s exodus. The prospects for the dreamed future are overwhelming to the point of making us mute. So it is in silence, without blessing, that we break and hide the matzah and long for its recovery and our redemption. 


Maggid - Beginning

Maggid (Introduction)

Contributed by JewishBoston
Source: The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

Pour the second glass of wine for everyone.

The Haggadah doesn’t tell the story of Passover in a linear fashion. We don’t hear of Moses being found by the daughter of Pharaoh – actually, we don’t hear much of Moses at all. Instead, we get an impressionistic collection of songs, images, and stories of both the Exodus from Egypt and from Passover celebrations through the centuries. Some say that minimizing the role of Moses keeps us focused on the miracles God performed for us. Others insist that we keep the focus on the role that every member of the community has in bringing about positive change.



Maggid - Beginning

Ga Lakhma Anya

Contributed by Adina Yoe
Source: "A Night to Remember: A Haggadah of Contemporary Voices."

Ha Lakhma Anya is essentially the "Story of the Matza." Told in Aramaic, once the everyday language of Talmudic Jews, this story has three parts: a memory, an action, and a hope. First we point out the Matza, the bread of poverty that we ate in Egypt. Then, remembering our poverty in the past, we invite all needy persons to join our table tonight. Finally, we express we express the hope that while this year human beings are still enslaved in many ways, often lacking a home for themselves, next year we will all be free people - in our own personal and national home. 



-- Four Questions

The Four Questions

Contributed by JewishBoston
Source: JewishBoston.com

The formal telling of the story of Passover is framed as a discussion with lots of questions and answers. The tradition that the youngest person asks the questions reflects the centrality of involving everyone in the seder. The rabbis who created the set format for the seder gave us the Four Questions to help break the ice in case no one had their own questions. Asking questions is a core tradition in Jewish life. If everyone at your seder is around the same age, perhaps the person with the least seder experience can ask them – or everyone can sing them all together.

מַה נִּשְׁתַּנָּה הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה מִכָּל הַלֵּילות

Ma nishtana halaila hazeh mikol haleilot?

Why is this night different from all other nights?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכלין חָמֵץ וּמַצָּה  הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה כֻּלּוֹ מצה  

Shebichol haleilot anu ochlin chameitz u-matzah. Halaila hazeh kulo matzah.

On all other nights we eat both leavened bread and matzah.
Tonight we only eat matzah.

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכְלִין שְׁאָר יְרָקוֹת הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה מָרוֹר

Shebichol haleilot anu ochlin shi’ar yirakot haleila hazeh maror.

On all other nights we eat all kinds of vegetables,
but tonight we eat bitter herbs.

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אֵין אָֽנוּ מַטְבִּילִין אֲפִילוּ פַּֽעַם אחָת  הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה שְׁתֵּי פְעמים

Shebichol haleilot ain anu matbilin afilu pa-am echat. Halaila hazeh shtei fi-amim.

On all other nights we aren’t expected to dip our vegetables one time.
Tonight we do it twice.

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָֽנוּ אוֹכְלִין בֵּין יוֹשְׁבִין וּבֵין מְסֻבִּין.  :הַלַּֽיְלָה הַזֶּה כֻּלָּֽנוּ מְסֻבין

Shebichol haleilot anu ochlin bein yoshvin uvein m’subin. Halaila hazeh kulanu m’subin.

On all other nights we eat either sitting normally or reclining.
Tonight we recline.




                 Maggid – Four Questions

מַהנִּשְּׁתַּנָה

?מַה נִּשְּׁתַּנָה הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה מִכָּל הַלֵּילוֹת

Mah nish-ta-na ha-lai-lah ha-zeh mikol ha-lei-lot?

Why is this night of Passover different from all other nights of the year?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָנוּ אוֹכְלִין חָמֵץ וּמַצָּה, הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה - כּוּלוֹ מַצָּה

She-b'chol ha-lei-lot anu och'lin cha-meitz u-matzah. Ha-laylah hazeh kulo matzah.

On all other nights, we eat either leavened or unleavened bread, why on this night do we eat only matzah?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָנוּ אוֹכְלִין שְׁאָר יְרָקוֹת, - הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה מָרוֹר

Sheb'chol ha-lei-lot anu och'lin sh'ar y'rakot. Ha-lai-lah h-azeh maror.

On all other nights, we eat vegetables of all kinds, why on this night must we eat bitter herbs?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אֵין אֶנוּ מַטְבִּילִין אֲפִילוּ פַּעַם אֶחָת, - הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה שְׁתֵּי פְעָמִים

Sheb'chol ha-lei-lot ein anu mat-beelin afee-lu pa-am echat.Ha-lai-lah hazeh sh'tei p'ameem.

On all other nights, we do not dip vegetables even once,
why on this night do we dip greens into salt water and bitter herbs into sweet haroset?

שֶׁבְּכָל הַלֵּילוֹת אָנוּ אוֹכְלִין בֵּין יוֹשְׁבִין וּבֵין מְסֻבִּין, - הַלַּיְלָה הַזֶּה כֻּלָנו מְסֻ

Sheb’khol ha-lei-lot anu och-leem bein yo-shveen u-vein m’su-been, ha-lailah hazeh kulanu m’subeen.

On all other nights, everyone sits up straight at the table, why on this night do we recline and eat at leisure?



-- Exodus Story

Let my People Go

Contributed by Ezra Match
Source: http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/l/louis_armstrong/let_my_people_go.html

Let my People Go

Louis Armstrong

Go down moses

Way down in egypt land

Tell all pharaoes to

Let my people go!

When israel was in egypt land...

Let my people go!

Oppressed so hard they could not stand...

Let my people go!

So the God seyeth:

go down, moses

Way down in egypt land

Tell all pharaoes to

Let my people go!

So moses went to egypt land...

Let my people go!

He made all pharaoes understand...

Let my people go!

Yes the lord said go down, moses

Way down in egypt land

Tell all pharaoes to

Let my people go!

Thus spoke the lord, bold moses said:

Let my people go!

If not I'll smite, your firstborns dead

Let my people go!

God-the lord said go down, moses

Way down in egypt land

Tell all pharaoes to

Let my people go!

Tell all pharaoes

To let my people go



-- Exodus Story

Telling our Story

Contributed by JewishBoston
Source: The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

Our story starts in ancient times, with Abraham, the first person to have the idea that maybe all those little statues his contemporaries worshiped as gods were just statues. The idea of one God, invisible and all-powerful, inspired him to leave his family and begin a new people in Canaan, the land that would one day bear his grandson Jacob’s adopted name, Israel.

God had made a promise to Abraham that his family would become a great nation, but this promise came with a frightening vision of the troubles along the way: “Your descendants will dwell for a time in a land that is not their own, and they will be enslaved and afflicted for four hundred years; however, I will punish the nation that enslaved them, and afterwards they shall leave with great wealth."

Raise the glass of wine and say:

וְהִיא שֶׁעָמְדָה לַאֲבוֹתֵֽינוּ וְלָֽנוּ

V’hi she-amda l’avoteinu v’lanu.

This promise has sustained our ancestors and us.

For not only one enemy has risen against us to annihilate us, but in every generation there are those who rise against us. But God saves us from those who seek to harm us.

The glass of wine is put down.

In the years our ancestors lived in Egypt, our numbers grew, and soon the family of Jacob became the People of Israel. Pharaoh and the leaders of Egypt grew alarmed by this great nation growing within their borders, so they enslaved us. We were forced to perform hard labor, perhaps even building pyramids. The Egyptians feared that even as slaves, the Israelites might grow strong and rebel. So Pharaoh decreed that Israelite baby boys should be drowned, to prevent the Israelites from overthrowing those who had enslaved them.

But God heard the cries of the Israelites. And God brought us out of Egypt with a strong hand and outstretched arm, with great awe, miraculous signs and wonders. God brought us out not by angel or messenger, but through God’s own intervention. 



-- Exodus Story

Moses See the Hebrews

Contributed by Nina Paley
Source: http://blog.ninapaley.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/MosesHebrewsThirst.png

Moses See the Hebrews


-- Ten Plagues

Egyptian Cats

Contributed by The Horowitzes
Source: Copyright 2008 DaySpring Cards. All rights reserved.

Egyptian Cats


-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

Dayenu

Contributed by Bari Kessler
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dayenu

Dayenu

  

Verse 1:

If He had brought us out from Egypt,

Ilu hotzianu mimitzrayim,

אִלּוּ הוֹצִיאָנוּ מִמִּצְרָיִם

and had not carried out judgments against them

v'lo asah bahem sh'fatim,

וְלֹא עָשָׂה בָּהֶם שְׁפָטִים

— Dayenu, it would have sufficed!

dayeinu!

דַּיֵּנוּ

Verse 2:

If He had carried out judgments against them,

Ilu asah bahem sh'fatim

אִלּוּ עָשָׂה בָּהֶם שְׁפָטִים

and not against their idols

v'lo asah beloheihem,

וְלֹא עָשָׂה בֵּאלֹהֵיהֶם

— Dayenu, it would have sufficed!

dayeinu!

דַּיֵּנוּ

Verse 3:

If He had destroyed their idols,

Ilu asah beloheihem,

אִלּוּ עָשָׂה בֵּאלֹהֵיהֶם

and had not smitten their first-born

v'lo harag et b'choreihem,

וְלֹא הָרַג אֶת בְּכוֹרֵיהֶם

— Dayenu, it would have sufficed!

dayeinu!

דַּיֵּנוּ

Verse 4:

If He had smitten their first-born,

Ilu harag et b'choreihem,

אִלּוּ הָרַג אֶת בְּכוֹרֵיהֶם

and had not given us their wealth

v'lo natan lanu et mamonam,

וְלֹא נָתַן לָנוּ אֶת מָמוֹנָם

— Dayenu, it would have sufficed!

dayeinu!

דַּיֵּנוּ

Verse 5:

If He had given us their wealth,

Ilu natan lanu et mamonam,

אִלּוּ נָתַן לָנוּ אֶת מָמוֹנָם

and had not split the sea for us

v'lo kara lanu et hayam,

ןלא קָרַע לָנוּ אֶת הַיָּם

— Dayenu, it would have sufficed!

dayeinu!

דַּיֵּנוּ

Verse 6:

If He had split the sea for us,

Ilu kara lanu et hayam,

אִלּוּ קָרַע לָנוּ אֶת הַיָּם

and had not taken us through it on dry land

v'lo he'eviranu b'tocho becharavah,

וְלֹא הֶעֱבִירָנוּ בְּתוֹכוֹ בֶּחָרָבָה

— Dayenu, it would have sufficed!

dayeinu!

דַּיֵּנוּ

Verse 7:

If He had taken us through the sea on dry land,

Ilu he'eviranu b'tocho becharavah,

אִלּוּ הֶעֱבִירָנוּ בְּתוֹכוֹ בֶּחָרָבָה

and had not drowned our oppressors in it

v'lo shika tzareinu b'tocho,

וְלֹא שִׁקַע צָרֵינוּ בְּתוֹכוֹ

— Dayenu, it would have sufficed!

dayeinu!

דַּיֵּנוּ

Verse 8:

If He had drowned our oppressors in it,

Ilu shika tzareinu b'tocho,

אִלּוּ שִׁקַע צָרֵינוּ בְּתוֹכוֹ

and had not supplied our needs in the desert for forty years

v'lo sipeik tzorkeinu bamidbar arba'im shana,

וְלֹא סִפֵּק צָרַכֵּנוּ בַּמִּדְבָּר אַרְבָּעִים שָׁנָה

— Dayenu, it would have sufficed!

dayeinu!

דַּיֵּנוּ

Verse 9:

If He had supplied our needs in the desert for forty years,

Ilu sipeik tzorkeinu bamidbar arba'im shana,

אִלּוּ סִפֵּק צָרַכֵּנוּ בַּמִּדְבָּר אַרְבָּעִים שָׁנָה

and had not fed us the manna

v'lo he'echilanu et haman,

וְלֹא הֶאֱכִילָנוּ אֶת הַמָּן

— Dayenu, it would have sufficed!

dayeinu!

דַּיֵּנוּ

Verse 10:

If He had fed us the manna,

Ilu he'echilanu et haman,

אִלּוּ הֶאֱכִילָנוּ אֶת הַמָּן

and had not given us the Shabbat

v'lo natan lanu et hashabbat,

וְלֹא נָתַן לָנוּ אֶת הַשַּׁבָּת

— Dayenu, it would have sufficed!

dayeinu!

דַּיֵּנוּ

Verse 11:

If He had given us the Shabbat,

Ilu natan lanu et hashabbat,

אִלּוּ נָתַן לָנוּ אֶת הַשַּׁבָּת

and had not brought us before Mount Sinai

v'lo keirvanu lifnei har sinai,

וְלֹא קֵרְבָנוּ לִפְנֵי הַר סִינַי

— Dayenu, it would have sufficed!

dayeinu!

דַּיֵּנוּ

Verse 12:

If He had brought us before Mount Sinai,

Ilu keirvanu lifnei har sinai,

אִלּוּ קֵרְבָנוּ לִפְנֵי הַר סִינַי

and had not given us the Torah

v'lo natan lanu et hatorah,

וְלֹא נָתַן לָנוּ אֶת הַתּוֹרָה

— Dayenu, it would have sufficed!

dayeinu!

דַּיֵּנוּ

Verse 13:

If He had given us the Torah,

Ilu natan lanu et hatorah,

אִלּוּ נָתַן לָנוּ אֶת הַתּוֹרָה

and had not brought us into the land of Israel

v'lo hichnisanu l'eretz yisra'eil,

וְלֹא הִכְנִיסָנוּ לְאֶרֶץ יִשְׂרָאֵל

— Dayenu, it would have sufficed!

dayeinu!

דַּיֵּנוּ

Verse 14:

If He had brought us into the land of Israel,

Ilu hichnisanu l'eretz yisra'eil,

אִלּוּ הִכְנִיסָנוּ לְאֶרֶץ יִשְׂרָאֵל

and not built for us the Holy Temple

v'lo vanah lanu et beit hamikdash,

וְלֹא בָּנָה לָנוּ אֶת בֵּית הַמִּקְדָּשׁ

— Dayenu, it would have sufficed!

dayeinu!

דַּיֵּנוּ



-- Cup #2 & Dayenu

In Every Generation & Second Cup

Contributed by JewishBoston
Source: The Wandering is Over Haggadah, JewishBoston.com

בְּכָל־דּוֹר וָדוֹר חַיָּב אָדָם לִרְאוֹת אֶת־עַצְמוֹ, כְּאִלּוּ הוּא יָצָא מִמִּצְרָֽיִם

B’chol dor vador chayav adam lirot et-atzmo, k’ilu hu yatzav mimitzrayim.

In every generation, everyone is obligated to see themselves as though they personally left Egypt.

The seder reminds us that it was not only our ancestors whom God redeemed; God redeemed us too along with them. That’s why the Torah says “God brought us out from there in order to lead us to and give us the land promised to our ancestors.”

---

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who redeemed us and our ancestors from Egypt, enabling us to reach this night and eat matzah and bitter herbs. May we continue to reach future holidays in peace and happiness.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ, אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגָּפֶן

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

We praise God, Ruler of Everything, who creates the fruit of the vine.

Drink the second glass of wine!



Rachtzah

Rachtzah

Contributed by Julie R
Source: Traditional

רחצה

Rachtzah

Wash hands while reciting the traditional blessing for washing the hands:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְשָׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָּנוּ עַל נְטִילַת יָדַיִם.

Baruch atah Adonai Eloheinu melech ha-olam, asher kid'shanu b'mitzvotav, v'tzivanu al n'tilat yadayim.

Praised are you, Adonai, Lord our God, Ruler of the universe, who has taught us the way of holiness through commandments, commanding us to wash our hands.



Motzi-Matzah

Motzi-Matzah

Contributed by Haggadot
Source: Original Illustration from Haggadot.com

Motzi-Matzah



Maror

Traditional - Maror

Contributed by Haggadot
Source: Traditional

Maror מָרוֹר

Now take a kezayit (the volume of one olive) of the maror. Dip it into the Charoset, but not so much that the bitter taste is neutralized. Recite the following blessing and then eat the maror (without reclining):

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו וְצִוָּנוּ עַל אֲכִילַת מָרוֹר.

Baruch atah Adonai Eloheinu melech ha-olam, asher kid'shanu b'mitzvotav v'tzivanu al achilat maror.

Praised are you, Adonai, Lord our God, Ruler of the universe, who has taught us the way of holiness through commandments, commanding us to eat the bitter herb.



Maror

Reflection on Maror

Contributed by Ezra Match
Source: Original

When we eat the maror, it makes our eyes water. Its bitterness turns our faces red. We lose control for a moment, and laugh because it's freeing. We cannot keep up appearances while eating maror, and so we don't try to.

Our sinuses open up. We cry. We laugh. We cry, and we laugh at our crying.



Koreich

Traditional - Korech

Contributed by Haggadot
Source: Traditional

Korech כּוֹרֵךְ

זֵכֶר לְמִקְדָּשׁ כְּהִלֵּל. כֵּן עָשָׂה הִלֵּל בִּזְמַן שבֵּית הַמִּקְדָּשׁ הָיָה קַיָים: הָיָה כּוֹרֵךְ מַצָּה וּמָרוֹר וְאוֹכֵל בְּיַחַד, לְקַיֵים מַה שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר: עַל מַצּוֹת וּמְרֹרִים יֹאכְלֻהוּ.

Zeicher l'mikdash k'hileil. Kein asah hileil bizman shebeit hamikdash hayah kayam. Hayah koreich pesach, matzah, u-maror v'ocheil b'yachad. L'kayeim mah shene-emar. “Al matzot um'rorim yochlu-hu.”

Eating matzah, maror and haroset this way reminds us of how, in the days of the Temple, Hillel would do so, making a sandwich of the Pashal lamb, matzah and maror, in order to observe the law “You shall eat it (the Pesach sacrifice) on matzah and maror.”



Koreich

Visual Koreich

Contributed by Matan Inc
Source: Matan

Visual Koreich


Koreich

Hillel Sandwich

Contributed by Haggadot
Source: Original Illustration from Haggadot.com

Hillel Sandwich



Eating the meal! | shulchan oreich | שֻׁלְחָן עוֹרֵךְ

Enjoy! But don’t forget when you’re done we’ve got a little more seder to go, including the final two cups of wine!




Shulchan Orech

As you eat, some food for thought:
As we prepare to enjoy the Passover meal, we take a moment to celebrate a recent
victory. During the meal, we welcome you to discuss any of these readings or on the
themes of struggle and freedom.




Finding and eating the Afikomen | tzafoon | צָפוּן

The playfulness of finding the afikomen reminds us that we balance our solemn memories of slavery with a joyous celebration of freedom. As we eat the afikomen, our last taste of matzah for the evening, we are grateful for moments of silliness and happiness in our lives.



Bareich

Kavannah for Opening the Door for Elijah

Contributed by HIAS
Source: HIAS Seder Supplement

Kavannah for Opening the Door for Elijah
Gathered around the Seder table, we pour four cups, remembering the gift of freedom that our ancestors received centuries ago. We delight in our liberation from Pharaoh’s oppression.

We drink four cups for four promises fulfilled.

The first cup as God said, “I will free you from the labors of the Egyptians.”

The second as God said, “And I will deliver you from their bondage.”

The third as God said, “I will redeem you with an outstretched arm and with great judgments.”

The fourth because God said, “I will take you to be My People.”

We know, though, that all are not yet free. As we welcome Elijah the Prophet into our homes, we offer a fifth cup, a cup not yet consumed.

A fifth cup for the 60 million refugees and displaced people around the world still waiting to be freefrom the refugee camps in Chad to the cities and towns of Ukraine, for the Syrian refugees still waiting to be delivered from the hands of tyrants, for the thousands of asylum seekers in the United States still waiting in detention for redemption to come, for all those who yearn to be taken in not as strangers but as fellow human beings.

This Passover, let us walk in the footsteps of the One who delivered us from bondage. When we rise from our Seder tables, may we be emboldened to take action on behalf of the world’s refugees, hastening Elijah’s arrival as we speak out on behalf of those who are not yet free. 



Hallel

Adrienne Rich on Freedom

Contributed by Richard Schwartz
Source: http://jwa.org/blog/passover-poetry-re-telling-story-of-our-own-lives

Freedom. It isn’t once, to walk outunder the Milky Way, feeling the riversof light, the fields of dark—freedom is daily, prose-bound, routineremembering. Putting together, inch by inchthe starry worlds. From all the lost collections.

"For Memory,"  A Wild Patience Has Taken Me This Far



Hallel

Cup of Elijah

Contributed by Kate Judd
Source: various

The Fourth Cup of Wine

Reader: At this point we fill a cup for Elijah and open the door to let him in. Tradition states that before the Messiah comes the Prophet Elijah will come to ignite an era of peace.Let us open the door and instead of passively waiting for that era of peace think what it is we can do in our lives to bring it closer.

Reader:

Haggadah Haiku

On Passover we

Opened the door for Elijah

Now our cat is gone.

Leader: Let us all fill our wine glasses.

{Picks up Elijah's cup for all to see.}

This is the cup of Elijah. According to tradition, we open the door to permit the possible entry of the prophet Elijah, who is, according to tradition, the herald of the Mashiach or an era of peace and freedom for all human beings.

Reader: We, too, open the door to peace, knowing that Elijah's task is really our own. Only when we have made a world where nation shall not lift up sword against nation, where justice is universal, and where each person is free, will the age-old dream of peace be real.

{The door is opened.}

All sing: Eliyahu ha-navee, Eliyahu ha-Tish-bee Eliyahu, eliyahu, Eliyahu ha-Giladee

Beem-hei-ra b'ya-mei-nu Yavo ei-leinu Eem ma-shee-ach ben David Eem ma-shee-ach ben David

{Children come back to see if Elijah has drunk from the cup.}

Leader: We now bless our fourth cup of wine:

Baruch Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha-olam, borei p’ree hagafen.

Miriam’s Cup

Reader: The story has been told of a miraculous well of living water which had accompanied the Jewish people since the world began. In the time of the Exodus from Mitzrayim, Miriam called the well to her and it stayed with the Jews as they wandered the desert. Upon Miriam’s death, the well again disappeared.

{Whatever wine remains in the wine glasses is now emptied into a bowl. Water is then poured into everyone’s wine glass.}

Reader: Now, as we begin a season of renewal, may cleansing, refreshing waters, reminiscent of Miriam’s well, recall for us a purity of purpose and help us focus on the tasks ahead to help bring freedom to all the peoples of the world.

{All drink the water from Miriam’s well.}



Nirtzah

Traditional - Nirtzah

Contributed by Haggadot
Source: Traditional

Nirtzah נרצה

After all the singing is concluded we rise and recite together the traditional formula, the Seder is concluded .

חֲסַל סִדּוּר פֶּסַח כְּהִלְכָתוֹ, כְּכָל מִשְׁפָּטוֹ וְחֻקָתוֹ. כַּאֲשֶׁר זָכִינוּ לְסַדֵּר אוֹתוֹ. כֵּן נִזְכֶּה לַעֲשׂוֹתוֹ. זָךְ שׁוֹכֵן מְעוֹנָה, קוֹמֵם קְהַל עֲדַת מִי מָנָה. בְּקָרוֹב נַהֵל נִטְעֵי כַנָּה. פְּדוּיִם לְצִיוֹן בְּרִנָּה.

Chasal sidur pesach k'hilchato, k'chol mishpato v'chukato. Ka-asher zachinu l'sadeir oto, kein nizkeh la-asoto. Zach shochein m'onah, komeim k'hal adat mi manah. B'karov naheil nitei chanah, p'duyim l'tzion b'rinah.

The Passover Seder is concluded, according to each traditional detail with all its laws and customs. As we have been privileged to celebrate this Seder, so may we one day celebrate it in Jerusalem. Pure One who dwells in the high places, support your People countless in number. May you soon redeem all your People joyfully in Zion.

At the conclusion of the Seder, everyone joins in singing:

לְשָׁנָה הַבָּאָה בִּירוּשַָׁלָיִם

L'shana Haba'ah b'Y’rushalayim

Next Year in Jerusalem!



Songs

Adir Hu (transliteration)

Contributed by Sara Smith
Source: Free Siddur Project, adapted

Adir hu, yivei baito b’karov. Bimheirah, bimheirah, b’yamainu b’karov. El b’nai, El b’nai, b’nai baitcha b’karov.


Bachur hu, gadol hu, dagul hu, yivei baito b’karov. Bimheirah, bimheirah, b’yamainu b’karov. El b’nai, El b’nai, b’nai baitcha b’karov.


Hadur hu, vatik hu, zakai hu, chasid hu, yivei baito b’karov. Bimheirah, bimheirah, b’yamainu b’karov. El b’nai, El b’nai, b’nai baitcha b’karov.


Tahor hu, yachid hu, kabir hu, lamud hu, melech hu yivei baito b’karov. Bimheirah, bimheirah, b’yamainu b’karov. El b’nai, El b’nai, b’nai baitcha b’karov.


Nora hu, sagiv hu, izuz hu, podeh hu, tzadik hu, yivei baito b’karov. Bimheirah, bimheirah, b’yamainu b’karov. El b’nai, El b’nai, b’nai baitcha b’karov.


Kadosh hu, rachum hu, shadai hu, takif hu yivei baito b’karov. Bimheirah, bimheirah, b’yamainu b’karov. El b’nai, El b’nai, b’nai baitcha b’karov.



Songs

Chad Gadya (transliteration)

Contributed by Sara Smith
Source: Free Siddur Project, adapted

Chad gadya, chad gadya.


D’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata shunra v’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata chalba v’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata chutra v’hika l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata nura v’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata maya v’chava l’nura,

d’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata tora v’shatah l’maya,

d’chava l’nura,

d’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah, 

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata hashocheit v’shachat l’tora,

d’shata l’maya,

d’chava l’nura,

d’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata malach hamavet v’shachat l’shocheit,

d’shachat l’tora,

d’shata l’maya,

d’chava l’nura,

d’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.


V’ata Hakodesh Baruch Hu v’shachat l’malach hamavet,

d’shachat l’shocheit,

d’shachat l’tora,

d’shata l’maya,

d’chava l’nura,

d’saraf l’chutra,

d’hikah l’chalba,

d’nashach l’shunrah,

d’achlah l’gadya,

d’zabin aba bitrei zuzei,

chad gadya, chad gadya.




Who knows one?

At some seders, people go around the table reading a question and the answers in one breath. Thirteen is hard!

Who knows one?

I know one.

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows two?

I know two.

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows two?

I know two.

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows four?

I know four.

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows five?

I know five.

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows six?

I know six.

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows seven?

I know seven.

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows eight?

I know eight.

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows nine?

I know nine.

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows ten?

I know ten.

Ten are the Words from Sinai

Nine are the months of childbirth

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows eleven?

I know eleven.

Eleven are the stars

Ten are the Words from Sinai

Nine are the months of childbirth

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows twelve?

I know twelve.

Twelve are the tribes

Eleven are the stars

Ten are the Words from Sinai

Nine are the months of childbirth

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth

Who knows thirteen?

I know thirteen

Thirteen are the attributes of God

Twelve are the tribes

Eleven are the stars

Ten are the Words from Sinai

Nine are the months of childbirth

Eight are the days for circumcision

Seven are the days of the week

Six are the orders of the Mishnah

Five are the books of the Torah

Four are the matriarchs

Three are the patriarchs

Two are the tablets of the covenant

One is our God in Heaven and Earth



Songs

Searching for Hametz (Bedikat haChametz)

Contributed by Adina Yoe
Source: "A Night to Remember: A Haggadah of Contemporary Voices," Chabad.org, and Star-K.org

"The human soul is the light, the candle of Hashem, for searching for the hidden, innermost self." (Proverbs, 20:27) 

The night before the seder, after dark, we search for hametz in all corners of the house in a veritable "search and destroy" mission. Hametz is grain products that may have leavened, fermented, and risen like yeast. We know that bedikat hahametz is not merely a time for inspection, but also for introspection. The 16th century Kabbalist, Moshe Alsheikh of Tzfat, said, "The search for hametz is not simply a search for leavened bread, but rather than opportunity examine ourselves. On the night before Pesach, when each of us is at home within our own walls, where there is no one else around, and we are not troubled by daily affairs, it is then that we can sit alone and confront all of our outstanding obligations to G-d, saying to our souls, 'Let us awaken and arise, let us examine our ways and turn away from all our sins. Let us cleanse and purify ourselves and remove our evil ways from G-d's sight. Let us become allies, my soul, and stand guard together. We will abjure slumber from our eyes day and night. We will not rest, rather we will be gatekeepers lest we return to our evil ways. Maybe G-d be with us as G-d was with the imahot and avot.'"

Prior to this night, we clean all the rooms where we may have eaten or stored food. Just before doing bedikat hahametz, we hide 10 pieces of hametz to be "found," wrapped in foil or other flammable material. It is a good idea to write down the places where we have "hidden" this hametz in case we forget.

For bedikat hahametz, we conduct the search in the dark, with a candle or flashlight for spotting hametz, and a feather and or a spoon for collecting hametz. All hametz found is burned the next morning, or placed in a separated area marked as "sold for Pesach." 

Prior to the search, recite the following blessing: 

"Baruch atah Ado-nai, Eloh-ainu Melech haOlam, Asher Kidishanu b'Mitzvotav, Vitzivanu al bee-ur haHametz." 

After the search, the morning of the seder, we bring the hametz to a bonfire to be incinerated. The burning of the hametz marks the symbolic division between hametz and matzah, winter and spring, the yetzer ha'ra (the evil inclination) and the yetzer hatov (the desire for good and purity). After the bonfire, we recite this formula called "Kol Hamira" in Aramaic, disowning any hametz still undiscovered in the house: 

"All hametz in my possession, whether I have seen it or not, and whether I have removed it or not, shall be nullified and ownerless as dust of the earth." 

After saying Kol Hamira, some Sephardim recite the following tikkun from the Ben Ish Hai:  "May it be your will, Hashem my G-d and the G-d of our ancestors, that just as we burned the hametz out of our homes today, so You will help us burn out the evil inclination from our hearts. Please, G-d, remove from our hearts the bad part of our ego, and purify us lovingly, empowering the good sides of our ego. Let our souls shine and be empowered with your light, and be connected to You in the highest holiness, which shall be with us always." 

Halachic P.S. - When Seder falls on Saturday night, the search is conducted on Thursday night and the bonfire is held on Friday morning. Hallah is put aside in a special "hametz zone" to be eaten by approximately 10 a.m. on Shabbat morning. The leftovers should be removed by flushing them down a toilet. 



Songs

Chad Gadya

Contributed by Adina Yoe
Source: Original

Chad Gadya